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Blair Buckley and Katharine C. Pee

Media contaming cotton gin trash compost, pear. and perlite were evaluated for production of bell pepper, broccoli, and cabbage transplants. Media treatments were 0:5:5; 1:4:5; 2:4:5; 3:2:5; 4:1:5; and 5:0:5 compost, peat, perlite, respectively (v/v). Separate tests were conducted for each crop. `Jupiter' pepper, `Packman' broccoli, and `Grand Slam' cabbage were seeded in 96-cell plastic trays (cell volume =39cm3). Plant height, stem diameter, and shoot and root dry weight were recorded five weeks after seeding bell pepper and broccoil, and six weeks after seeding cabbage. Pepper, broccoli, and cabbage transplants grown in media containing cotton gin trash compost had greater plant height, stem diameter, and shoot and root dry weight than transplants grown in the medium without compost as a component. The growth response to percent of compost was primarily linear.

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Jean Masson, Nicolas Tremblay and André Gosselin

This experiment was initiated to determine the effects of supplementary lighting of 100 μmol·s-1·m-2 (PAR) in combination with four N rates (100, 200, 300, and 400 mg N/liter) on growth of celery (Apium graveolens L.), lettuce (Luctuca sativa L.), broccoli (Brassica oleracea italica L.), and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) transplants in multicellular trays. Supplementary lighting, as compared with natural light alone, increased shoot dry weight of celery, lettuce, broccoli, and tomato transplants by 22%, 40%, 19%, and 24%, and root dry weight by 97%, 42%, 38%, and 21%, respectively. It also increased the percentage of shoot dry matter of broccoli and tomato, leaf area of lettuce and broccoli, and root: shoot dry weight ratio (RSDWR) of celery and broccoli. Compared with 100 mg N/liter, a N rate of 400 mg·liter-1 increased the shoot dry weight of celery, lettuce, broccoli, and tomato transplants by 37%, 38%, 61%, and 38%, respectively. High N fertilization accelerated shoot growth at the expense of root growth, except for tomato where a 16% increase of root dry weight was observed. High N also reduced percentage of shoot dry matter. Supplementary lighting appears to be a promising technique when used in combination with high N rates to improve the production of high quality transplants, particularly those sown early.

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Jean Masson, Nicolas Tremblay and André Gosselin

Transplants of celery (Apium graveolens L.), lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.), broccoli (Brassica oleracea italica L.), and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) grown in multicellular trays under natural light or with supplementary lighting of 100 μmol·s-1·m-2 (PAR) in factorial combination with four rates of N fertilization (100, 200, 300, and 400 mg•liter-1) were tested for productivity under field conditions. Celery was seeded once, lettuce twice, and broccoli and tomato three times. Broccoli and tomato were transplanted at two sites, celery and lettuce at one. Supplementary lighting had no effect on yields of celery, lettuce, and broccoli, but significantly increased yields of early seeded tomato. High rates of N fertilization (300 and 400 mg·liter-1) applied at the transplant stage improved yields for all the species.

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Ted S. Kornecki and Francisco J. Arriaga

A 4-year experiment with different tillage practices for tomatoes was conducted in Cullman, AL, to determine the impact of plastic mulch (control), rye and crimson clover cover crops, and different subsoiler shanks (no shank, slim 13 mm thick and wide 20 mm thick) on tomato yield. Overall, during 2007 and 2008 growing seasons, total tomato yields (between 58,905 and 60,115 kg·ha−1) and marketable tomato yields (between 48,331 and 49,873 kg·ha−1) were significantly higher than in 2005 and 2006 (between 49,656 and 50,151 kg·ha−1 and from 40,581 to 41,194 kg·ha−1) for total and marketable tomato yields, respectively. During the 2006 and 2008 growing seasons, plastic cover provided higher yield (60,921 and 73,718 kg·ha−1) compared with rye and crimson clover overall shank treatments. In 2007, higher yield was produced following rye without shank (70,577 kg·ha−1) compared with plastic mulch and crimson clover treatments. Across years, tomato yield after crimson clover was lower compared with rye and plastic. Percent of marketable fruit yield to total yield exceeded 80% in all treatments, including the plastic control. Cover crops and shank treatments did not affect percentage of marketable tomato yield compared with total tomato yield. Cover crops, especially rye, can provide an alternative in tomato production for those producers not wanting to use plastic mulches.

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Ajay Nair and Brandon Carpenter

quality ( Rogovska et al., 2012 ). In addition, the body of biochar research in soilless medium is far less complete with respect to identifying a suitable rate or concentration of biochar that could be used in vegetable transplant production. Also of

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Mary A. Rogers

vegetable transplant production, and point to future research needs for organic agriculture. Fig. 1. Lettuce and mustard greens growing in a vertical gutter system in soilless, organic media in a passive solar heated greenhouse at Paradox Farm, Ashby, MN

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Chengyan Yue, Jennifer H. Dennis, Bridget K. Behe, Charles R. Hall, Benjamin L. Campbell and Roberto G. Lopez

NASS, 2010 ). Products in this sector include flowering annuals (ornamental plants primarily used in outdoor landscapes) and selected food-producing plants such as vegetable transplants (e.g., tomato, pepper, and squash) and herbs (e.g., basil, parsley

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Vincent M. Russo and P. Perkins-Veazie

; Sterrett et al., 1983 ; Vavrina, 1998 ). Plant- and animal-based fertilizers have been used as amendments in vegetable transplant production ( Koller et al., 2004 ). Mycorrhizal fungi and rhizosphere bacteria are, depending on formulation, permissible

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Lucia E. Villavicencio, James A. Bethke and Lea Corkidi

, 1990 ). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of uniconazole on potted vegetable transplants. Vegetable gardening is gaining popularity ( National Gardening Association, 2009 ), and this is the only PGR that can legally be used on some