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Carmina Gisbert, Judith M. Dumm, Jaime Prohens, Santiago Vilanova and John R. Stommel

We identified a single plant in a grow out of the eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) variety ‘Black Beauty’ bearing green fruit. ‘Black Beauty’ normally produces violet/black pigmented fruit attributed to anthocyanin accumulation. We selected the green-fruited true-breeding genotype E13GB42 from the S2 generation obtained from selfing of the S0 green-fruited color mutant. Characterization of 12 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers, eight fruit morphological attributes and fruit yield support E13GB42 arising as a spontaneous mutant of ‘Black Beauty’. With the exception of fruit calyx prickliness, E13GB42 was not significantly different from ‘Black Beauty’ for fruit morphological attributes and yield. E13GB42 exhibited an SSR marker profile identical to that of ‘Black Beauty’ but polymorphic with that of eight violet/black-fruited modern eggplant hybrids, older open-pollinated varieties and landraces. Transcript levels of key anthocyanin biosynthetic genes (Chs, Dfr, and Ans) and regulatory genes (Myb C, Myc, and Wd) were significantly lower in the green-fruited E13GB42 mutant in comparison with the black-fruited variety ‘Black Beauty’ at various stages of fruit development ranging from small post-anthesis fruit to full-size marketable fruit. Progeny obtained from selfing of the original mutant and reciprocal crosses with ‘Black Beauty’ produced violet, green, and green with violet striped color classes that together were not compatible with one or two gene inheritance models, suggesting that the mutation responsible for the E13GB42 phenotype influences multiple genetic factors that control fruit pigmentation.

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Gene E. Lester, Robert A. Saftner and D. Mark Hodges

Orange-fleshed honey dew (Cucumis melo L., Inodorus group) fruit are known for having superior food-safety, food-quality, and fruit-marketability attributes compared with orange-fleshed netted muskmelon (C. melo, Reticulatus group) and to green-fleshed honey dew (C. melo, Inodorus group) fruit. However, little is known about the production market attributes and postharvest quality comparisons of the leading orange-fleshed honey dew cultivars. Five orange-fleshed honey dew genotypes (‘Honey Gold’, ‘Orange Delight’, ‘Orange Dew’, ‘Temptation’, and a breeding line) were glasshouse-grown in both fall and spring, harvested at abscission (full-slip), and compared after storage for 3–24 days in air at 5 or 10 °C. Fruit maturity (full-slip) was between 31 and 38 days after anthesis, with maturation dependent on genotype. Days to maturity were slightly longer in the fall than in the spring. Fruit size (number of fruit per standard commercial shipping box) was between four and six fruit per box. ‘Orange Dew’ consistently had the smallest fruit (six per box), and the breeding line had the largest (four per box). ‘Orange Delight’ and ‘Orange Dew’ had the fewest whole-fruit disorders and the highest percentage of marketable fruit at harvest and following 24 days of storage at 5 or 10 °C. ‘Orange Delight’, ‘Orange Dew’, and the breeding line consistently had a more yellow peel, whereas ‘Honey Gold’ and ‘Temptation’ fruit peels had a more greenish hue. Whole-fruit firmness was 10–25 N among the cultivars and 24–35 N for the breeding line. Internal-fruit disorders, percentage marketability, and mesocarp (pulp) firmness reflected each genotype's whole-fruit attributes. ‘Orange Delight’ and ‘Orange Dew’ fruit consistently had among the highest soluble solids concentration and relative sweetness ratings, and their pulp had a more intense orange hue and lower lightness than those of the other genotypes. After 24 days of storage, ‘Orange Delight’ and ‘Orange Dew’ maintained their higher sweetness and more orange hue in both spring and fall harvests; however, depending on harvest, they were not always significantly sweeter or more orange-hued than some of the other genotypes. Our results indicate that orange-fleshed honey dew fruit are a promising new melon type suitable as a substitute for orange-fleshed netted muskmelon fruit not only for food-safety issues but also for overall marketable quality.

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D. Scott NeSmith

Station. ‘Suziblue’ is an early-season blueberry, having favorable fruit attributes, especially berry size and firmness. The new cultivar also has excellent plant vigor. Origin and Description ‘Suziblue’ was selected in 2002 at the Georgia Experiment

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D. Scott NeSmith

Agricultural Experiment Station. ‘Rebel’ is a very early-season blueberry having favorable fruit attributes, especially size and scar. The cultivar also has excellent plant vigor. Origin and Description ‘Rebel’ was selected in 2000 at the Georgia

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D. Scott NeSmith

. Fruit attributes of size, scar, color, flavor, and firmness for the new cultivar were generally very good, and cropping was among the best for this cultivar overall. Table 3. Three-year average ratings (2014–16) of some fruit and plant characteristics of

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D. Scott NeSmith

2014 to 2016. There were two replications of 15 plants each in this trial that were established in 2011. Miss Jackie™ was the latest to flower and ripen among these cultivars on average over the 3-year period. Fruit attributes of size, scar, flavor, and

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Dennis J. Gray, Zhijian T. Li, Sadanand A. Dhekney, Donald L. Hopkins and Charles A. Sims

. Flower type, yield and fruit attributes of ‘Southern Jewel’ compared with five black muscadines grown for fresh fruit consumption. z Symptoms of Pierce's disease have not been observed in ‘Southern Jewel’. Fruits are highly resistant to ripe rot

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Dennis J. Gray, Zhijian T. Li, Sadanand A. Dhekney, Donald L. Hopkins and Charles A. Sims

fresh fruit production, was statistically identical to ‘Delicious’ (data not shown). Table 1. Flower type, yield, and fruit attributes of ‘Delicious’ compared with four black-fruited muscadine cultivars grown for fresh fruit consumption. z Symptoms of

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D. Scott NeSmith

‘Southern Splendour’ could be a useful variety for certain production and/or marketing needs. Its excellent fruit attributes (flavor and firmness) are expected to make it desirable for serving quality-minded markets. Although yields can be lower for

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Patrick J. Conner

2. Flower and fruit attributes of ‘Lane’ and standard muscadine cultivars at Tifton, GA, in years 2010–12. Table 3. Change in firmness (g·mm −1 ) of ‘Lane’ and test cultivars at harvest and after cold storage (0–1 °C, 90% to 95% relative humidity). z