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). Cucurbit powdery mildew (CPM) caused by Px is a serious fungal foliar disease of cucurbit production in open fields and greenhouses. Disease outbreak brings reduction in plant growth, premature foliage loss, and reduction in yield and fruit quality

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& Shishkoff (syn. Sphaerotheca fuliginea auct. p.p.) can be a severely limiting factor in cucurbit production in open fields and greenhouses. Powdery mildew can result in reduced vigor of the seedlings and, in some instances, death of the seedlings. Powdery

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., 2010 ). In cucurbit crops, certain rootstocks can improve growth and yield at suboptimal soil temperatures ( Ahn et al., 1999 ; Zhou et al., 2007 ), reduced irrigation ( Rouphael et al., 2008 ), and salinity ( Colla et al., 2006 ; Huang et al., 2010

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) and 96% of the area planted to honeydew (6,799 ha) in 2009. They produced 84% and 94% of the yields and 78% and 93% of the value of cantaloupe ($359.1 M) and honeydew ($59.1 M) melons, respectively, in the United States ( USDA-NASS, 2010 ). Cucurbit

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The methyl bromide phase-out was completed in 2005, and its availability is currently based on critical use exemptions. For production of many vegetables, especially cucurbit crops, methyl bromide alternatives are not available, and growers continue

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identifying viable alternatives for pathogen management. A growing method for soil-borne pathogen management in U.S. cucurbit production is grafting. In most cases, regardless of crop, grafting involves the fusion of a high-yielding, susceptible scion to a

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Cucurbit viruses are a major hindrance to cucurbit production in southern Illinois, often rendering cucumber and summer squash fruit unmarketable. Specific viruses infecting cucurbits in the region need to be determined since this would enable growers to make better decisions on virus disease management. Leaf samples of various cucurbit vegetables that had symptoms of viral infection were collected from grower fields during the 1998 and 1999 growing seasons to determine the predominant cucurbit viruses present. Samples were assayed for the presence of five individual viruses: cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), papaya ringspot virus (PRSV, formerly watermelon mosaic virus-1), squash mosaic virus (SqMV), watermelon mosaic virus (WMV, formerly watermelon mosaic virus-2), and zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV). Results from the two years indicated that WMV was the most prevalent virus in southern Illinois. Cucumber mosaic virus was found both years, but only in a low percentage of samples collected each year. Two cucurbit viruses, PRSV and ZYMV, were each identified only in one sample during the 1998 growing season, and neither were found in any of the samples collected during 1999. Squash mosaic virus was not identified in any of the samples collected during 1998; however, for the 1999 growing season, SqMV was identified in 19% of the samples collected, primarily from those samples of transgenic squash that were showing symptoms of virus infection.

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( Matthews, 1993 ) and in AA at 41 to 43 °C for 48 to 72 h ( Hampton and TeKrony, 1995 ). Although various studies have been conducted in cucurbit seeds ( Pesis and Ng, 1983 ; Torres and Marcos-Filho, 2005 ), no consistent aging environment has been

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Cucurbit crops are an extremely important agricultural commodity in the United States as well as worldwide. The two most important cucurbit crops in terms of overall production in the United States are watermelon ( Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus

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standard method of production for many vegetable crops. Spunbonded polyethylene rowcover installed immediately after planting can suppress some key pest problems of cucurbits. For example, season-long suppression of bacterial wilt on MM, which is vectored

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