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Rootzone pH affects nutrient availability for plants. Hydroponic leafy greens are grown in nutrient solutions with pH 5.5 to 6.5. Lower pH may inhibit plant growth, whereas pathogenic oomycete growth and reproduction may be mitigated. General understanding of pH effects on nutrient availability suggests likely toxicity and deficiency of specific micronutrients. We hypothesized that if adjustments are made to the micronutrient concentrations in solution, plants will grow in lower-than-conventional pH without nutrient disorders, while oomycete disease incidence and severity may be reduced. To develop a new nutrient solution management strategy, we examined pH of 4.0, 4.5, 5.0, and 5.5 with or without micronutrient adjustments for growing two cultivars of basil plants Dolce Fresca and Nufar in a greenhouse hydroponic deep-water culture (DWC) system. Micronutrient adjustments included reduced concentrations of copper, zinc, manganese, and boron by one-half and doubled molybdenum concentration. Plants harvested 20 to 28 days after transplanting did not show significant effects of pH or the micronutrient adjustment. Phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, sulfur, boron, manganese, and zinc concentrations in leaves significantly declined, while potassium and aluminum concentrations increased with decreasing pH. However, these changes and therefore micronutrient adjustments did not affect basil plant growth significantly. ‘Nufar’ basil plants were then grown in a growth chamber DWC system at pH 4.0 or a conventional 5.5 with and without inoculation of Pythium aphanidermatum zoospores. Fourteen days after inoculation, P. aphanidermatum oospore production was confirmed only for the inoculated plants in pH 5.5 solution, where a significant reduction of plant growth was observed. The results of the present study indicate that maintaining nutrient solution pH at 4.0 can effectively suppress the severity of root rot caused by P. aphanidermatum initiated by zoospore inoculation without influencing basil growth.

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). Varying degrees of potential resistance were also identified in other Ocimum species including the citrus, spice, and holy basils with symptoms and sporulation of BDM either nonexistent or significantly less than that observed in O. basilicum

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Basil ( Ocimum spp.) is a highly diverse genus that exhibits wide inter- and intraspecific variation in morphology, genetics, and composition of essential oil ( Paton and Putievsky, 1996 ; Vieira et al., 2003 ). Sweet basil ( O. basilicum ) is the

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Sweet basil ( Ocimum basilicum L., Fam. Lamaiaceae) is the most commercially important annual culinary herb crop grown in the United States. Sweet basil is grown for culinary use for both fresh and dry consumption and as a source of essential oil

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, O. Putievsky, E. 2002 Breeding of sweet basil ( Ocimum basilicum ) resistant to fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. basilicum J. Herbs Spices Med. Plants 9 45 51 10.1300/J044v09n02_07 Fenneman, D. Sweat, M. Hochmuth, G. Hochmuth, R

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. Influence of air temperature on fresh weight gain of ( A ) sweet basil ( Ocimum basilicum ‘Nufar’), ( B ) lemon basil ‘Sweet Dani’ ( O. basilicum ), ( C ) lemon basil ‘Lime’ ( O. × citriodorum ), and ( D ) holy basil ( O. tenuiflorum ). Data were collected

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resistance from wild basil ( Ocimum americanum ) to sweet basil ( O. basilicum ) Phytopathology 108 114 123 Cohen, Y. Ben Naim, Y. Falach, L. Rubin, A.E. 2017 Epidemiology of basil downy mildew Phytopathology 107 1149 1160 Cohen, Y. Vaknin, M. Ben-Main, Y

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, Citrus , and Eugenia and, thus, chosen for this study. This study was conducted to 1) characterize the essential oils from three common species of Ocimum : sweet basil ( O. basilicum L.), holy basil ( O. americanum L.), and hairy basil ( O

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( Farahani-Kofoet et al., 2014 ; Pyne et al., 2014 ). However, these accessions are different species from O. basilicum and breeding is limited by sexual incompatibility and F 1 hybrid sterility. The commercial cultivar Mrihani [ Ocimum sp. (Horizon Seed

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development (SPAD) meter index, and nutrient concentrations for sweet basil ( Ocimum basilicum ‘Nufar’), lemon basil ( Ocimum × citriodorum ‘Lime’), and holy basil ( Ocimum tenuiflorum ‘Holy’) 3 weeks after transplanting into nutrient-film technique

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