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Psychol. Assess. 6 284 290 doi: 10.1037/1040-3590.6.4.284 10.1037/1040-3590.6.4.284 DeHart, G.B. Srouf, L.A. Cooper, R.G. 2004 Child development: Its nature and course 5th ed. McGraw-Hill New York, NY Fjortoft, I. 2001 The natural

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The human relationship with nature is profoundly complex ( Heynen et al., 2006 ; Jackson, 2003 ; Kahn, 2005 ; Kellert, 2004 ; Kibert, 1999 ; Miller, 2005 ) and therefore difficult to understand. However, extraordinary psychological, ecological

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Community educators, teachers, designers, and parents consider the increase in children's gardens in schools and communities an important and positive trend. Being active in children's gardens encourages positive attitudes toward nature and the

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. Univ. Illinois Press, Urbana, IL Louv, R. 2008 Last child in the woods: Saving our children from nature-deficit disorder. 2nd ed. Algonquin Books, Workman, NC Maller, C. Townsend, M. 2006 Children’s mental health and wellbeing and hands-on contact with

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,” “kid-sized,” and “kid-friendly.” Despite these slogans, no consumer studies have been published on children’s liking of mandarins in California. This study set out to characterize the sensory preferences of adult and child consumers living in the Davis

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.22 for households with two or more children and mean of 4.02 for households with one child) compared with households without children (mean of 2.98). Two-adult households were more likely to respond positively to “nature walks and hikes” (mean of 5

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simple strategies for incorporating them into our designed spaces. Nature equals specialized relationships A pattern is emerging from conservation efforts around the world; if you want to save a particular species, you have to save the specialized

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-14 School garden survey. Santa Cruz, CA. 10 Sept. 2015. < http://www.lifelab.org/2013/12/schoolgardensurvey2014 > Louv, R. 2008 Last child in the woods: Saving our children from nature-deficit disorder. Updated and expanded ed. Algonquin Books, Chapel Hill

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. Kaivola, T. 2012 Garden affordances for social learning, play, and for building nature–child relationship Urban For. Urban Green. 11 195 203 10.21273/HORTTECH.22.4.430 Langellotto, G.A. Gupta, A. 2012 Gardening increases vegetable consumption in school

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with weak abilities in terms of social skills (e.g., self-assertion, self-control, cooperation) and they tend to avoid social relationships ( Smith et al., 2005 ). The categories of intellectual disability are based on intelligence quotients (IQs

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