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Abstract

Respiration is of primary importance to the plant since it liberates energy to do chemical work in synthesizing energy-rich materials involved in growth. Although the respiratory rate of many plant tissues and organs have been studied (1), no data on respiratory rate of blueberry leaves was found in a search of the literature. It is felt that data on the respiratory rate of highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) would be of value since it will provide basic information for comparison with other genera.

Open Access

Abstract

Budbreak of ‘Woodard’ and ‘Bluegem’ rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium ashei Reade) occurred sooner than ‘Tifblue’ following chilling at constant 10 and 15°C and a diurnal regime of 8 hours at 15°/16 hours at 7°. Results indicate a narrower range of effective chilling temperatures for ‘Tifblue’. The temperature effect was more pronounced for ‘Woodard’ rooted cuttings than budsticks and was more significant for floral than vegetative budbreak. Floral budbreak of rooted cuttings subjected to 14 days at 30° in the middle of the chilling period was faster than at continuous chilling treatments. The number of days required for budbreak was significantly reduced as chilling hours increased.

Open Access
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Abstract

Eleven cultivars of Vaccinium ashei Reade in a 10-year-old planting were compared for number of flowers per inflorescence and for percentage of the flowers that set fruit on bagged and open-pollinated branches. Mean flower number per cluster ranged from 7.6 for ‘Bluegem’ to 5.3 for Florida-M. Mean percentage of fruit set on open-pollinated branches ranged from 75% for ‘Southland’ to 36% for ‘Tifblue’. On branches bagged to exclude bees, the range was from 21% for ‘Beckyblue’ to 3% for Tifblue.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Tifblue’ rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium ashei Reade) yields were greatest when expressed as kg of fruit per bush; however, ‘Woodard’ outyielded ‘Tifblue’ and ‘Bluegem’ per m3 of canopy volume. ‘Tifblue’ was subjected to the greatest daytime water stress due to its large canopy volume and limited feeder root density. Consequently, changes in feeder root density had a pronounced effect on yields in ‘Tifblue’. Yield was also affected to a lesser extent by feeder root density in ‘Bluegem’ but was independent of this factor in ‘Woodard’.

Open Access

exceptions, are exclusively hand harvested if destined for fresh market ( Strik and Yarborough, 2005 ). In southern Georgia, southern highbush blueberry cultivars ripen in late April and early May. Rabbiteye blueberries (≈12,000 acres), in contrast, are often

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hybridization reached its height during the development of “southern” highbush blueberry cultivars, which began in 1948 at the University of Florida ( Sharpe, 1953 ). Southern highbush blueberries (SHB) are low-chill (less than 600 h below 7 °C) interspecific

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effect of fertilizer rate and composition on growth and yield of two SHB blueberry cultivars grown in a containerized pine bark production system. Materials and Methods One-year-old ‘Misty’ and ‘Star’ SHB nursery plants were obtained from a north

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. Table 1. Mummy blight estimates, ranks, and raw percentages compared with blueberry cultivar standards (bold) listed in order of increasing susceptibility. Fruit infection screening materials. Six cultivars were selected as standards

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programs have developed blueberry cultivars that grow in a wider array of climates, allowing production to flourish in South America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. Global highbush blueberry production passed the one billion pound mark in 2012 and continues

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% crop loss on highly susceptible blueberry cultivars ( Marshall et al., 2006 ). For many years, researchers have studied rain-induced splitting in sweet cherries, tomatoes, and grapes. Susceptibility to splitting in cherries appears to be related to

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