Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 25 items for :

Clear All
Free access

Renee H. Harkins, Bernadine C. Strik and David R. Bryla

blackberry fields include hand-weeding, use of woven landscape fabric (often referred to as “weed cloth” or “weed mat”), and no or limited weeding. In the latter case, weeds are typically removed during the first few months after planting to help establish

Full access

John R. Yeo, Jerry E. Weiland, Dan M. Sullivan and David R. Bryla

are mulched with geotextile fabrics, often referred to as “weed mat.” Weed mat is more economical for weed control than sawdust, particularly in organic systems, and the use of it may result in greater plant growth and yield in blueberry ( Julian et al

Free access

Bernadine C. Strik and Amanda J. Vance

, “weed mat”, involved no preplant amendments, but included a mulch of douglas fir sawdust (≈7.5 cm deep; 300 m 3 ·ha –1 ) topped with black, woven polyethylene groundcover (“weed mat”; with a water flow rate of 6.8 L·h·m –2 and a density of 0.11 kg·m –2

Free access

Javier Fernandez-Salvador, Bernadine C. Strik, Yanyun Zhao and Chad E. Finn

fertilizers that could be fertigated were selected. Weed management during planting establishment is important for maximizing plant growth and yield ( Harkins et al., 2013 ). The use of woven polyethylene groundcovers (“weed mat”) has been shown to be an

Full access

Javier Fernandez-Salvador, Bernadine C. Strik and David R. Bryla

raised bed. The raised beds were then covered with a 6-ft-wide polypropylene woven 3.2-oz/yard 2 geotextile cloth [“weed mat” (model TerraTex Woven; Hanes Geo Components, Winston-Salem, NC)], which was centered and secured on the bed using 6-inch

Free access

Javier Fernandez-Salvador, Bernadine C. Strik and David R. Bryla

-wide strip of black, woven polyethylene groundcover (“weed mat”; water flow rate 6.8 L·h·m −2 ; density 0.11 kg·m −2 ; TenCate Protective Fabrics; OBC Northwest, Inc., Canby, OR) centered on the row. Irrigation was applied using a single lateral of drip

Free access

Anthony M. Ortiz, Brent S. Sipes, Susan C. Miyasaka and Alton S. Arakaki

cvs. Nema-gone and Golden Guardian, sorghum–sudangrass cvs. Sordan 79 and Tastemaker, and sunn hemp). Two additional treatments consisted of a weedy, unplanted plot and a control plot covered with weed mat. Plots were 3.0 × 3.7 m and each treatment was

Free access

John Strang, Carl Harper, Dana Hadad, Kay Oakley, Darrell Slone and John Snyder

Three landscape fabrics, Magic Mat®, a heavy black plastic woven fabric with a fuzzy underside; Weed Mat®, a thin black plastic sheet with small holes; and Typar®, a dark gray spun bonded material, with and without a cover of organic oak bark mulch, were evaluated for weed control and ability of strawberry plant roots to establish through the fabrics over a 4-year period. Landscape fabrics reduced weed numbers for the first 3 years in comparison with the bare ground treatment. With few exceptions. the organic mulch did not improve the weed control capability of landscape fabrics. Fruit yield for the Weed Mat and Magic Mat treatments did not differ from the bare ground treatment, but was lower for the Typar treatment when averaged over organic mulch treatments. Fruit yield was higher where the organic mulch was used when averaged over all landscape fabric treatments. Fruit size was slightly larger for the bare ground and smallest for the Typar treatments during the first harvest season, but there was no difference in fruit size by the third year of harvest. Fruit size for the organic mulched plots was slightly larger than that for the unmulched plots the second year of harvest, but there was no difference for the first or third years. The number of strawberry runner plants that rooted and plant row vigor were greater for the Weed Mat, Magic Mat and plots without the landscape fabric than for the Typar plots, particularly in the second and third season. Rooting of runner plants and plant row vigor was better with organic mulch. Landscape fabric tended to reduce extent of rooting, especially in the first season, but it was improved by the application of organic mulch.

Full access

Susan C. Miyasaka and Randall T. Hamasaki

to outstanding resource for wind power, but could be damaging to young trees. To protect young plants from wind damage, shadecloth cages were constructed as follows. Weed mat (4 ft wide) was cut with a hole in the center and each tree inserted into

Full access

David R. Bryla and Bernadine C. Strik

the drip lines under weed mat or burying them under sawdust mulch helps to secure the lines in place, prevents any damage during winter pruning, and reduces water runoff on raised beds. Since only a fraction of the soil is wetted by the drip emitters