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methods for weed control ( Giaccone et al., 2018 ; Masilamany et al., 2017 ; Shen and Zheng, 2017 ; Somireddy, 2011 ; Witcher and Poudel, 2020 ). Some of the most widely evaluated mulch materials have included pine ( Pinus sp.) bark, rice ( Oryza

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suppliers grow this crop in straight sphagnum moss (moss), most growers in the United States produce this orchid in media largely made of ground douglas fir [ Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco] bark. Because it is obvious that these two materials have

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; Williamson and Lyrene 2004b ). Many new southern highbush blueberry (SHB) plantings in the southeastern United States are grown in pine bark beds that are 15 to 20 cm deep and of varying widths rather than in the underlying soil ( Williamson et al., 2006

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this establishment period, plants were grown in four commercial substrates: substrate 1 (S1), consisting of bark, coarse peatmoss, and perlite (BM-7; Berger, Saint-Modeste, QC, Canada); substrate 2 (S2), consisting of sphagnum peatmoss, vermiculite, and

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( Pinus ponderosa ) bark screened to sizes from 13 to 25 mm was used as the mulch in this study, and the bark was fresh from a lumber-processing mill both years. Mulch surrounded the root balls, covering the sides and bottoms of the balls on all plants

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Peat moss and pine bark are the primary components of growth substrates in the production of container-grown herbaceous crops. However, there is concern that the availability of pine bark for horticultural usage might be limited as a result of

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North Carolina State University (NCSU) Porometer Method ( Fonteno et al. 1995 ) require specific MCs for different substrates to be tested accurately. Pine bark is generally shipped by truckload and may vary considerably in MC. Peat moss is commonly

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-flowered Phalaenopsis Blume × Taisuco Kochdian clone were imported in late May. Plants were potted in 11.4-cm round plastic pots (600-mL volume) filled with a mix consisting of three parts medium-grade ground Douglas fir [ Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco] bark

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and 32 °C ( Akinnifesi et al., 2004b ). Stem diameters of scions, stocks, and graft unions were measured using a pair of calipers. Bark thickness for both scions and stocks was also measured. Ten grafts of U. kirkiana trees, grafted by the splice

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media commonly used in Florida's greenhouse vegetable industry are perlite, pine bark, and commercial peatmoss-based mixtures. These media have adequate aeration porosity and water-holding capacity ( Burés, 1997 ; Pokorny, 1987 ; Raviv et al., 2002

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