Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 70 items for :

  • "wood fiber" x
Clear All
Full access

Tongyin Li, Guihong Bi, Genhua Niu, Susmitha S. Nambuthiri, Robert L. Geneve, Xueni Wang, R. Thomas Fernandez, Youping Sun and Xiaojie Zhao

rice straw containers ( Kuehny et al., 2011 ). ‘Rainier Purple’ cyclamen ( Cyclamen persicum ) plants had higher dry root weights when grown in paper and wood fiber containers than those grown in plastic containers ( Beeks and Evans, 2013a ). For some

Free access

Brian E. Jackson, Robert D. Wright and Michael C. Barnes

; Raviv and Lieth, 2008 ; Schilling, 1999 ; Nazim Gruda, personal communication, 2007). Gerber et al. (1999) demonstrated that geranium ( Pelargonium × hortorum L.H. Bailey) could be grown in a 100% wood fiber substrate with similar growth to plants

Free access

Lesley A. Judd, Brian E. Jackson, Ted C. Yap and William C. Fonteno

.H. 2004a Suitability of wood fiber substrate for production of vegetable transplants. I. Physical properties of wood fiber substrates Sci. Hort. 100 309 322 Gruda, N. Schnitzler, W.H. 2004b Suitability of wood fiber substrates for production of vegetable

Full access

Renee Conneway, Sven Verlinden, Andrew K. Koeser, Michael Evans, Rebecca Schnelle, Victoria Anderson and J. Ryan Stewart

) peat, (F) sleeve (bioplastic), (G) slotted rice hull, (H) solid rice hull, (I) straw, and (J) wood fiber. Experimental design, growing conditions, and plant care. Two species, impatiens and lavender, were selected as representative short- and long

Free access

Linda L. Taylor, Alexander X. Niemiera, Robert D. Wright and J. Roger Harris

Gruda, N. Schnitzler, W.H. 2004 Suitability of wood-fiber substrate for production of vegetable transplants. I. Physical properties of wood fiber substrates Sci. Hort. 100 309 322 Gruda, N. Tucher, S.V. Schnitzler, W.H. 2000 N-immobilization of wood

Full access

containers to bioplastic, solid ricehull, slotted ricehull, paper, peat, dairy manure, wood fiber, rice straw, or coconut fiber containers. All containers except the rice straw produced plants with more dry weight than plastic. Provenance and Frost

Full access

Robert D. Wright, Brian E. Jackson, Jake F. Browder and Joyce G. Latimer

the cultivation of tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ) seedlings in a wood fiber substrate resulted in growth equal to plants grown in peat. Fig. 1. Shoot dry weight and growth index [(height + widest width + perpendicular width)/3] of chrysanthemum ‘Baton

Full access

Ellen T. Paparozzi

decreases, and powdery mildew will start to appear in pots and on leaves. So, while daily hand watering was not needed, we still scouted the plants. Also, in our quest for sustainability, the first year, we potted up one pot in each replication with wood

Full access

Rhuanito Soranz Ferrarezi, Geoffrey Matthew Weaver, Marc W. van Iersel and Roberto Testezlaf

persicum ) using ebb-and-flow benches over a 15-week production cycle. Shoot dry weight was greater in all biocontainers than in the plastic control pots, with the exception of wood fiber containers. Plants grown in the wood fiber containers had reduced dry

Full access

Dewayne L. Ingram, Charles R. Hall and Joshua Knight

-cm height, and weight of 34 g. A substrate (60% horticulture grade peat: 40% wood fiber by volume) was mixed using a mechanical system powered by electric motors at 15 kW and was in use 1.8 h to fill 1000 containers. A four-person crew filled