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James S. Owen Jr, Stuart L. Warren, Ted E. Bilderback, and Joseph P. Albano

in bark and peat-based substrates ( Handreck and Black, 2002 ; Reed, 1996 ). Empirically, Warren and Bilderback (1992) compared rates (0, 27, 54, 67, and 81 kg·m −3 ) of arcillite in a pine bark substrate and reported arcillite increased available

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J.G. Williamson and E.P. Miller

expansion of southern highbush blueberry acreage targeted for this early market is anticipated ( Strik and Yarborough, 2005 ; U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2007 ; Williamson and Lyrene 2004a ). Pine bark culture is currently the most common method for

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Nastaran Basiri Jahromi, Amy Fulcher, Forbes Walker, James Altland, Wesley Wright, and Neal Eash

-rich by-product of pyrolysis, can reduce substrate pore size by nesting between larger particles of pine bark and providing greater water-holding capacity. This reduction in substrate pore size has been demonstrated to increase the amount of available

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D. L. Airhart, N. J. Natarella, and F. A. Pokorny

Abstract

The external surfaces and internal structures of particles of milled pine bark (Pinus taeda L. and P. elliottii Engelm.) were examined with scanning electron microscopy. Numerous external openings, cracked cell walls and internal cellular connections, that might allow water penetration were observed. Periderm surfaces were without pores, and contained rough surfaces and apparently waxy substances that might resist water penetration or absorption.

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Andrea C. Landaverde, Jacob H. Shreckhise, and James E. Altland

evaluate the effect of storage duration, storage temperature, and filtration before storage on pH, EC, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), and nutrient ion concentrations of PT samples of pine bark– and peat-based substrates

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Brian E. Jackson, Robert D. Wright, Jake F. Browder, J. Roger Harris, and Alex X. Niemiera

). Of these, research and development of new substrates to replace conventionally used peatmoss and pine bark (PB) substrates have increased in recent years. In addition to developing and using new substrates, much work has focused on managing fertility

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Brian E. Jackson, Robert D. Wright, and John R. Seiler

substrates ( Aaron, 1982 ; Hoitink and Poole, 1979 ). Recently, supplies of pine bark (PB) in many areas across the southeastern states have been erratic. Reduced availability and higher costs have been driven by the reduced supply resulting from decreased

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Nastaran Basiri Jahromi, Forbes Walker, Amy Fulcher, James Altland, and Wesley C. Wright

leaching. The objective of this research was to provide a preliminary assessment of the effect of biochar amendment to a pine bark–based container substrate on water and nutrient leaching for a low and high water use woody species. Materials and Methods The

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D. F. Wagner and J. C. Neal

Abstract

Coal cinders with pine bark were evaluated as containerized plant growing medium. Rhododendron obtusum Lindl. ‘Hinodegiri’ liners were grown in several combinations of media composed of pine bark mixed with an aged and a recently combusted source of cinders. Measurements of media pH, soluble salts, NO3 –N, NH4 + –N, and 19 extractable nutrient and metallic ions were obtained. Leaf tissue samples were analyzed for 19 elements. Top dry weight, visual growth and chlorosis ratings, and root visual ratings constituted the plant growth parameters measured. Satisfactory growth was generated in pine bark amended with up to 50% cinders from either source.

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Robert D. Wright

Abstract

This study was conducted to determine the availability of N from urea applied to a pine bark container medium. Results showed that negligible amounts of urea are adsorbed to a pine bark medium compared to NH4-N. However, 71% of the urea applied was hydrolyzed to NH4 within 24 hr and 95% within 40 hr. The rapid hydrolysis would allow N from urea to be available for plant uptake or adsorption to bark soon after application, making urea an acceptable source of N for a pine bark medium.