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Matthew B. Bertucci, Katherine M. Jennings, David W. Monks, Jonathan R. Schultheis, Penelope Perkins-Veazie, Frank J. Louws and David L. Jordan

fruit quality . A two-fruit sample from the initial two harvests in each year was tested for flesh firmness, soluble solids content, pH, and lycopene content. Flesh firmness was measured using a digital force gauge (Force One FDIX; Wagner Instruments

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Nikolaos Koutinas, Thomas Sotiropoulos, Antonios Petridis, Dimitrios Almaliotis, Emmanuil Deligeorgis, Ioannis Therios and Nikolaos Voulgarakis

weight, flesh firmness (measured by an Effegi penetrometer 8-mm tip; Effegi, Milan, Italy), total soluble solids (measured with the Atago PR-1 electronic refractometer; Atago Co., Ltd., Tokyo, Japan), total titratable acidity [after titration with 0.1 N

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Steven J. McArtney, John D. Obermiller, Tom Hoyt and Michael L. Parker

room at 0 °C. Samples two and three were held in the same room at 0 °C in ambient atmosphere after postharvest 1-MCP treatment for 30 d and then held at 20 °C for 7 d before measuring internal ethylene concentration (IEC) and flesh firmness. IEC was

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Hiroshi Iwanami, Shigeki Moriya, Nobuhiro Kotoda and Kazuyuki Abe

. Parentage and fruit characteristics at harvest in 27 cultivars evaluated in this study. Measurement of flesh firmness, mealiness, and turgor. Flesh firmness was measured using a penetrometer (FT327; McCormick Fruit Technology, Yakima, WA

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C.B. Watkins and F.W. Liu

2 (in 2% O 2 ) at 0 °C; 0, 3, and 5 kPa at 3 °C; and 0, 3, and 5 kPa at 5 °C. Each jar of fruit was kept at the desired storage temperature overnight before being exposed to the CA treatments as described subsequently. Flesh firmness and the starch

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Yahya K. Al-Hinai and Teryl R. Roper

The effect of rootstock on apple size is not clear due to inconsistent results of published studies. This study was conducted over 3 years at the Peninsular Agricultural Research Station near Sturgeon Bay, WI on 6-year-old `Gala' apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh) grafted on Malling 26 (M.26), Ottawa 3, M.9 Pajam 1, and Vineland (V)-605 rootstocks. Fruit diameter was measured weekly. Fruit weight and volume were estimated by a quadratic regression of weekly measurements. Fruit weight was positively correlated with fruit volume. Rootstock had no effect on fruit growth and final size even with the removal of crop load effects. Crop load was a highly significant covariate for fruit size, but canopy light interception and seed count were not. Trees on M.26 EMLA had slightly higher yield in 2000 but rootstock did not affect yield efficiency any year. Rootstock had no influence on fruit quality attributes during 2001; however, in 2002, fruit obtained from trees on Pajam-1 tended to be less firm. Generally, apple fruit size was influenced by crop load and other factors, but not by rootstock.

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Yahya K. Al-Hinai and Teryl R. Roper

The effects of rootstock on growth of fruit cell number and size of `Gala' apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh) were investigated over three consecutive seasons (2000-02) growing on Malling 26 (M.26), Ottawa-3, Pajam-1, and Vineland (V)-605 rootstocks at the Peninsular Agricultural Research Station near Sturgeon Bay, WI. Fruit growth as a function of cell division and expansion was monitored from full bloom until harvest using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Cell count and cell size measurements showed that rootstock had no affect on fruit growth and final size even when crop load effects were removed. Cell division ceased about 5 to 6 weeks after full bloom (WAFB) followed by cell expansion. Fruit size was positively correlated (r 2 = 0.85) with cell size, suggesting that differences in fruit size were primarily a result of changes in cell size rather than cell number or intercellular space (IS).

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Ming-Wei S. Kao, Jeffrey K. Brecht, Jeffrey G. Williamson and Donald J. Huber

Melting and NMF are two main phenotypes of peach fruit and are characterized by different softening patterns in the final stage of ripening. MF cultivars carry the dominant, wild-type allele of the (M) locus that controls flesh firmness, whereas NMF

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Torrance R. Schmidt, Don C. Elfving, James R. McFerson and Matthew D. Whiting

shoot extension was unaffected. 2004 ‘Honeycrisp’ gibberellic acid 4+7 concentration trial. Treated fruit in this trial showed advanced maturity across several indices ( Table 2 ). Strong linear effects of elevated starch conversion, decreased flesh

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Duane W. Greene

each limb and taken to the laboratory for evaluation. All fruit were weighed and the circumference measured with a handheld caliper at the equator of each fruit. Flesh firmness was determined on two sides of a 10-fruit subsample using a Lake City