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Michael A. Fidanza, David L. Sanford, David M. Beyer and David J. Aurentz

production facility and the discarded material is then referred to as fresh mushroom compost ( Beyer, 2003 ; Chang and Hayes, 1978 ; Wuest, 1982 ). Before removal, however, the substrate is again pasteurized with steam heat to eliminate the potential for

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Ryan C. Costello, Dan M. Sullivan, David R. Bryla, Bernadine C. Strik and James S. Owen

of years ( Julian et al., 2012 ; Strik et al., 2017 ). Therefore, a suitable replacement for bark and sawdust is needed to maintain soil organic matter within production systems that use weed mat. Compost has many characteristics that are similar to

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Rufus L. Chaney

82 COLLOQUIUM 3 Municipal Waste Compost Production and Uses for Horticultural Crops

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Nancy E. Roe

82 COLLOQUIUM 3 Municipal Waste Compost Production and Uses for Horticultural Crops

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Ron Alexander

82 COLLOQUIUM 3 Municipal Waste Compost Production and Uses for Horticultural Crops

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Monica Ozores-Hampton

82 COLLOQUIUM 3 Municipal Waste Compost Production and Uses for Horticultural Crops

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Tina Waliczek, Amy McFarland and Megan Holmes

disposal in landfills on the environment is important, particularly in large organizations. Instead of conventionally disposing of food wastes by sending it to a landfill, composting is a more sustainable alternative that is gaining popularity. Through a

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Ashley A. Thompson and Gregory M. Peck

addition, there have been few studies describing the effects of carbon-based fertilizers, such as compost, on apple tree growth and productivity in newly planted high-density orchards in this region. Furthermore, mineral N fertilizers may lead to negative

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Van M. Bobbitt

“Yard wastes comprise 25% of the average person's garbage,” according to the King County (Washington) Solid Waste Division. In an effort to reduce the strain on landfills, municipalities are encouraging their citizens to compost yard wastes. Several communities in Washington State have organized Master Composter programs. Patterned after the successful Master Gardener program, volunteers receive intensive training in comporting. In return, they deliver this information to the public through lectures, demonstrations, brochures, and composing demonstration gardens.

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D.W. Burger, T.K. Hartz and G.W. Forister

Seed germination and crop growth characteristics were determined for Tagetes spp. L. `Lemondrop', marigold; Catharanthus roseus Don. `Little Pinkie', vinca; Petunia hybrida Vilm. `Royalty Cherry', petunia; Dendranthema×grandiflorum (Ramat.) Kitamura `White Diamond', chrysanthemum; Pittosporum tobira Ait. `Wheeleri', sweet mock orange; Photinia ×fraseri Dress., photinia and Juniperus sabina L. `Moon Glow', juniper grown in various size containers containing blends of composted green waste (CGW) and UC Mix. Seed germination, plant height, and stem and root fresh and dry mass were lowest in unamended CGW. For most plants studied, a CGW: UC Mix blend containing at least 25% UC Mix was required for adequate growth and development. Germinating seeds and young seedlings were most adversely affected by unamended CGW. As plants grew and were transplanted into larger containers (10- and 15-cm pots, 530 and 1800 mL), they were better able to grow in media with higher CGW content.