Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 90 items for :

  • Cercis canadensis x
Clear All

Ethephon and ethylene gas applied to intact Eastern redbud seed induced germination in 44 or 53% of dormant seed. However, endogenous ethylene production was not found to be correlated with the release from dormancy during chilling stratification (5°C). Seeds stratified in the presence of 6000 ppm 2.5-norbomadicne germinated at the same percentage as control seeds. Isolated embryos treated with 100 to 500 μM AOA or 1000 μM silver thiosulfate germinated at a slower rate than control seeds, but the release from dormancy during stratification was unaffected by either ethylene inhibitor. Ethylene evolution, ACC and MACC content remained at a low level throughout stratification. EFE activity was not detectable in hydrated dormant or non-dormant seed. All ethylene parameters measured increased sharply during germination with peak activity correlated with radicle emergence. These data indicated that ethylene production was linked to germination, but unrelated to dormancy release in Eastern redbud seed.

Free access

al., 2002 ; Fritsch et al., 2009 ; Robertson, 1976 ). Cercis canadensis (eastern redbud) is a small tree native to the eastern half of the United States and is widely cultivated in the United States, with more than three dozen cultivars available

Free access

species ( Davis et al., 2002 ; Fritsch et al., 2009 ), which can be found in North America ( C. canadensis L., Cercis occidentalis Torr. ex A. Gray), Asia ( C. chinensis Bunge, Cercis chingii Chun, Cercis chuniana P.F. Metcalf, Cercis gigantea W

Free access

Department of Agriculture. Species used in this study: Acer xfreemanii `Jeffersred' (Autumn Blaze® maple), Cercis canadensis L. (Eastern redbud), Malus `Prairifire' (Prairifire crabapple), Quercus rubra L. (Northern red oak)

Free access

research was to determine if three common turfgrass species used throughout the southern Great Plains inhibit establishment and growth of eastern redbud ( Cercis canadensis ) and pecan ( Carya illinoinensis ). Eastern redbud was selected due to its

Free access

containers HortScience 6 400 401 Griffin, J.J. Ranney, T.G. Pharr, D.M. 2004 Heat and drought influence photosynthesis, water relations, and soluble carbohydrates of two ecotypes of redbud ( Cercis canadensis ) J. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 129 497 502 Ham, J

Free access

Abstract

Nodules from 13 woody plant species were analyzed by an acetylene reduction assay to determine their nitrogen fixation activity. Acetylene reduction activity was found with nodules from Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn., Caragana arborescens Lam., Elaeagnus angusti/olia L., E. umbellata Thunb., Hippophae rhamnoides L., Myrica pensylvanica Lois, Robinia fertilis Ashe., R. hispida L., R. pseudoacacia L., Shepherdia argentea Nutt., and S. canadensis Nutt. In addition, nodules from A. glutinosa were found to reduce acetylene for at least 9 hours after having been excised from the plant No active nodules were found on Comptonia peregrina (L.) Coult. or Cercis canadensis L.

Open Access

Redbud (Cercis canadensis) is a small woody ornamental legume that has a hard seed coat, which imposes physical dormancy, typical of many legumes. Redbud also possesses an internal embryo dormancy that must be overcome by stratification. In order to observe the relationship between anatomy and germination, seeds were embedded in JB-4 resin during various developmental and germination stages. The seeds were cut longitudinally with a glass bladed microtome, to observe the radicle, vascular traces and testa. It appears that the vascular traces left from the funiculus serve as a weak point in non-dormant seeds that allows the radicle to rupture the testa during germination.

Free access

The objective of this study was to compare the structure and efficacy in terms of retarding cuticular transpiration of leaf cuticles from eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis L.) and dull-leaf and glossy-leaf Mexican redbud [Cercis canadensis var. mexicana (Rose) M. Hopk.]. Leaves of Mexican redbud exhibited several xeromorphic characteristics compared to eastern redbud: a smaller, thicker leaf with thicker cuticles, more cuticular wax, a higher specific leaf mass, and greater hydrated water content on a leaf area basis. Mexican redbuds with a glossy leaf differed from those with a dull leaf only in a thicker adaxial cuticle lacking wax crystallite on the surface. Epicuticular wax crystallite were present on the abaxial surface of all leaves examined. Detached leaves of eastern redbud had a higher water loss rate than those of Mexican redbud only on a dry mass basis, not on a leaf area basis. There was no difference in the rate of water loss by detached leaves of glossy-leaf and dull-leaf Mexican redbuds after 4 hours.

Free access
Author:

Mexican redbud (Cercis canadensis var. mexicana) plants exhibit leaf phenotypes with either a thin, dull cuticle or a thick, glossy cuticle. We compared leaf and cuticular structure of greenhouse-grown Eastern redbud (Cercis canadensis) (ER), Dull Mexican redbud (DMR), and Glossy Mexican redbud (GMR) seedlings via scanning electron microscopy. Mexican redbud leaves were almost twice as thick as ER and had a multilayered palisade parenchyma common among arid land plants. Both the lower (adaxial) and upper (abaxial) cuticles of MR were significantly thicker than those of ER. The surface of the upper cuticle in ER and DMR was covered with blocky crystalline structures. The surface of the upper cuticle in GMR was smooth. There was no difference in lower cuticle thickness or leaf thickness between DMR and GMR. The upper cuticle of GMR was significantly thicker than that of DMR. Mature DMR and GMR growing in a landscape in El Paso, Texas, had similar characteristics. Detached leaves of ER lost water at a significantly greater rate than did either DMR or GMR. There was no significant difference in water loss rates by detached leaves of DMR and GMR.

Free access