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Edmund J. Ogbuchiekwe, Milton E. McGiffen Jr. and Mathieu Ngouajio

Economic analysis compared the returns of cropping systems and management practices for production of fall lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and spring cantaloupe (Cucumis melo) following summer cover crops. The cover crop treatments included: cowpea [Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp.] incorporated into the soil in the fall, cowpea used as mulch in the fall, sorghum sudangrass [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] incorporated into the soil in the fall, and a bare ground control. Lettuce and cantaloupe were managed using conventional, integrated, and organic practices. The effect of each cropping system and management practice on crop yield, cost of production and net return was determined. In 1999 and 2000, yield and net return were greatest for cantaloupe and lettuce when the cowpea cover crop was incorporated into the soil before planting. The effect of crop management practice varied with type of cover crop. When lettuce was planted into cowpea-incorporated treatment in 1999, conventional management had the highest cash return followed by integrated crop management. In 2000, organically-grown lettuce after cowpea incorporated had the highest net return followed by integrated crop management grown under cowpea incorporated treatments. In 1999 and 2000, integrated cantaloupe following cowpea-incorporated treatment had the highest yield and cash-return. A 20% price premium for organic produce increased the net returns for the organic-grown lettuce and cantaloupe. Organic lettuce following cowpea-incorporated treatments produced a high net of $2,516/ha in 1999 and $5,971/ha in 2000. The net returns due to 20% organic premium price varied between 1999 and 2000 in cantaloupe production. They were highest for organic cantaloupe after bareground with a net return of $4,395 in 1999 and $3,148 in 2000 for organic cantaloupe after sudangrass.

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Hayk Khachatryan, Ben Campbell, Charles Hall, Bridget Behe, Chengyan Yue and Jennifer Dennis

for assessing the relationship between consumer demand and environmentally friendly goods is investigating the WTP price premiums for underlying product attributes. Previous literature has mainly focused on the effects of product attributes or

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Tiffany L. Maughan, Kynda R. Curtis, Brent L. Black and Daniel T. Drost

roadside stands to avoid competing with lower wholesale prices ( Gunter et al., 2012 ; Yeager, 2013 ). Consumers are willing to pay price premiums for local foods at direct markets, especially when available outside of the normal season, providing growers

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Phillip M. Mohebalian, Francisco X. Aguilar and Mihaela M. Cernusca

adapted from the U.S. Census Bureau (2000 ). The potential market shares for jelly and juice products for two different scenarios were estimated based on specific marginal effects of incremental price premiums as performed by Aguilar and Cai (2010) and

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Chengyan Yue, Terry Hurley and Neil O. Anderson

consumer willingness to pay (WTP) for ornamental plants with native and invasive labeling. The results show that, on average, consumers were willing to pay a price premium for plants that were labeled as non-invasive and native and they discounted plants

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Olya Rysin and Frank J. Louws

prices. Table 4. Additional yield per plant required in the grafted system to compensate for various grafted transplant price premiums at various sale price levels presented on a per plant basis. Table 4 rows represent various possible price premiums for

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variety to maintain price premiums and profit margins. Gallardo et al. (p. 575) estimated the impact of inadequate crop load management on grower profits using two methodologies: hedonic pricing model and price incentive compatible experimental auction

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Chengyan Yue and Cindy Tong

tomatoes. Price premium for local and organic attributes. The intercept and coefficients of organic, local, price, and organic*local were highly significant. The negative sign of the coefficient of price indicated that the higher the price of the product

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Paul B. Francis and C. Robert Stark, Jr.

Consumer demand for heirloom and organically grown local produce is increasing and market price premiums associated with these value-added characteristics may provide profitable ventures. The increased popularity of heirloom tomatoes ( Solanum

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Daniel Rowley, Brent L. Black, Dan Drost and Dillon Feuz

on local markets and marketing strategies. It has been suggested that out-of-season fruit can command a price premium of double the regular in-season price for local produce ( Koester and Pritts, 2003 ). Fruit produced in this study was sold through