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damage, and fruit damage in cucurbits. For example, there is genetic variation among cucumber cultigens for germination at low temperature ( Lower, 1974 ; Nienhuis et al., 1983 ; Wehner, 1981 ). Cold germination has a heritability of 0.15 to 0

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referred to as cultigens) having different levels of resistance for their effect on disease severity and yield. Materials and Methods Experiment design. Field tests were done during the summer from 2008 to 2011 at the Horticultural Crops Research Station in

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miniwatermelon cultivars. The goal of this study was to evaluate miniwatermelon cultigens for yield, internal quality, and adaptability in various growing environments. Materials and Methods All locations. The seedless miniwatermelon seeds were obtained from

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in using differential cultigens ( Angelov et al., 2000 ; Bains and Jhooty, 1976a ; Inaba et al., 1986 ; Palti, 1974 ; Shetty et al., 2002 ). Studies of past ( Barnes and Epps, 1954 ) and recent ( Holmes et al., 2006 ) epidemics suggest that the

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concentration of pumpkin and squash ( C. moschata and C. pepo ) can be correlated with colorimetric analysis using the CIE L*a*b* color value system. Materials and Methods Plant material. An initial selection of 15 C. moschata and 15 C. pepo cultigens

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-evaluation of the most resistant and susceptible cultigens conducted at North Carolina State University ( Call et al., 2012 ). Several cultigens were identified with high levels of resistance to the new downy mildew. Among these cultigens, considerable attention

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number of melon cultigens [cultivars, breeding lines, and plant introductions (PIs)], and inheritance of resistance in melon. Fig. 1. Cucurbit leaf crumple virus-infected melon plants showing crumpling, curling, stunting, and yellowing leaf

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cultigens of C. maxima . In addition, we have observed that the interspecific hybrids exhibit intermediate resistance to powdery mildew disease [ Podosphaera xanthii (Castagna) U. Braun and N. Shirshkoff]. At the University of New Hampshire, bush breeding

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tolerance was developed by Smeets and Wehner (1997) using controlled environmental conditions and cultigens that were tolerant (AR75-79, ‘Chipper’, ‘Pixie’, and ‘Wisconsin SMR 18’) or susceptible (Gy14, ‘Marketmore 76’, NCSU M28, NCSU M29, and ‘Poinsett 76

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Twenty melon (Cucumis melo L.) cultigens (cultivars and breeding lines) were tested for salt tolerance. All cultigens were grown in the field using drip irrigation at three salt salinity levels: electrical conductivity (ECw = 1.2, 7.5, or 14.0 dS·m-1. Nineteen of the 20 cultigens proved to be salt-sensitive, as measured by reduction in fruit weight, but not necessarily to the same degree (i.e., some cultigens were tolerant at ECw = 7.5, whereas others were not). One line, `Evan Key', was salt-tolerant at ECw= 14.0. Increasing salinity levels did not affect the number of fruits produced in most cultigens. Overall, increasing salinity reduced netting quality but increased the total soluble solids content and shortened mean time to harvest in seven cultigens.

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