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graft-take of grafted cucumber transplants during healing and acclimatization Hort. Environ. Biotechnol. 52 331 338 Johkan, M. Oda, M. Mori, G. 2008 Ascorbic acid promotes graft-take in sweet pepper plants ( Capsicum annuum L.) Scientia Hort. 116 343

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Soil conditions may not be adequate for uniform yields when perennial pasture is converted to vegetable production. This occurred with `Pip' bell pepper (Capsicum annuum var. annuum L.) planted in a 0.17-acre field 3 years after conversion from perennial pasture. Depths of the A-horizon and pH levels, as well as concentrations of N, P, and K were variable throughout the field when sampled after the last harvest. Marketable yields from plots established in the field ranged from 4.1 to 14.5 tons/acre. The A-horizon depth, soil pH, and residual N, P, and K levels were correlated with yield at specific A-horizon depths and pH levels. An intensive soil-testing regime likely will be required so that nutrient levels can be maintained to support bell pepper production on soil converted from perennial pasture.

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by two pepper species Weed Sci. 32 258 263 Baltazar, A.M. Monaco, T.J. Peele, D.M. 1984 Bentazon selectivity in hot pepper ( Capsicum chinense ) and sweet pepper ( Capsicum annuum ) Weed Sci. 32 243 246 Cavero, J. Zaragoza, C. Gil-Ortega, R. 1996

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Field studies were conducted in Spring 1991, 1992, and 1993 to determine if stand deficiencies of 10%, 20%, or 30% affected bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) yield and fruit size. Subsequent replanting to a 100% stand and timing of replanting also were evaluated for effects on fruit yield. Stand deficiencies of up to 30% and replanting to a complete stand 2 or 3 weeks after initial transplanting did not affect yield per acre and average weight per fruit of bell pepper plants grown on polyethylene-mulched beds during 3 years of tests. Bell pepper plants grown in 10%, 20%, or 30% deficient stand had greater marketable yield per plant than plants grown in 100% stand. Replanting to a complete stand 3 weeks after initial transplanting decreased early marketable yield and production per plant over replanting 2 weeks after initial transplanting.

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The effects of fertilizer rates and application frequency on drip-irrigated bell peppers (Capsicum annuum L.) were evaluated at two sites in 1992 and one site in 1993 in southern New Jersey. Yield and fruit quality were greatest with 158N-69P-131K lb/acre at the site with a sandy loam soil. Yield and fruit quality responded to additional fertilizer at sites with loamy sand soils. Average marketable fruit weight increased with increasing fertilization rate at one of the two loamy sand sites. The incidence of sun scald decreased with increasing fertilization rate. Increasing the frequency of drip-applied fertilizer from 11 to 22 days did not affect yield or fruit quality in either year when the same amount of fertilizer was applied. These results show that maximizing the yield of bell peppers grown on loamy sand soils in New Jersey may require higher fertilization rates than previously recommended.

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Areca palms [Dypsis lutescens (H. Wendl.) Beentje & J. Dransf.], spathiphyllums (Spathiphyllum Schott. `Figaro'), ixoras (Ixora L. `Nora Grant'), tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. `Floramerica'), marigolds (Tagetes erecta L. `Inca Gold'), bell peppers (Capsicum annuum L. `Better Bell'), and pentas [Pentas lanceolata (Forssk.) Deflers. `Cranberry'] were grown in a pine bark-based potting substrate and were fertilized weekly with 0, 8, 16, 32, or 64 mg (1.0 oz = 28,350 mg) of P per pot. Shoot, and to a much lesser extent, root dry weight, increased for all species as weekly P fertilization rate was increased from 0 to 8 mg/pot. As P fertilization was increased from 8 to 64 mg/pot, neither roots nor shoots of most species showed any additional growth in response to increased P. Root to shoot ratio decreased sharply as P fertilization rate was increased from 0 to 8 mg/pot, but remained relatively constant in response to further increases in P fertilization rate.

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The effect on crop yield of drip-irrigation frequencies of two irrigations per day (2/d), one irrigation per day (1/d), two irrigations per week (2/week), and one irrigation per week (1/week) was investigated for lettuce (Lactuca sativa), pepper (Capsicum annuum), and onion (Allium cepa) grown on sandy loam and processing tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) grown on silt loam during experiments conducted during 1994 to 1997. All treatments of a particular crop received the same amount of irrigation water per week. Results showed that the 1/week frequency should be avoided for the shallow rooted crops in sandy soil. Irrigation frequency had little effect on yield of tomato, a relatively deep-rooted crop. These results suggest that drip irrigation frequencies of 1/d or 2/week are appropriate in medium to fine texture soils for the soil and climate of the project site. There was no yield benefit of multiple irrigations per day.

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The efficacy and cost efficiency of using various plastic soil mulches in the production of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.), corn (Zea mays L.) and muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) were examined over four growing seasons in Saskatchewan, Canada. Clear mulch with or without preemergent herbicides was compared with black or wavelength selective mulches. In all three crops, mulches enhanced yields relative to bare ground in most site-year combinations. Clear mulch usually produced the highest yields. Herbicides applied under the clear plastic provided effective weed control with no observable changes in product efficacy or toxicity to the crop. The weed control provided by the herbicides had no effect on yields in the clear mulch treatments. Consequently, clear mulch without added herbicide usually represented the most cost-effective production option for all three crops.

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One method of plant freeze protection involves the application of compounds that promote freeze avoidance or tolerance. FreezePruf, a commercially available product recently marketed to improve both freeze avoidance and tolerance, contains polyethylene glycol, potassium silicate, glycerol, silicone polyether surfactant, and a bicyclic oxazolidine antidessicant. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the protection level provided by FreezePruf using laboratory-based methods involving plants and plant parts from species capable and incapable of low-temperature acclimation. FreezePruf did not lower the freezing temperature of pepper (Capsicum annuum) seedlings, celosia (Celosia argentea) seedlings, detached tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaves, or postharvest tomato fruit. Spray application of the putative cryoprotectant did not increase the freeze tolerance of bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) crowns or stolons. It is possible that a greater level of protection could be achieved with other species or different experimental protocols.

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Solar-heated, passively ventilated, plastic or mesh-coated high tunnels are being increasingly adopted by growers of tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ) and sweet pepper (nonpungent Capsicum annuum ) in temperate and tropical regions worldwide

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