Search Results

You are looking at 11 - 20 of 149 items for :

  • "somaclonal variation" x
Clear All
Free access

Hybrid seed of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) is expensive to produce. Production of `artificial seeds' through somatic embryogenesis may be a viable alternative. Somatic embryos were induced, multiplied on a semisolid medium for 8-10 weeks, and germinated on agar-gelled medium before transplanting to soil. It was then important to determine the extent of variation among plants derived from somatic embryos. The criteria for variation among regenerants of cultivar Clinton were; plant height, fruit shape, fruit weight and number (yield/plant), days to first female flower and variation in selected isozymes. All measurements were taken on greenhouse-grown plants. Some regenerants of Clinton were also planted in the field and they flowered and, qualitatively, bore fruit as well as the zygote-derived plants. When quantitative measurements were made, variation was greater than for plants from zygotic embryos, but the visual impact was that there was little variation amongst regenerants. Regenerants grew more slowly and tended to yield higher numbers of slightly smaller fruits than plants from zygotic embryos. Average yield per plant was higher for somatic embryo-derived plants. For cultivar Corona only morphology of plant and fruit was examined. One plant was especially visually mutant and unacceptable as a commercial plant. The defects were readily identifiable in the seedling stage. Preliminary evidence suggests that `artificial seeds' of cucumbers may be a viable proposition.

Free access

Hybrid seed of cucumber (Cucumis sativus) is expensive to produce. Production of `artificial seeds' through somatic embryogenesis may be a viable alternative. Somatic embryos were induced, multiplied on a semisolid medium for 8-10 weeks, and germinated on agar-gelled medium before transplanting to soil. It was then important to determine the extent of variation among plants derived from somatic embryos. The criteria for variation among regenerants of cultivar Clinton were; plant height, fruit shape, fruit weight and number (yield/plant), days to first female flower and variation in selected isozymes. All measurements were taken on greenhouse-grown plants. Some regenerants of Clinton were also planted in the field and they flowered and, qualitatively, bore fruit as well as the zygote-derived plants. When quantitative measurements were made, variation was greater than for plants from zygotic embryos, but the visual impact was that there was little variation amongst regenerants. Regenerants grew more slowly and tended to yield higher numbers of slightly smaller fruits than plants from zygotic embryos. Average yield per plant was higher for somatic embryo-derived plants. For cultivar Corona only morphology of plant and fruit was examined. One plant was especially visually mutant and unacceptable as a commercial plant. The defects were readily identifiable in the seedling stage. Preliminary evidence suggests that `artificial seeds' of cucumbers may be a viable proposition.

Free access

Robert M. Skirvin, Kenneth D. McPheeters and Margaret Norton

Free access

Chang-Yeon Yu and John Masiunas

The objective of this study was to investigate the chromosomal and genotypic variation in regenerated plants of Solarium and Lycopersicon. Calli of Lycopersicon peruvianum genotypes PI199380, PI126345, PI251301, and LA1373, along with Solanum ptycanthum were transferred onto media consisting of MS salts with Gamborg vitamins. The shoots formed were rooted in vitro and transferred to greenhouse soil. Actively growing root tips were harvested and pretreated, fixed, hydrolyses and stained. Pollen mother cells were fixed in propionic alcohol solution and stained with aceto-carmine. The number of chromosomes were counted. The greatest variation was in Solanum ptycanthum with chromosome numbers ranging from 18 to 60 (2n=24). Progeny analysis for 12 somaclones of Solarium ptycanthum was done by selfing for two generations. Morphology, shoot height, and weight were determined in each generation. The amount of variation differed among the somaclonal lines.

Free access

Nancy A. Reichert and Brian S. Baldwin

Adventitious regeneration protocols were developed for kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.) using leaf tissue. Regenerants (R0) of three cultivars and R1 progeny from one cultivar were grown in greenhouse and field trials for assessment of various growth characteristics. R0 regenerants differed from control plants in the variety of stem colors displayed. On germination, a proportion of R1 seedlings were chlorophyll-deficient (albinos), whereas no control seedlings contained that mutation. Flowering date also was earlier in the R1 plants. The kenaf regeneration protocol also has been successful on H. syriacus (Althea, rose of Sharon), and other ornamental species are currently being evaluated. With kenaf data, the adventitious regeneration protocol potentially could be a useful tool for inducing mutations in various species of Hibiscus, including ornamentals.

Free access

Dirk R. Vuylsteke, Rony L. Swennen and Edmond A. De Langhe

Four types of morphologically distinct somaclonal variants were identified in a population of False Horn plantain (Musa spp., AAB group) plants produced by in vitro shoot-tip culture. Field performance of these variants was compared with true-to-type plantain to evaluate their horticultural traits. Significant variation was observed for plant and fruit maturity, leaf size, yield and its components, but not for leaf number, plant height, or suckering. Three of the four somaclonal variants were horticulturally inferior to the original clone from which they were derived. Yields of these variants were very poor due to inflorescence degeneration or abnormal foliage. Only the `French reversion' variant, which resembled an existing cultivar, outyielded the true-to-type clone. However, its fruit weight and size were lower. Somaclonal variation through micropropagation is of limited use in plantain improvement as it mostly mimics naturally occurring variation along with the observed poor horticultural performance of somaclonal variants.

Free access

Dae-Geun Oh and Edward C. Tigchelaar

The tangerine-virescent (tv) mutation was reported as a single gene somaclonal variant from tissue culture (Evans and Sharp 1963). A replicated field trial was conducted to characterize variation and stability in the phenotype of this tv somaclone and to compare it with the inbred parent from which it was reportedly derived.

Heritability and stability of the tv somaclonal variant was measured by comparing R3 end R4 lines of sexual progenies of the original tv variant and with its sexually derived inbred parent UC82B. Several additional variants were observed in these tv lines, including fruit shape, days to first flower, fruit weight, yield, plant type, and fertility. Eight sterile or semi-sterile plants were discovered in 6 of 39 R4 lines. Our results suggest that multiple genetic changes have occurred in the tv somaclonal variant and while the original tv mutant is stably inherited, additional genetic abnormalities occur following sexual reproduction.

Free access

Bassam Al-Safadi and Philipp W. Simon

Carrot tissue cultures, germinating seed, and dry seed were exposed to gamma radiation. Irradiation accelerated germination of carrot seed in the M1 generation at low doses (0.5 and 1 krad), whereas higher doses delayed germination. A high negative correlation was observed between dose and survival of plants after seed irradiation. Plant size and root weight were 20 % to 35% greater than control plants after seeds, but not tissue cultures, were exposed to low doses of gamma irradiation. Higher doses reduced M1 plant size by >50% in germinating seed and tissue culture treatments but less for the dry seed treatment. Seed production decreased while phenotypic variation of M1 plants increased with increasing gamma ray dosage. Root weight and total dissolved solids were highly variable in M2 families. Less variation was observed in total carotene content and none was seen in sugar type (reducing vs. nonreducing sugars). Induced variation in root color and root shape was also observed. Irradiation of germinating seed and tissue cultures yielded more M2 variation than irradiation of dry seed. Putative point mutations were not observed. Unirradiated carrot tissue cultures did not yield significant M2 somaclonal variation. Average root weight of M2 plants increased with increasing gamma ray dosage, especially for the dry seed treatment.

Free access

Choun-Sea Lin, Huey-Ling Lin, Wann-Neng Jane, Han-Wen Hsiao, Chung-Chih Lin, Fang-Yi Jheng and Wei-Chin Chang

A xylem mutant (vse) was isolated from a Bambusa edulis (Odashima) Keng plantlet following vegetative micropropagation and subculture for 7 consecutive years and induced to proliferate in medium supplemented with 0.1 mg·L-1 (0.5 μm) thidiazuron (TDZ) and to develop roots in medium supplemented with 5 mg·L-1 (26.9 μm) α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). Subsequent investigations comparing the growth habits of mutant plantlets with those of the wild type indicated that the growth of the former was retarded in a greenhouse. Several morphological abnormalities were observed in the vse mutant: it had thinner stems with fewer trichromes on the surface; the xylem vessels were smaller in diameter and contained crystal-like structures in the pith; the leaves were shorter and narrower with a sharp leaf blade angle; the roots were thinner and contained fewer xylem cells. The cation concentrations of both the mutant and wild type were similar in the in vitro analysis, except for those of iron and potassium, which were lower in mutant leaves in vivo. In 2-month-old mutant plants, iron chlorosis was observed on young leaves and a potassium deficiency was observed on older leaves. After 1 year of growth in the greenhouse, all of the wild-type plants had survived, but only 27% (16/60) of the mutant vse plants were alive.

Free access

F.A. Hammerschlag

A detached-leaf bioassay was used to evaluate peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] regenerants derived from zygotic embryo callus cultures of cultivars Sunhigh (susceptible to leaf spot) and Redhaven (moderately resistant to leaf spot) for resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. pruni [(E.F. Sm.) Dews], the causal agent of bacterial leaf spot. Regenerants obtained from calli produced on two `Sunhigh' embryos, #61 and #156, and on three `Redhaven' embryos were evaluated. Sixty-four percent of the regenerants derived from `Sunhigh' embryo #156 and 13% of the regenerants derived from `Sunhigh' embryo #61 demonstrated significantly greater spot resistance than `Sunhigh'. Regenerants with resistance greater than `Redhaven' were also obtained from both `Sunhigh' embryos. The frequency of variation in the `Sunhigh' seedling population, with respect to the response to bacterial leaf spot, was not so great as that exhibited by the regenerants derived from `Sunhigh' embryo #156. None of the `Redhaven' seedlings or any of the regenerants derived from `Redhaven' embryos were more resistant than `Redhaven'. These studies suggest that the frequency of somaclonal variation is genetically determined and that screening for somaclonal variation may be a feasible approach to obtaining leaf spot-resistant peach plants.