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, midseason crop estimation and fruit thinning about 1 month after bloom to improve juice quality has been studied as a viable commercial option in ‘Concord’ vineyards ( Bates, 2006 ; Pool et al., 1993 ). Decreasing production costs. After the adoption of

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84 ORAL SESSION 26 (Abstr. 183-191) Tree Fruits: Thinning/Bloom Delay

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84 ORAL SESSION 26 (Abstr. 183-191) Tree Fruits: Thinning/Bloom Delay

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fruit size of cactus pear. In view of export markets, fruit thinning is a common practice to increase fruit size and to speed up ripening ( Inglese, 1995 ; Inglese et al., 1995 ). The reproductive bud (RB) thinning threshold has been established at six

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determinant of price, because all fruit greater than 55 mm in diameter receive the same price. To improve fruit size, hand thinning is normally done in most peach and nectarine orchards. It is widely recognized that fruit size is largely determined by crop

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Apple and peach trees normally produce significantly more fruit than the tree can carry to a marketable size crop ( Dennis, 2000 ; Wertheim, 2000 ). Hand thinning at 35 to 60 d after full bloom is the standard practice to reduce crop load and

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(PNW) where the cultural practice of hand thinning is required to attain marketable fruit size. Over the past several decades, increasing costs and decreasing availability of labor have prioritized the development of alternative crop load management

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108 ORAL SESSION 27 (Abstr. 564–571) Thinning–Fruits/Nuts

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84 ORAL SESSION 26 (Abstr. 183-191) Tree Fruits: Thinning/Bloom Delay

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