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James E. Altland and Kay Yeon Jeong

Ground pine bark pH ranges from 4.1 to 5.1 before amendment with other components or fertilizers ( Brown and Pokorny, 1975 ; Gillman et al., 1998 ; Wright et al., 1999a , 1999b ). Limestone is traditionally used to raise the pH of pine bark

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Jinsheng Huang, Paul R. Fisher and William R. Argo

” (ECC), calculated as a ratio of neutralizing value compared with CaCO 3 , quantifies the combined effects of particle size distribution and acid neutralizing value (NV) of a limestone on pH response, calculated as: PSE values have been defined

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Ka Yeon Jeong, Paul V. Nelson, Carl E. Niedziela Jr. and David A. Dickey

It is relatively easy to set the initial target pH of a root substrate by matching lime type and rate with the acidity of the substrate components. The challenge lies in maintaining this target pH throughout crop production. Factors that impact pH

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Christopher S. Imler, Camila I. Arzola and Gerardo H. Nunez

Soil pH is a major factor mediating plant agricultural performance. Plants in family Ericaceae (i.e., acid-loving plants) thrive in acidic soils (pH 4.2–5.5) where NH 4 + is the most abundant form of N ( Marrs and Bannister, 1978 ). When acid

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Jared Barnes, Paul Nelson, Brian E. Whipker, David A. Dickey, Dean Hesterberg and Wei Shi

Substrate pH, the activity of free protons (H + ) in aqueous solution, has been of concern to horticulturists for years because it has a pronounced effect on nutrient availability ( Sparks, 2003 ), and it gives insight into plant rhizosphere

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Khalid F. Almutairi, Rui M.A. Machado, David R. Bryla and Bernadine C. Strik

Northern highbush blueberry ( Vaccinium corymbosum L.) is adapted to acidic soil conditions and is often most productive at soil pH between 4.5 and 5.5 ( Retamales and Hancock, 2012 ). To grow blueberry at sites with a higher initial soil pH

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Todd C. Wehner, Rachel P. Naegele and Penelope Perkins-Veazie

directly evaluated in watermelon to date. Watermelon breeding has resulted in a diversity of fruit sizes, rind color, rind patterns, and flesh color. Most cultivars have soluble solids content (°Brix) between 8% and 15% and acidity (flesh pH) of 5

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Bryan J. Peterson and William R. Graves

health. Responses of D. palustris to pH of substrates used for horticultural production are unknown, and discrepancies exist in the reported pH affinities of the species in the wild. Del Tredici (1984) reported that D. palustris performs best in

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Michael V. Mickelbart, Michael J. Gosney, James Camberato and Kelly M. Stanton

species are mainly used in habitat restoration. Spiraea alba is also attractive to arthropod natural enemies and has been suggested as an important native species for habitat management ( Fielder and Landis, 2007 ). Soil pH greatly affects the

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Timothy K. Broschat

use N in the process ( Ashworth and Harrison, 1983 ). Billeaud and Zajicek (1989) and Sonsteby et al. (2004) found that soil N in mulched plots was lower than in unmulched plots. Brown (1996) , as well as Tukey and Schoff (1963) , compared pH and