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Utah State University. Tony continued his work with computers and developed an integrated pest management system designed to help fruit growers reduce pesticide use while still providing effective pest and disease control. Tony also served as the

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In the mid-1980s, eastern filbert blight (EFB) fungus, Anisogramma anomala (Peck) E. Müller, was discovered in Oregon's main hazelnut-producing region and now is present throughout the hazelnut-producing area. Oregon State University's (OSU) Hazelnut Breeding Program responded by developing EFB-resistant cultivars, the first of which was released in 2005. The breeding program has also selected for other beneficial traits such as uniform early nut maturation, larger kernel size, and improved kernel quality. A 2008 OSU economic study on the costs of establishing and producing hazelnuts showed that the EFB-resistant cultivars enhanced economic viability of orchards, increasing cumulative cash flow during the 12-year establishment period by $12,243 per hectare. Several completely resistant cultivars have been released from the OSU Hazelnut Breeding program, all of which have ‘Gasaway’ as a resistance source, which transmits a dominant allele at a single locus that provides resistance to EFB. Additional EFB-resistant genotypes have also been identified from a diversity of origins that are being integrated into the OSU breeding program to produce new cultivars expressing multiple sources of genetic resistance. Interest in growing hazelnuts is increasing in other parts of the United States; for example, the Arbor Day Foundation began the Hazelnut Research Project in 1996 in Nebraska. A Hybrid Hazelnut Consortium was formed to join the leading hazelnut researchers in the United States. The Consortium's goal is to create a world-leading research and breeding program to develop hazelnuts as a widely adapted, high-yielding, and low-input sustainable crop that is competitive with annual crops for food, feed, or bioenergy. At Rutgers University, there has been a program of breeding and research for hazelnuts for the eastern United States since 1996. The program currently has ≈11,000 hazelnut seedlings undergoing evaluation. The Rutgers program is also looking for winter-hardy genotypes. They have been working closely with OSU to assess the response of OSU hazelnut selections that are resistant to EFB in Oregon when they are exposed to EFB isolates collected from across the eastern United States. This work has demonstrated the need for cultivars to express multiple sources of resistance and has prompted quarantine on importation of hazelnut plants into Oregon from other states where EFB strains may differ. Rutgers is also searching for new sources of resistance to EFB from seedling populations from Europe with the goal of integrating these sources into American germplasm. More effective Integrated Pest Management for EFB-susceptible hazelnut cultivars has been developed by OSU scientists. They recommend a management program that integrates scouting for and pruning infected tissue, fungicidal sprays, and the use of more resistant cultivars. Advances in hazelnut fertilizer management have included descriptions of patterns of nitrogen uptake, distribution, and use using isotopically labeled nitrogen.

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the front and back sleeve to help you along your way. Furthermore, at $14.95, this book is a great deal for the level of detail included in the 160 pages. The chapters include inset information describing everything from integrated pest management

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pest management and introduction to IPM case studies; IPM case studies (Brassicas); IPM case studies (Berry Crops); IPM case studies (Cotton); IPM case studies (Leafy Salad Crops); IPM case studies (Grain); IPM case studies (Seed Potato); IPM case

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that there is information pertaining to detection, identification, monitoring, chemical control, biological control, cultural control, host-plant resistance, and integrated pest management (IPM). The authors provide in-depth descriptions of a variety of

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. Cloyd Professor and Extension Specialist Ornamental Entomology/Integrated Pest Management Department of Entomology Kansas State University Manhattan, KS

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1992 Integrated pest management for cole crops and lettuce Statewide Integrated Pest Management Project, Div. of Agr. and Natural Resources, Publ. 3307 31 32 Zerbini, F.M. Gilbertson, R.L. 1997 Lettuce mosaic 43

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problems caused by air pollution, nematodes, diseases, insects, and wildlife. It provides information on integrated pest management, pesticide-use precautions, equipment, and application. There is new information on pest management in organic production

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involved in plant breeding and integrated pest management. There is a short section dealing with birds, bats, and moths and with their role as mixed-pollinator systems. There are ten color photos providing a view of several pollinators on different flowers

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, neonicotinoids, ketoenols, diamides, and pymetrozine ( Horowitz et al., 2020 ). Therefore, integrated pest management practices comprise an essential alternative to spray programs and have shown satisfactory results managing this pest. For example, the use of

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