Search Results

You are looking at 131 - 140 of 1,286 items for :

Clear All
Free access

Mark E. Herrington, Craig K. Chandler, Jennifer A. Moisander and Claire E. Reid

There is a need in Queensland winter strawberry ( Fragaria × ananassa Duch.) production areas for a highly flavored, early-ripening cultivar to replace or be an alternative to ‘Kabarla’ ( Herrington, 1995 ). ‘Kabarla’ has benefited the

Full access

Maite A. Chauvin, Matthew Whiting and Carolyn F. Ross

.e., perceived quality) and price. Important sweet cherry quality traits include fruit size, fruit color, firmness, and sweetness ( Sloulin, 1990 ). Consumer acceptance of sweet cherries appears to be most related to sweetness, flavor intensity, and skin color

Free access

W.R. Miller and R.E. McDonald

Solo-type papaya (Carica papaya L.) fruit at the mature green (MG) or one-quarter yellow (QY) stage of maturity were imported through the Port of Miami, Fla., and either irradiated (0.675 kGy) or not irradiated. Fruit condition and quality attributes were determined after ripening to the edible ripe stage at 25 °C before and after storage for 7 days at 10, 12, or 15 °C. The incidence and severity of peel scald was increased by irradiation regardless of storage and ripening regime; however, the degree of severity was dependent on fruit maturity at irradiation. Irradiated QY fruit tended to have the most serious incidence and severity of scald. Mature green fruit ripened at 25 °C without storage had the lowest incidence of fruit with hard areas in the pulp (“lumpy” fruit). The QY fruit generally were second only to irradiated MG fruit stored at 10 °C in incidence of lumpiness. Anthracnose sp. decay and stem-end-rots affected 53% of all fruit. The least decay occurred on fruit ripened at 25 °C without storage, regardless of fruit maturity, and the most decay occurred on QY fruit with or without irradiation. Fruit ripened at 25 °C without storage had more palatable pulp (5.5 N) at the edible ripe stage than did fruit held in storage and then ripened. The effect of fruit maturity or irradiation dose on fruit firmness, however, was dependent on the storage temperature. Mature green fruit ripened at 25 °C lost less weight than did those stored at cold temperatures prior to ripening. We recommend that importers obtain fruit with only a slight break in ground color, and distribute them as rapidly as possible, while maintaining transit/storage temperatures at or above 15 °C with or without exposure to irradiation.

Free access

Jun Song, Rujida Leepipattanawit, Weimin Deng and Randolph M. Beaudry

Hexanal vapor inhibited hyphae growth of Penicillium expansum and Botrytis cinerea on potato dextrose agar (PDA) and on apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) slices. After 48 hours exposure to 4.1 μmol·L-1 (100 ppm) hexanal, the hyphae growth of both fungi was about 50% that of untreated controls. At a concentration of 10.3 μmol·L-1 (250 ppm), neither fungus grew during the treatment period, however, some growth of both fungi occurred 120 hours after treatment. At concentrations of hexanal vapor of 18.6 μmol·L-1 (450 ppm) or more, the growth of both fungi ceased and the organisms were apparently killed, neither showing regrowth when moved to air. When fungi were allowed to germinate and grow for 48 hours in hexanal-free air, a subsequent 48-hour exposure to 10.3 μmol·L-1 hexanal slowed colony growth relative to controls for several days and a 48-hour exposure to 18.6 μmol·L-1 stopped growth completely. Concentrations of hexanal that inhibited fungal growth on PDA also retarded decay lesion development on `Golden Delicious' and on `Jonagold' apple slices. Hexanal was actively converted to aroma volatiles in `Jonagold' and `Golden Delicious' apple slices, with hexanol and hexylacetate production strongly enhanced after 20 to 30 hours treatment. A small amount of butylhexanoate and hexylhexanoate production was also noted. Within 16 hours after treatment, no hexanal could be detected emanating from treated fruit. Since hexanal was metabolized to aroma-related volatiles by the fruit slices, the possibility of hexanal being an essentially residue-less antifungal agent seems likely. The possibility of developing a system for treating apple slices with hexanal in modified-atmosphere packages was also examined. The permeability of low-density polyethylene (LDPE) film to hexanal and hexylacetate was, respectively, about 500- and 1000-fold higher than LDPE permeability to O2. The permeability of both compounds increased exponentially with temperature, with hexanal permeability increased 6-fold while hexylacetate increased only 2.5-fold between 0 and 30 °C.

Free access

Michele Warmund, Misha Kwasniewski, Janelle Elmore, Andrew Thomas and Koushik Adhikari

well as other odors were correlated with elderberry flavor intensity. The characteristic elderberry aroma was attributed to nonanal, dihydroedulan, and β-damascenone. Fruity aromas were associated with esters of lower carboxylic acids and alcohols

Free access

John C. Beaulieu, Maureen A. Tully, Rebecca E. Stein-Chisholm and Javier M. Obando-Ulloa

analyzed. Similar to an approach where the literature dictated the probable, consensus mandarin compounds of flavor/aroma importance ( Tietel et al., 2011 ), integrated ion abundance data for 19 compounds were normalized on the internal standard, per

Full access

Tyler Simons, Hanne Sivertsen and Jean-Xavier Guinard

-point hedonic scale ( Peryam and Pilgrim, 1957 ) for appearance, overall liking, flavor, and texture, as well as the adequacy of sweetness, sourness, firmness, and juiciness on a 5-point JAR scale ( Rothman and Parker, 2009 ). Children consumers rated

Full access

Tyler Simons, Hanne Sivertsen and Jean-Xavier Guinard

flavor, the market for mandarins is growing. There was a 10% increase in production volume since 2015 [ National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), 2017 ]. Numerous sensory evaluation studies have been conducted on mandarins, mainly through the use

Open access

Rie Sadohara, James D. Kelly and Karen A. Cichy

are extensively studied for breeding this market class ( Kato, 2000 ; Komiyama and Kato, 2004 ; Komiyama, 2013 ). Important bean paste qualities include paste yield, whiteness, stickiness, smoothness, and flavor, described in detail by Sadohara

Open access

Chengyan Yue, Zata Vickers, Jingjing Wang, Neil O. Anderson, Lauren Wisdorf, Jenna Brady, Michele Schermann, Nicholas Phelps and Paul Venturelli

consumer acceptability of the aquaponic produce based on consumers’ evaluation of intrinsic attributes (for instance, visual appearance, color, flavor, taste). To better understand consumers’ food selection behaviors for various cultivars in different