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John R. Clark and Paula Watson

Eleven muscadine grape (Vitis rotundifolia Michx.) cultivars were evaluated in Nov. and Dec. 1994 and Jan. and Feb. 1995 for primary bud hardiness using differential thermal analysis. Vines sampled were located at the University of Arkansas Fruit Substation, Clarkeville. Data analysis indicated a significant date × cultivar interaction for mean low temperature exotherm (LTE). Mean LTE decreased for all cultivars during the sampling period. Hardier cultivars for November and December were `Sterling' and `Summit'; for January, `Nesbitt', `Summit', `Carlos', and `Sterling'; and for February, `Sugargate', `Carlos', and `Summit'. The minimum LTE for any cultivar was – 23.8C for `Sugargate' during February.

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Jianlu Zhang and Cathy Taylor

Determining the chilling requirement for ‘Sirora’ pistachio (Pistacia vera L.) production in Australia and monitoring winter chill accumulation is desirable to allow growers to take timely mitigating action in years of insufficient chill. Based on greenhouse work, historical data analysis, and field validation, the Chilling Hour, Utah, and Dynamic Models were compared. The Dynamic Model produced the best determination for fulfillment of chilling requirement with 59 chill portions. The required number of growing degree-hours above 4.4 °C from chill fulfillment to 50% bloom was 9633. Relations among the level of fulfillment of chilling requirement, bloom delay, and yield are discussed.

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Terri Woods Starman

I thank Paul Gibson, Dept. of Plant and Soil Science, Southern Illinois Univ., for assistance in data analysis, and Barbara Garrison for technical assistance. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page

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Gary J. Keever, WJ. Foster, J.W. Olive and Mark S. West

1 Associate Professor of Horticulture. 2 Former Superintendent. Current address Ornamental Horticulture Substation, Mobile, AL 36689. 3 Superintendent. 4 Assistant Professor of Research Data Analysis. The cost of publishing this paper was

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Terri Woods Starman

I thank Arnold Saxton, Agricultural Experiment Station, Univ. of Tennessee, for assistance in data analysis. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. Under postal regulations, this paper

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Nigel C. Cook, Etienne Rabe and Gerard Jacobs

We thank Dr. J.H. Randall (Biometrician, Faculty of Agricultural Science, Univ. of Stellenbosch) for assistance with the data analysis. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page charges. Under postal

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Linda Gombert, Mark Windham and Susan Hamilton

consultation regarding experimental design, data analysis and interpretation of this study. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by page charges. Under postal regulations, this paper therefore must be hereby marked advertisement solely to

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James E. Brown, William D. Goff, James M. Dangler, Walter Hogue and Mark S. West

1 Dept. of Horticulture. 2 E.V. Smith Research Center. 3 Dept. of Research Data Analysis. Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station Journal Series no. 11-913194. We thank Brandon Early and Leslie Brasher for their assistance with this

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Marvin Pritts and James Luby

We acknowledge the assistmce of David Bedford, David Wildung, Kay Sargent, Wcs Gray, Steve Poppc, and Melvin Wiens with data collection. Marcia Eamcs-Shcavly assisted with data analysis, and James Hancock, J. Scott Cameron, and Chuhe Chen

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Terri Woods Starman

I thank the Chevron Chemical Co. for their support of this experiment; Paul Gibson, Dept. of Plant and Soil Science, Southern Illinois Univ., for assistance in data analysis; and Barbara Garrison and David Annis for technical assistance. The