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Carmen Soria, José F. Sánchez-Sevilla, María T. Ariza, Josefa Gálvez, José M. López-Aranda, Juan J. Medina, Luis Miranda, Antonio Arjona and Rafael Bartual

biofumigation in strawberry in Spain Proc. International Conference on Alternatives to Methyl Bromide. The Remaining Challenges Seville, Spain 123 125 Voth, V., D.V. Shaw, and R.S. Bringhurst. 1994. Strawberry plant called ‘Camarosa’. U

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Sokrith Sea, Cyril Rakovski and Anuradha Prakash

Management Research Fund, California Specialty Crops Council, University of California Cooperative Extension, 2011 ). Methyl bromide (MB) is a common fumigant for quarantine treatment in the United States ( Drake et al., 2003 ; Environmental Protection

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Adam F. Wimer, Steven L. Rideout and Joshua H. Freeman

pest management practices for plasticulture production of fresh market tomato in Virginia were followed ( Kuhar et al., 2008 ). At Painter, VA, in 2006, beds were fumigated with a mixture of methyl bromide and chloropicrin [98%/2% (by weight)] at a rate

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Brad Geary, Corey Ransom, Brad Brown, Dennis Atkinson and Saad Hafez

-planted onions. Although metam sodium is considered as a possible alternative to methyl bromide (a soil fumigant implicated in ozone depletion and scheduled for phase-out of commercial agriculture), it has its own limitations. Metam sodium is considered to pose a

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Stanley Freeman

). The fumigant methyl bromide effectively controls a wide spectrum of microorganisms pests and weeds. Methyl bromide treatment completely controlled anthracnose when infested mummified fruits were buried at depths of 10 and 20 cm in the field ( Freeman

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Steven A. Fennimore, Frank N. Martin, Thomas C. Miller, Janet C. Broome, Nathan Dorn and Ian Greene

properties that affect seedling growth Ann. Appl. Biol. 56 243 251 Fennimore, S.A. Haar, M.J. Ajwa, H.A. 2003 Weed control in strawberry provided by shank- and drip-applied methyl bromide alternative fumigants HortScience 38 55 61 Fennimore, S.A. Serohijos, R

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Matthew B. Bertucci, Katherine M. Jennings, David W. Monks, Jonathan R. Schultheis, Penelope Perkins-Veazie, Frank J. Louws and David L. Jordan

pathogens ( Kubota et al., 2008 ; Lee and Oda, 2003 ; Sakata et al., 2007 ). Vegetable grafting became an important pest management option following the removal of methyl bromide as a soil fumigant ( Zagheni, 2003 ). The loss of methyl bromide and the

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Sahar Dabirian, Debra Inglis and Carol A. Miles

discontinue watermelon production, and other growers have experienced yield reduction of 25% to 75% (J. Loos and M. Nelson, personal communication, 2015). Preplant soil fumigation with methyl bromide had been used for over 50 years to control V. dahliae

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John E. Beck, Michelle S. Schroeder-Moreno, Gina E. Fernandez, Julie M. Grossman and Nancy G. Creamer

.D. Ferguson, L.M. Poling, E.B. 2006 Economic evaluation of methyl bromide alternatives for the production of strawberries in the southeastern United States HortTechnology 16 118 128 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) 2015 Agricultural statistics for 2014. U

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produced only 54% and 68% of the yield obtained from the plants grown in soil fumigated with methyl bromide in 1995 and 1996, respectively. The average fruit weight from plants grown in nonfumigated soil was also reduced, compared to that of plants grown in