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John G. Metcalf, Andres A. Reyes, and Willard P. Mohr

Abstract

‘Bellestar’ (ST-50) is a tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill.) developed for the sandy loam to clay loam soils (pH 6.0 to 7.5) of the cool regions of eastern Ontario. The cultivar satisifies the need for an early hand harvest, processing tomato with a concentrated maturity. It also can be used for the fresh market as a pick-your-own pastetype tomato. Commercial growers in the northeastern United States have received this cultivar quite well and used it in a limited planting in 1983.

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J. L. Maas, A. D. Draper, and G. J. Galletta

Abstract

Four methods of inoculation with Verticillium were tested for effectiveness in infecting strawberry plants grown in a greenhouse bench. The most severe and early symptoms were produced with a macerated mycelium root dip inoculum. Effect of inoculum aggressiveness on the extrapolation of plant resistance information is discussed.

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S. Z. Berry and G. L. Oakes

Abstract

Ohio 11 and 12 greenhouse tomato Ly-copersicon esculentum Mill.) lines, resistant to Verticillium dahliae Kleb. Race 2 (Ve-Race 2) are pink, uniform-ripening, and large-fruited indeterminate types. Ohio 11 is also resistant to tobacco mosaic virus (Tm-22 ) and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicisly Coper-sici (For). Ohio 12 has similar disease resistance, but is heterozygous resistant for Tm-22 . They have potential as a germplasm source of the Ve-Race 2 resistance and other desirable characteristics. They may be useful as inbreds for the development of commercial greenhouse tomato hybrids.

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Jesse Wimer, Debra Inglis, and Carol Miles

Phytophthora capsici Leonian), and verticillium wilt (caused by Verticillium dahliae Kleb.) ( Louws et al., 2010 ). In Washington, verticillium wilt is problematic for watermelon growers due to the widespread distribution of the pathogen ( Sunseri and

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Beiquan Mou, Steven J. Klosterman, Amy Anchieta, Elisabeth Wood, and Krishna V. Subbarao

Verticillium dahliae is a soilborne fungal pathogen that causes wilt diseases and devastating losses in many important crops ( Klosterman et al., 2009 ). The resting structures produced by V. dahliae , known as microsclerotia, can survive in soil

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Germán V. Sandoya, Krishna Subbarao, and Ryan Hayes

Verticillium wilt is a destructive disease of lettuce ( Lactuca sativa L.) in the Salinas Valley of California, a region that accounts for 50% of the U.S. lettuce production ( Monterey County Crop Report, 2012 ). The disease is caused by the

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Na Liu, Baoli Zhou, Xin Zhao, Bo Lu, Yixiu Li, and Jing Hao

Eggplant ( Solanum melongena L.) is a major vegetable crop worldwide. Considerable yield loss under continuous monocropping in commercial eggplant production is often caused by soilborne diseases, particularly verticillium wilt (caused by

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Stephen R. King, Angela R. Davis, Wenge Liu, and Amnon Levi

), and because of the compatibility of tomato rootstocks with other solanaceous crops, fusarium wilt in these other crops would likely be controlled by grafting. Verticillium dahliae Kleb. is another common soilborne pathogen that can be effectively

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Pinki Devi, Penelope Perkins-Veazie, and Carol A. Miles

Watermelon ( Citrullus lanatus ) production is limited by verticillium wilt (caused by Verticillium dahliae ) throughout Washington State, and in western Washington where watermelon are produced on a small scale for direct marketing, production is

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Asmita Nagila, Soum Sanogo, O. John Idowu, and Brian J. Schutte

watered with a sprinkler canister daily and fertilized once at the 10-leaf stage with 5N–4.4P–8.3K fertilizer. Plants were monitored for symptoms of Verticillium wilt every 7 d. Verticillium wilt is caused by a soil-borne fungus, Verticillium dahliae . It