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C.L. Treat and W.F. Tracy

Contribution from the Dept. of Agronomy, Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison. Research supported by Wisconsin Agr. Expt. Sta., Madison, and Midwest Food Processors Association. The cost of publishing this paper was defrayed in part by the payment of page

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M.S.S. Rao, Ajmer S. Bhagsari and Ali I. Mohamed

In Asian countries and among the oriental populations in the United States, vegetable soybeans are consumed much the same way as green peas are consumed. A need exists for developing soybean cultivars adapted to the U.S. environments to take advantage of the economic potential of vegetable soybeans for both domestic and international markets. During 1997, 12 vegetable soybean genotypes of exotic origin and two local U.S. soybean cultivars were evaluated for their agronomic performance in a randomized complete block, with four replications, at the Agric. Res. Stn. FVSU, Ga. At the R6 stage (when the seeds are of full size and still immature), plants from a half-meter-row length were sampled from each plot to estimate green pod and seed yield, and determine the nutritional quality of green beans. Significant differences were observed among genotypes for the agronomic and biochemical parameters studied. The green seed yield ranged from 7.1 (cv. Ware) to 14.0 Mg·ha–1 (cv. Tanbagura). Three cultivars, Tomahamare, Mian Yan, and Tousan-122, produced green seed yields in excess of 12 Mg·ha–1. The number of green pods varied between 1518 (Tanbagura) and 3526/m2 (cv. Hutcheson). The green bean oil and protein contents, ranged from 53.1 to 105.4 and from 354.2 and 418.3 g·kg–1, respectively. Thus, the green seeds contained only 30% of oil, but 50% to 80% of protein normally found in mature soybean seed. The glucose content was between 4.1% and 7.0%, while the phytate content varied between 0.93% and 1.3%. T he green seed yield was significantly correlated with number of green pods, number of green seeds, and green pod weight. This study showed that some exotic vegetable soybean genotypes may be suitable for production in the southeastern U.S.

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A. Belaj, I. Trujillo, R. de la Rosa, L. Rallo and M.J. Giménez

1 To whom reprint requests should be addressed. Contribution from the Department of Agronomy, University of Cordoba, Cordoba, Spain. This study was supported partially by a grant provided by the International Centre for Advanced Mediterranean

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K.S. Erusha, C. Fricker, R.C. Shearman and D.H. Steinegger

1 Graduate Student, Dept. of Horticulture. 2 Plant Breeder, Pure Seed Testing, Hubbard, Ore. 3 Professor and Head, Dept. of Agronomy. 4 Professor, Dept. of Horticulture. To whom reprint requests should be addressed. Published as Paper no

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Young K. Joo, Nick E. Christians and John M. Bremner

Professor of Horticulture, to whom reprint requests should be addressed. 1 Assistant Professor of Horticulture. 3 Distinguished Professor of Agronomy. Journal Paper no. J-13942 of the Iowa Agriculture and Home Economics Experiment Station

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Charles L. Biles, Mel Holland, Mauricio Ulloa-Godinez, Dennis Clason and Joe Corgan

1 Dept. of Entomology, Plant Pathology and Weed Science. 2 Dept. of Agronomy and Horticulture. 3 Dept. of Experimental Statistics. This research was supported by the New Mexico Agriculture Experiment Station, New Mexico State Univ. We thank

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D.S. NeSmith, P.L. Raymer, M.S.S. Rao and D.C. Bridges

1 Dept. of Horticulture. 2 Dept. of Agronomy. A contribution of the Univ. of Georgia Agr. Expt. Stas., Georgia Station, Griffin. This research was supported by state and Hatch Act funds allocated to the Georgia Agr. Expt. Stas. The cost of

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James M. McKinion and Ronaldo A. Sequeira

A contribution of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture–Agricultural Research Service Crop Simulation Research Unit in cooperation with the Agronomy Dept., Mississippi State Univ., and the Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station

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Raymond Kessler and Stan P. Myers

1 Present address: Dept. of Horticulture, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011. 2 Present address: Agronomy Dept., 605 Bradfield Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853. This paper is a portion of a thesis submitted by R.K. in parital

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Andrew C. Ludwig, John F. Hubstenberger, Gregory C. Phillips and G. Morris Southward

Journal article no. 1526 of the New Mexico State Agricultural Experiment Station. We acknowledge the advice and assistance of Joe N. Corgan, Dept. of Agronomy and Horticulture, and Donald L. Lindsey, Dept. of Entomology, Plant Pathology, and