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Abstract

The relationship of soluble solids content (SSC) to sensory quality of several cultivars of muskmelon (Cucumis melo L.) grown in Maryland or California was studied during 3 growing seasons (1970-1972). SSC above 8% was not always associated with high sweetness, flavor, or acceptability. SSC and external color were not highly correlated. Until the relation between SSC and sensory quality has been more thoroughly studied for today’s cultivars, sensory tests should be an integral part of all research involving quality of cantaloupes.

Open Access

An instrument based on near infrared (NIR) reflectance techniques is described which is capable of determining nondestructively the percent soluble solids in whole honeydew, cantaloupe and watermelon samples. It utilizes a tilting interference filter technology for wavelength scanning and a silicon detector/amplifier for the detection of radiation which has penetrated through inner melon flesh. The standard error of prediction is of the order of 1.2 percent soluble solids for honeydew melons when compared with a standard refractometer analysis.

Free access

Monosporascus root rot/vine decline (MRR/VD), caused by Monosporascus cannonballus, is a serious disease of the major melon production areas of Texas, California, and Arizona. We have previously identified differing levels of tolerance in melon germplasm based on vine disease symptoms. This study was conducted to evaluate the yield response of commercial and experimental cantaloupe and honeydew hybrids subjected to MRR/VD. Thirty-nine and six cantaloupe and honeydew hybrids, respectively, were transplanted into a field highly infested with M. cannonballus in March 1995 in a randomized, complete block with 4 replications. The field was highly infested with Monosporascus cannonballus. `Caravelle' (very susceptible) and `Deltex' (tolerant) were included as control entries. Fruit were harvested at maturity and sized. Any fruit that did not mature completely due to vine death were counted as culls (unmarketable). Marketable yield of the cantaloupe entries ranged from 26.74% to 67.35%. The most tolerant hybrids were `SR103654', `Don Carlos', `Explorer', and `Ovation'. Marketable yield of the honeydews ranged from 8.43% to 41.46%, with `Morning Ice' and `Creme de Menthe' showing the most tolerance. The best performing hybrids were evaluated again the Fall 1995 and Spring 1996 seasons. In general, genotypes which matured later, and had a more dispersed fruit set, were more tolerant to MRR/VD. This supports previous data showing that high physiological stress (heavy, concentrated fruit load) leads to more severe and rapid vine collapse.

Free access

Abstract

Foam was applied for frost protection to January planted cantaloupes (Cucumis melo L.) in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Two planting configurations consisting of shallow trenches and conventional beds were compared to evaluate volume of foam required and durability. The trench planting technique increased the foam’s durability and reduced the volume approximately three-fourths. The cost of foam application to a low profile crop in the shallow trenches was approximately $74.00 per hectare. Leaf temperature in the foamed trenches was up to 12°C warmer than nonfoamed conventional beds.

Open Access

This work was conducted for evaluate the influence of clear and black polyethylene mulches, used alone or combined with floating rowcover (FRC) and plastic perforated microtunnels, on insect populations, growth and yield of muskmelon. Treatments evaluated were 1) clear plastic + FRC, 2) polyethylene perforated microtunnel, 3) clear plastic + polyethylene not perforated microtunnel, 4) black plastic + FRC, 5) clear plastic, 6) black polyethylene, 7) clear plastic + oil, and 8) bare soil. Aphids and sweetpotato whitefly adults and nymphs were completely excluded by floating rowcovers while the plots covered. The export and national quality fruit yield was major in the mulched beds in relation to control. Clear polyethylene mulch + FRC increased number of fruit and export marketable fruit of cantaloupe (45.2% and 44.8%) with respect to black plastic + FRC, respectively. It is proposed that, under tropical conditions and under high insect stress, mulches combined with floating rowcovers should be selected for their effects on insects in addition to their effects on melon yield. Polyethylene microtunnels were found not economical for cantaloupe production in western Mexico.

Free access

Abstract

A market-based farming systems research approach was used to analyze the vegetable production system for direct-to-consumer retail and wholesale marketing at the Dallas Farmers’ Market. The majority of farms produced 3–10 different vegetables for a harvest and marketing season of 4 months or more per year, irrespective of their size of operation or status as a full or part-time farmer. Watermelon, cantaloupe, sweet potato, squash, tomato, and southern pea were most commonly produced. Extensive use of leased land supported the production system by allowing land rotation or specific soil type selection. From this survey, a profile of the typical production unit was developed for use in research and extension.

Open Access

Listeriosis, a fatal food and environment borne disease of public health and veterinary importance, caused by Listeria spp. has not been explored in Pakistan. One hundred and fifty samples of fresh fruits and vegetables collected over a period of 12 months from various localities of Karachi city were screened according to the standard protocols. Suspected isolates were subjected to conventional methods for identification which included morphological, cultural, biochemical and serological tests. Out of 30 samples each of papaya, water melon and cantaloupe, and 15 each of cucumber, tomato, radish and carrot, Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from two samples of papaya and tomato each and one sample of water melon and cucumber each. It is inferred that fruits and vegetables, if not handled hygienically and served fresh, may be responsible for the transmission of listeriosis.

Free access
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This article examines the nutritional quality and human health benefits of melons, specifically, muskmelon or cantaloupe (Cucumis melo L. var. reticulatus Naud.) and honeydew melon (Cucumis melo L. var. inodorus Naud.) types. Melons are naturally low in fat and sodium, have no cholesterol, and provide many essential nutrients such as potassium, in addition to being a rich source of beta-carotene and vitamin C. Although melons are an excellent source of some nutrients, they are low in others, like vitamin E, folic acid, iron, and calcium. Since the U.S. diet is already high in fat and protein content, melons should be included in everyone's diet, along with five to eight servings per day of a variety of other fruit and vegetables, to ensure adequate nutrition, promote individual health, and reduce one's risk of cancer and certain other chronic diseases.

Full access

Abstract

Plastics in agriculture and horticulture, which had its origins nearly 4 decades ago, have grown to over a 300 million lb. industry in the United States. The inexpensive plastics excited not only researchers but farmers seeking a cheaper method of producing and preserving food and fiber. E. M. Emmert (1), of the University of Kentucky, the father of plastics in the U. S., developed many principles of plastic technology with his research on greenhouses, mulches and row covers. Early row cover experiments on cantaloupe production by C. A. Shadbolt and O. D. McCoy (11, 12), and by B. J. Hall (2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7) on cucumbers, tomatoes, and peppers, established the practical and commercial uses of the row covers for these crops. More sophisticated row covers, where heat, was used to grow early crops in the more northern latitudes, were reported in 1964 and 1965 by Merle H. Jensen and Raymond Sheldrake (9, 10).

Open Access

Abstract

Seed lots of several vegetables, including garden beans, cabbage, cantaloupe, cucumber, lettuce, okra, onion, garden peas, pepper, spinach, and tomato, and two seed lots of Kentucky bluegrass were exposed to 40-MHz radiofrequency (RF) electric fields and tested to determine the influence of the electrical treatment on germination performance. Germination was significantly increased by RF treatment through reduction of hard-seed content in beans, okra, and peas. Acceleration of germination was evident in seed lots of bluegrass, tomato, and spinach. It was particularly marked and consistent with spinach. Acceleration of spinach emergence was also noted in soil tests. The influences of seed moisture content, seed size, and characteristics of the RF electric field were also considered. Improved responses are attributed to thermal stresses developed in seed during RF treatment, but further research is recommended to explain the responsible mechanisms.

Open Access