Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 136 items for :

  • social media x
Clear All
Full access

Tara Baugher, Montserrat Fonseca Estrada, Kelly Lowery and Héctor Núñez Contreras

and improving education and engagement with Hispanic/Latino growers were not significantly different, but those with the highest ratings were use of social media in Spanish, holding some educational programs specifically for Latino farmers to increase

Full access

Joseph C. Scheerens

Increasing fruit and vegetable consumption reduces risk factors for cancer, cardiovascular disease and a number of other diet-related chronic diseases. These foodstuffs contain relatively high levels of beneficial phytochemicals (plant-derived, biologically active compounds) among which the preventative activity of antioxidants are most well-known and well-documented. Since small fruit typically contain high levels of antioxidants, increasing their incorporation in the diet is a laudable goal. Media reports of medical studies pertaining to dietary intake and national education initiatives such as the USDA's Food Guide Pyramid and the 5 A Day—for Better Health program have successfully raised public awareness of the health benefits of increased fruit and vegetable consumption, but, as of yet, may not have altered dietary habits. The factors influencing food choice are complex and interrelated. They include: sensory preference, physiological factors (pre- and postingestion), age, gender, lifestyle, behavior, personality, education, income, social attitudes about diet and health, ethnicity and tradition, religious beliefs, social pressures, marketing pressures, available product information and knowledge (labeling, media coverage, etc.) or self-identity beliefs. Some of these factors offer opportunities for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption while others present challenges. With respect to small fruit, food choice factors that tend to increase consumption include public awareness of these products as being beneficial to health and longevity and their image as highly desirable, dessert-like commodities with exquisite flavors. The main factors that deter increased small fruit consumption include their relatively high price per serving and their relative perishability which affects cost, ease of transport and availability. Strategies to capitalize on small fruits' positive attributes and overcome negative attributes with respect to food choice include the application of innovative marketing strategies at all levels and the expansion of research efforts to optimize the health benefits and sensory quality of these products.

Free access

P. Diane Relf and R. Peter Madsen

Developing the Interdisciplinary Research Team of the Office of Consumer Horticulture has proven to be very effective at Virginia Tech. Established with the support of the Director of the Agricultural Research Station and the Dean of Research, the initial team was gathered based on their diverse fields and a common “interest” in plants. This core group consisted of three horticulturists, a landscape architect, a psychologist, a sociologist, and an Extension administrator. A campus-wide promotional mailing brought several new members. Members were also invited to join based on their human-factors research activities as reported in campus media. There are currently 19 members; they have actively pursued cooperative research projects to keep costs at a minimum. Members have conducted a 100-participant campus workshop as well as the national symposium, “The Role of Horticulture in Human Well-Being and Social Development,” and are currently working on ten research projects which will help develop methods and data valuable for learning about the effects of horticulture on human life quality.

Free access

Tom Andrew Vestal and Gary E. Briers

This study enhances knowledge of and information for food systems educators and industry about multiplying their efforts—enlisting collaboration of journalists and the social institution of mass media—in educating consumers about food biotechnology. The focus of this study (diffusion of innovations of food biotechnology) may change behaviors of researchers, agricultural educators, and those in the food biotechnology industry. The researchers investigated journalists' knowledge about, attitudes toward, and perceptions of food biotechnology. Eighty-eight journalists practicing at the nation's largest newspapers and representing “beats” of business, environment, agribusiness, features, food, health/medical, and science/technology provided data for the study. A researcher-developed instrument measured journalists' knowledge, journalists' attitudes (acceptance of genetically modified organisms, acceptance of food biotech practices, effects of biotechnology, level of importance of research, faith in sources, level of importance placed on investigative reporting style, and fear of using food biotechnology), and journalists' perceptions regarding acceptance of food biotechnology as a farm practice. Major findings were journalists' knowledge was low (mean 30.2%), most journalists considered genetic modification of plants as “acceptable,” journalists had greatest faith in “university scientists” and “health professionals” as sources of biotechnology information, journalists do further investigation and interpretation of information given by sources based on their faith in the source, journalists believed that farmers would accept food biotechnology more rapidly than consumers, journalists with higher perceived scientific knowledge had greater acceptance of genetically modified organisms, journalists with more knowledge about biotechnology saw fewer obstacles to acceptance of food biotechnology; and “Writers” rather than “Editors/Managers” accepted more readily genetically modified organisms, had greater faith in sources, had less fear of using food biotechnology, and perceived a more rapid rate of acceptance of food biotechnology as a farm practice.

Full access

A.W. Fleener, C.W. Robinson, J.D. Williams and M. Kraska

. Educ. Mag. 62 4 10 11 Muschert, G.W. Frame-changing in the media coverage of a school shooting: The rise of Columbine as a national concern Soc. Sci. J. 46 1 164 170 Newman, K.S. Fox, C. Roth, W. Mehta, J. Harding, D. 2004 Rampage: The social roots of

Full access

Laura A. Warner, Anil Kumar Chaudhary and Sebastian Galindo-Gonzalez

Water availability is one of the key environmental and social issues of the present time. Places such as the southeast, southwest, and southern Great Plains of the United States are currently experiencing both long- and short-term water deficits and

Free access

Carlo Mininni, Pietro Santamaria, Hamada M. Abdelrahman, Claudio Cocozza, Teodoro Miano, Francesco Montesano and Angelo Parente

receive the European Union “eco-label,” growing media (including soil improvers) should not contain any peat materials, encouraging the use of organic matter derived from the processing and/or re-use of waste ( EU Commission, 2006 ). Numerous studies have

Full access

, Camino Real, Albion, and San Andreas. Retail Firms Market through the Internet and Social Media The 2013 Trade Flows and Marketing Practices survey asked retail-only firms how they advertise/market their products. Barton and Behe (p. 99) found that

Free access

Mindy L. Bumgarner, K. Francis Salifu and Douglass F. Jacobs

Use of overhead irrigation in container tree seedling production can be wasteful of water resources and should be re-evaluated as social and legal pressures increase to reduce water consumption ( Landis and Wilkinson, 2004 ; Oka, 1993 ). Moreover

Full access

continuing education topics, preferred delivery methods, and usage of social media. The primary reasons to volunteer were to learn more about gardening and help others in their communities. Aligning these reasons for volunteering and continuing education