Search Results

You are looking at 21 - 30 of 8,971 items for :

Clear All
Free access

Henry G. Taber*, Vince Lawson and Diane Shogren

Undiluted tomato petiole sap from a variety by K rate experiment (48 treatment rep combinations) was used to measure K concentration via the battery operated portable Cardy meter and ICP laboratory instrumentation. Three sample 1998 dates, 16 July., 21 Aug., and 8 Sept., resulted in K sap readings by ICP of 3917, 2612, and 2297 ppm, respectively. At sap levels below 3000 ppm the linear Cardy:ICP correlation was r = 0.04, but above 3000 ppm only 0.53. From 3500 to 5000 ppm K the Cardy meter under estimated actual sap K by 200 to 900 ppm. For the years 1999 and 2001, tomato petiole sap at each sample date (4) was diluted 1:1 with deionized water. The linear regression equation describing the relationship between ICP and Cardy meter measurements was: Cardy K ppm = 0.733 * ICP + 685 (r = 0.92, n = 190). The Cardy meter error over the 2000 to 5000 ppm K range was 8 to 12%. Petiole sap K, measured by either Cardy or ICP, was highly correlated to whole leaf K concentration both years. But even though the slope of the regression lines was similar the intercepts were significantly different (P≤.01). The significant 0.32% K difference in whole leaf between years precluded the development of a common regression line to predict whole leaf K from Cardy petiole sap determinations. The Cardy meter can be reliably used for tomato petiole K determination provided the sap is diluted and the usual handling precautions are taken to prevent petiole moisture loss.

Free access

James M. Spiers

The effects of varying potassium and sodium fertilization levels on 'Shawnee' blackberry (Rubrus, subgenus Eubatus, spp.) plant growth and leaf elemental content were studied in sand culture experiments. Increasing K fertilizer levels linearly increased K, but decreased Mg and Zn in the leaves. Concentrations of Na, Ca, Cu. Fe, and Mn were not significantly influenced by K fertilization. Plants contained six times more Na with high than with low Na fertilization. Na fertilization did not significantly affect leaf K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Cu or Zn, but leaf Mn was linearly reduced by increasing Na fertilization. Leaf K and Na were directly influenced by the amounts of supplied K and Na. 'Shawnee' blackberries readily take up Na but exhibit some salt tolerance at low to moderate Na fertilization levels. At high Na levels, they appear to lack a mechanism to reduce Na uptake, which results in reduced plant growth.

Free access

Daniel G. Krueger Jr. and Bert T. Swanson

To increase root fibrosity, acorns of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) were germinated and subjected to several radicle clipping (+/-) and K-IBA concentration treatments combintations prior to planting. Taproots and laterals ≥ 1 mm in diameter at the point of origin were counted. Low concentrations of K-IBA (0-4000 ppm) resulted in four root morphologies: 1) a single taproot and 3-6 laterals (no clipping/no K-IBA), 2) 4-5 taproots and 1-3 laterals (clipped only), 3) a single taproot and 5-12 laterals (not clipped/K-IBA) and 4) 6-12 taproots and 1-2 laterals. High concentrations of K-IBA (4000-10,000 ppm) `clipped' unclipped radicles resulting in root systems similiar to those clipped by hand. Stem height was unaffected by treatment. Radicle-clipping may increase stem caliper. K-IBA treatments may decrease root dry weight.

Free access

Andrea L. Southworth and Michael A. Dirr

Stem cuttings from a prostrate clone of Cephalotaxus harringtonia (Forbes) K. Koch (Japanese plum yew) were taken monthly from Sept. 1994 through Aug. 1995, treated with K-IBA at 0 or 10,000 mg·liter–1, placed in a greenhouse under intermittent mist, and evaluated after 16 weeks. Cuttings taken from December to February and treated with K-IBA averaged 85% rooting, 10 roots per cutting, and a total root length of 35 cm. The next highest rooting percentages were for cuttings taken from March to May; poorest rooting occurred for cuttings taken from June to August and September to November, regardless of K-IBA application. Chemical name used: K-indole-3-butyric acid (K-IBA).

Free access

A.A. Csizinszky and D.J. Schuster

The impact of two insecticide spray application schedules (weekly or on demand), three N and K rates [1x, 1.5x, and 2x; 1x = (kg·ha-1) 130N-149K], and two transplant container cell sizes [small, 21 mm wide × 51 mm deep (7.5 cm 3), and large, 38 mm wide × 70 mm deep (33.7 cm”)] on `Market Prize' cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. Capitata group) yield was investigated in Fall and Winter 1982-83 and Spring 1983. Fenvalerate was sprayed at 0.112 kg·ha-1. For the weekly schedule, 10 sprays were applied in fall and winter and nine in spring; for the on-demand schedule, two sprays were applied in both seasons. There were more insect-damaged heads in both seasons in the plots sprayed on demand than in those sprayed weekly. In fall and winter, the combination of a weekly schedule with 1.5x and 2x N and K rates increased marketable yields over those of the on-demand schedule. Marketable yields at the 1.5x and 2x N and K rates were similar for plants in small or large transplant container cells, but the lx N and K rate applied to plants in small cells reduced yields. In spring, both application schedules produced similar yields, but yield increased with increasing N and K rates and large transplant container cells. Insecticide application schedule and cell size did not affect leaf nutrient concentration significantly, but increasing N and K rates resulted in higher N, P, and K leaf concentrations. Concentrations of N and K in the soil at 42 days after transplanting (DAT) were higher with increasing N and K rates. At harvest (86 DAT), only K concentrations had increased with N and K rates. Chemical name used: cyano (3-phenoxyphenyl) methyl 1-4 chloro-alpha-(1-methylethyl benzeneacetate) (fenvalerate).

Free access

Alexander A. Csizinszky

Sweet marjoram [(marjoram) Origanum majoranna], Italian parsley [(parsley) Petroselinum crispum], Summer savory [(savory) Satureja hortensis], and thyme (Thymus vulgaris) were evaluated for their yield potential during Fall–Winter–Spring (Oct.–May) 1998–99. The herbs were grown in a light sandy soil with the full-bed polyethylene mulch-micro(trickle) irrigation system. Experimental design was a split-plot replicated three times. Main plots were two N–P–K treatments: 0 N–P–K or N and K from a liquid 4–0–3.32 (N–P–K) fertilizer injected at 0.77 N and 0.64 K kg·ha–1·day–1. Sub-plots were four compost rates at 0x, 1x, 2x, and 4x (1x = 4.5 t·ha–1). Early and seasonal total yields of marjoram and savory were similar with injected N + K and 0x compost to yields with compost and with or without injected N + K fertilizer. Yields of parsley and thyme increased with increasing compost rates and were best with compost plus liquid N + K. Postharvest soil concentrations of NO3-N were lower in the parsley, than in the marjoram, savory and thyme plots. Residual concentrations of all other elements were similar with or without injected N + K or compost treatments.

Free access

A. A. Csizinszky

Italian parsley (parsley) Petroselinum crispum, summer savory (savory) Satureja hortensis, sweet marjoram (marjoram) Origanum majoranna, and thyme Thymus vulgaris, were evaluated for their yield potential in multiple harvest during the fall–winter–spring (Dec.–May 1997–98). The herbs were grown with the full-bed polyethylene mulch-micro (trickle) irrigation system. Experimental design was a split-plot arranged in three randomized complete blocks. Main plots were two N–P–K treatments: 0 N–P–K or N and K from a liquid 4N–0P–3.32K fertilizer injected at 0.77 N and 0.64 K kg/ha per day. In the subplots, compost was applied in a 4 to 8 inches wide band on the pre-bed at 0x, 1x, 2x, and 4x rates (1x = 4.5 t·ha–1). Parsley and marjoram yields in the first three harvests and thyme yields in the first two harvests were similar with 0x compost and N + K injected fertilizers to yields with 3x and 4x compost rates with no injected N + K fertilizers. For the season, yields were higher with injected N + K fertilizers with or without compost, than in the compost treated plots with no N + K fertilizers.

Free access

Carolyn J. DeMoranville and Joan R. Davenport

It has been speculated that cranberries are susceptible to chloride injury. If this is the case, it is possible that applications of high rates of 0-0-60 (KCl) fertilizer as a K source could be detrimental to cranberry productivity. Grower anecdotes of using 0-0-60 to “shut down the plants” persist. Supposedly, using 225+ kg·ha-1 of this material slows or arrests vegetative growth. In fact, growers have claimed it can overcome the production of rank vegetation that results when too much N fertilizer has been applied. Field plots were initiated to determine the suitability of KCl and to determine if high K rates could overcome the deleterious effects of excess applied N. Plots were set up in a split-block plot design with N doses [three each “normal” (28-34 kg·ha-1 N) vs. “high” (56-67 lb N/A)] in one direction and potassium/chloride treatments in the other direction (KCl or K2SO4 at 115 or 225 kg K2O; CaCl2 to give the equivalent Cl as in the high-rate KCl treatment, and a nontreated control) for a total of 36 2 × 2-m plots per each of three cultivar locations. Plots were treated and evaluated for three consecutive years. There were no significant differences in yield among the K2SO4 and KCl treatments, indicating that at rates as high as 225 kg·ha-1 K2O, 0-0-60 and 0-0-50 perform similarly. Further, treatment with CaCl2 had no significant effect on yield. In the third year, plots receiving no K treatment had significantly lower yield than those receiving either rate or form of K (single degree of freedom comparison, significant at 0.03). These results indicate that at the rates used in this study, KCl is an adequate K source. The effect of N rate was more pronounced than that of the K treatments. In years two and three, the low N rate strips had significantly greater yield compared to that in the high N rate strips. By year two, the high N strips were visually different, with rank overgrowth. There was no significant interaction of N rate and the K treatments. While there was a trend for greater difference between the 0 K and 115 kg K rates in the high N plots compared to the moderate N plots, the addition of K never entirely overcame the negative yield effects of high N rate.

Free access

James M. Dangler and Salvadore J. Locascio

Tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) were grown on polyethylene-mulched beds of an Arredondo fine sand during two seasons to evaluate the effects of trickle-applied N and/or K, percentages of trickle-applied N and K (50%, 75%, and 100%), and schedules of N and K application on fruit yield, and leaf and shoot N and K concentrations. The daily irrigation requirement, calculated at 47% of the water evaporated from a U.S. Weather Service Class A pan (Epan), was met by the application of 4.6 mm to 7.2 mm water/day. Fertilizer was injected weekly in a variable (2% to 12.5% of the total amount weekly) or constant (8.3% of the total amount weekly) schedule during the first 12 weeks of each season. Trickle-applied nutrients and trickle-applied percentage of nutrients interacted in their effects on early, midseason, and total marketable fruit yields. When N + K and N were trickle-applied, the mean early total marketable fruit yield decreased linearly from 25.3 t·ha-1 to 16.3 t·ha-1 as the trickle-applied percentage of nutrients increased from 50% to 100%; but when K was trickle-applied (100% preplant-applied N), yields were not affected by the trickle-applied percentage (mean 26.3 t·ha-1). The weekly schedule of N and K injection had no effect on fruit yield or other characteristics. Higher leaf N and K concentrations early in the season were obtained when the respective nutrient was 50% to 100% preplant-applied than when the respective nutrient was 75% to 100% trickle-applied; but late in the season, higher concentrations were obtained when the respective nutrient was trickle-applied. Higher yields, however, were associated with higher early season leaf N concentrations rather than with higher late-season leaf N or K concentrations.

Free access

Ian R. Rodriguez, Grady L. Miller and L.B. McCarty

For drainage, turfgrass is often established on sand-based soils, which are typically nutrient-deficient and require supplemental fertilization. The objective of this study was to determine the optimum N-P-K fertilizer ratio for establishing bermudagrass from sprigs in sand. `FloraDwarf' and `Tifdwarf' bermudagrasses [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. × C. transvaalensis Burt-Davy] were sprigged on a United States Golf Association (USGA) green [85 sand: 15 peat (v/v)] in Aug. 1996 at the Univ. of Florida's Envirogreen in Gainesville, Fla. `TifEagle' bermudagrass was sprigged on a USGA green [85 sand: 15 peat (v/v)] and `Tifway' bermudagrass [C. dactylon (L.) Pers.] was sprigged on native soil at Clemson Univ. in Clemson, S.C. in May 1999. Treatments consisted of fertilizer ratios of 1N-0P-0.8K, 1N-0P-1.7K, 1N-0.4P-0.8K, 1N-0.9P-0.8K, and 1N-1.3P-0.8K applied based on a N rate of 49 kg·ha-1/week for 7 weeks. Growth differences were apparent among cultivars. A 1N-0P-0.8K or 1N-0P-1.7K ratio is insufficient for optimum growth of bermudagrass during establishment, even when planted on a soil high in P. Increased coverage rate with additional P was optimized at a ratio of 1N-0.4P at all four sites. Increased coverage with P was greatest on the sand-based greens, probably due to the very low initial P levels of the soils. On two of the sand-based greens, P in excess of a 1N-0.4P ratio decreased coverage rate.