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Renata L. Solan, Jed B. Colquhoun, Richard A. Rittmeyer and Daniel J. Heider

crop, thus increasing the competitive ability of a plant ( Goldberg, 1990 ; Jordan, 1993 ). Weed suppression, or crop interference, may be more effective than weed tolerance because the suppressive ability of a crop reduces the weed population, whereas

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Raymond Kruse and Ajay Nair

tillage and herbicides and offer additional benefits to the soil and environment while also increasing or maintaining vegetable yield ( Kumar et al., 2009 ). Studies have reported successful weed suppression using cover crops ( Bugg and Dutcher, 1989

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Michelle L. Infante and Ronald D. Morse

Experiments were conducted with `BigSur' broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) at two sites in Fall 1993 and at two sites in Spring 1994 on a Hayter loam in southwestern Virginia. Our objectives were to determine the effects of tillage main plots (conventional tillage = CT and no tillage = NT) and weed control subplots [no overseeding or preemergent herbicide, oxyfluorofen, red clover (Trifolium pratense L.), `Dutch' white clover (Trifolium repens L.), and hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth)] on broccoli yield and weed suppression. In all sites, weed suppression and marketable broccoli yield with NT were equal to or higher than with CT. Overseeded legume living mulches did not affect broccoli yield in any site compared to the control plots and suppressed weeds as well as the oxyfluorofen in three of the four sites. Thus, the NT systems used in these experiments can suppress weeds and produce high broccoli yields. Also, overseeded legume living mulches can be established effectively after transplanting to suppress weeds without reducing broccoli yield. Chemical name used: 2-choro-1-(3-ethoxy-4-nitrophenoxy)-4-(trifluoromethyl) benzene (oxyfluorofen).

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Julia Whitworth

Rye, wheat, and crimson clover were planted in separate pots outdoors in the fall of 1992 and 1993 Control pots had media without plants in them. There were 4 replications in 1992 and 9 in 1993. In early spring. the rye, wheat, and crimson clover were killed, using tillage in 1992 and glyphosate in 1993. In 1992. the residues were tilled into the media. In 1993, the residues were left on the surface. `Cardinal' strawberries, yellow nutsedge nutlets, crabgrass seeds, or bermudagrass rhizomes were planted into pots with the various residues, and also into the control pots. In July of 1992 and August-September of 1993, the weeds and strawberry plants were removed from the pots. Various growth measurements were taken on the plants. None of the tilled residues affected the growth of nutsedge or crabgrass, but tilled rye and wheat residues increased the growth of strawberry plants and decreased the growth of bermudagrass. None of the residues left on the surface significantly affected the growth of crabgrass. Clover residues suppressed nutsedge growth Both strawberry and bermudagrass growth was greatly reduced by all surface residues

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P.L. Preusch and T.J. Tworkoski

Improper management of poultry manure and bedding (litter) can cause hypoxia in aquatic communities, but poultry waste can be converted to a stable organic fertilizer by composting. Peach trees (Prunus persica L. `Sunhigh') received the following treatments in May 1998: commercial fertilizer (15 g N/m2), low-rate composted poultry litter (15 g N/m2 as 2.9 kg composted litter/m2), high-rate composted poultry litter (62 g N/m2 as 11.6 kg composted litter/m2), and no treatment control. Weeds were completely controlled during 1998, but, by Sept. 1999, the high-rate poultry litter had only 27% weed cover compared with 86% for the commercial fertilizer-treated plots. Soil N was highest in plots treated with commercial fertilizer (16.4 mg N-NH4 and 18.6 mg N-NO3 per kg soil, 6 weeks after treatment) and did not differ among the remaining treatments (in the high rate of poultry litter—3.2 mg N-NH4 and 0.7 mg N-NO3 per kg soil, 6 weeks after treatment). Water soluble P in the soil did not differ among treatments at 6 weeks after treatment (≈12 mg P per kg soil for all treatments) but, at 47 weeks after treatment, plots with the high rate of poultry litter had 30 mg P per kg soil compared with 14 mg P per kg soil in plots treated with commercial fertilizer. In general, Mehlich 1 acid-soluble P did not differ among the litter- and fertilizer-treated plots (averaging 45 mg P per kg soil). Acid-soluble P was lowest in control plots (averaging 21 mg P per kg soil). Results indicate that poultry litter could be used as a weed suppressant without adversely affecting nitrogen release to the environment. However, P mineralization may be problematic and requires further investigation.

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P.L. Preusch and T.J. Tworkoski

Composted poultry litter (CPL) may be applied as a mulch in fruit orchards to manage waste and to provide a slow-release nutrient source and weed control. With proper management, poultry manure and bedding (litter) can prevent environmental degradation, such as hypoxia in aquatic communities. Peach (Prunus persica L. `Sunhigh') plots all received preemergence herbicides in May and then the following treatments in June 1998: commercial fertilizer (N at 15 g·m-2), low rate CPL (N at 15 g·m-2 as CPL at 2.9 kg·m-2), high rate CPL (N at 62 g·m-2 as CPL at 11.6 kg·m-2), and no fertilizer or mulch control. Weeds were completely controlled by mulch and herbicide during 1998 but not during 1999. By Sept. 1999, the high rate of CPL had only 27% weed cover compared with 86% for the commercial fertilizer-treated plots. Soil N was highest (NH4-N and NO3-N at 16.4 and 18.6 mg·kg-1 soil, respectively) in plots treated with commercial fertilizer, 6 weeks after treatment (WAT). Soil N did not differ among the two CPL treatments and the control at any time. At the high rate of CPL, there was NH4-N and NO3-N at 3.2 and 0.7 mg·kg-1 soil, respectively, at 6 WAT. Water-extractable P (WEP) in the soil did not differ among the CPL and commercial fertilizer treatments at 6 WAT (P at §14 mg·kg-1 soil). However, at 47 WAT, plots with the high rate of CPL had significantly higher WEP, with P at 30 mg·kg-1 soil vs. 14 mg·kg-1 soil in plots treated with commercial fertilizer. High applications of CPL could elevate P in surface runoff to levels that cause environmental degradation. In general, Mehlich 1-extractable P (MEP) did not differ among the CPL- and fertilizer-treated plots (averaging P at 45 mg·kg-1 soil). MEP was lowest in control plots (averaging P at 21 mg·kg-1 soil). Results indicate that CPL could be used as a weed suppressant without adversely affecting N release to the environment; however, P concentration in soil water may be problematic.

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Mathieu Ngouajio and Milton E. McGiffen Jr.

Organic agriculture is growing in importance worldwide. In the United States, the rate of increase of organic growers was estimated at 12% in 2000. However, many producers are reluctant to undertake the organic transition because of uncertainty of how organic production will affect weed population dynamics and management. The organic transition has a profound impact on the agroecosystem. Changes in soil physical and chemical properties during the transition often impact indirectly insect, disease, and weed dynamics. Greater weed species richness is usually found in organic farms but total weed density and biomass are often smaller under the organic system compared with the conventional system. The improved weed suppression of organic agriculture is probably the result of combined effects of several factors including weed seed predation by soil microorganisms, seedling predation by phytophagus insects, and the physical and allelopathic effects of cover crops.

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Howard F. Harrison, Judy A. Thies, Richard L. Fery and J. Powell Smith

A preliminary screening experiment was conducted to evaluate 47 cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] genotypes for use as a weed-suppressing cover crop. Of these, 11 were selected for further testing on the basis of vigorous growth and weed-suppressing ability. In a field experiment repeated over 4 years, the selected genotypes were not different from the leading cover crop cultivar `Iron Clay' in biomass production. Vigor ratings, vine growth ratings, and canopy widths of some genotypes exceeded those of `Iron Clay' Vigor ratings and canopy measurements were efficient selection criteria that could be useful for breeding cover crop cowpea cultivars. All except one selection were highly resistant to southern root knot nematode [Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid and White) Chitwood], and the selections varied in seed size, photoperiod, and response to foliar diseases.

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Nancy G. Creamer, Mark A. Bennett and Benjamin R. Stinner

Planting polyculture mixtures of cover crops can optimize the benefits of their use. Thirteen polyculture mixtures of cover crops were evaluated in Columbus and Fremont, Ohio, to find a species mix that would establish quickly for erosion control, overwinter in Ohio, contribute sufficient N and have a C : N ratio between 20:1 and 30:1 to optimize N availability for subsequent crops, be killable by mechanical methods, and have high weed control potential. All of the mixtures in Columbus had achieved 30% ground cover 1 month after planting, but only four of the mixtures achieved this in Fremont due to poor conditions at planting. Above-ground biomass (AGB) accumulation in the mixtures ranged from 3631 to 13,642 kg·ha-1 in Columbus, and 449 to 12,478 kg·ha-1 in Fremont. Nitrogen in the AGB ranged from 74 to 269 kg·ha-1 in Columbus, and 10 to 170 kg·ha-1 in Fremont. Weed cover in the cover crop plots ranged from 1% to 91% eight weeks after cover crop kill in Columbus, and 12% to 90% seven weeks after cover crop kill in Fremont. Because one or more species in each screened mixture was determined not to be suitable, none of the mixtures was optimum. However, information gained about performance of individual species within the mixtures is also useful. `Nitro' alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.), ladino clover (Trifolium repense L.), subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum L.), Austrian winter peas [Pisum sativum ssp. Arvense (L.) Poir], and annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) did not overwinter dependably in Ohio. Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea L.), perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), and orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) did not compete well with taller, more vigorous species, and were not persistent in the mixtures. Medium and mammoth red clover (Trifolium pratense L.), annual and perennial ryegrass, and white and yellow blossom sweetclover [Melilotus alba Desr., and Melilotus officianalis (L). Desr.], were not killable by mechanical methods. Individual species that established quickly, were competitive in the mixtures, overwintered dependably, and were killed by mechanical methods were rye (Secale cereale L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum L.), and hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth.)

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Howard F. Harrison, D. Michael Jackson, Anthony P. Keinath, Paul C. Marino and Thomas Pullaro

Fall transplanted `Commander' broccoli (Brassica oleracea Botrytis group) yield in mulches formed from the residues of killed cowpea (Vigna unquiculata), soybean (Glycine max), and velvetbean (Mucuna pruriens) cover crops was compared to yield in conventional production on bare soil. Average aboveground biomass production was 6.9, 7.7, and 5.9 t·ha-1 (3.08, 3.43, and 2.63 tons/acre) and total nitrogen content of the aboveground tissues was 2.9%, 2.8%, and 2.7% of the dry weight for cowpea, soybean, and velvetbean, respectively. Within each cover crop mulch main plot, subplots received different nitrogen rates, [0, 84.1, or 168.1 kg·ha-1 (0, 75, or 150 lb/acre)]. For several nitrogen level × year comparisons, broccoli grown in mulched plots yielded higher than broccoli grown on bare soil plots. Cowpea and soybean mulches promoted broccoli growth more than velvetbean mulch. The mulches of all three species persisted through the growing season and suppressed annual weeds.