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Thirty-six Hibiscus L. species were grown for 20 weeks under three lighting treatments at 15, 20, or 25 ± 1.5 °C air temperature to identify flowering requirements for each species. In addition, species were subjectively evaluated to identify those species with potential ornamental significance based on flower characteristics and plant form. Lighting treatments were 9 hour ambient light (St. Paul, Minn., November to May, 45 °N), ambient light plus a night interruption using incandescent lamps (2 μmol·m-2·s-1; 2200 to 0200 hr), or ambient light plus 24-hour supplemental lighting from high-pressure sodium lamps (100 μmol·m-2·s-1). Five day-neutral, six obligate short-day, six facultative short-day, three obligate long-day, and one facultative long-day species were identified. Fifteen species did not flower. Temperature and lighting treatments interacted to affect leaf number below the first flower and/or flower diameter on some species. Hibiscus acetosella Welw. ex Hiern, H. cisplatinus St.-Hil., H. radiatus Cav., and H. trionum L. were selected as potential new commercially significant ornamental species.

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1 Research associate. 2 Current address: Dept. of Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853. 3 Professor. 4 Research technician. Use of trade names does not imply endorsement of the products named nor criticism

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1 Graduate student. 2 Associate professor of ornamental horticulture. 3 Professor emeritus of floriculture. Use of trade names does not imply endorsement of the products named nor criticism of similar ones not named. From a thesis submitted by M

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1 Current address: Department of Biology, Carleton College, Northfield, MN 55057. 2 Department of Biological Sciences. Technical contribution 4750 of the South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station. The Ornamental Enhancement Research Program of

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1 Dept. of Ornamental Horticulture, Field Crop Institute, Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, POB 6 Bet Dagan 50250, Israel. Contribution from the Agricultural Research Organization, The Volcani Center, Bet Dagan, Israel. No

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1 Department of Plant Pathology and Physiology. Support for this research was provided by the Ornamental Enhancement Program of the South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station. South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station technical contribution

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1 Former graduate student. Current address: Univ. of Tennessee, Ornamental Horticulture and Landscape Design Dept., Knoxville, TN 37901-1071. 2 Professor of horticulture. We acknowledge the financial support of the American Floral Endowment. The

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1 Associate professor. 2 Professor. Technical contribution no. 4062 of the South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station. We are grateful to Yoder Brothers and South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station Ornamental Horticulture Research

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Technical contribution no. 3549 of the South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station. We a grateful to Yoder Brothers for donating plantmaterial and for financial support through the South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station Ornamental

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Micropropagated plantlets of Gerbera jamesonii H. Bolus ex Hook. F. `Terra Mix', Nephrolepis exaltata (L.) Schott `Florida Ruffles', and Syngonium podophyllum Schott `White Butterfly' were inoculated with two vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi, Glomus intraradices Schenck and Smith and G. vesiculiferum Gerderman and Trappe. They were potted in three peat-based media to determine the effects of mycorrhizal peat substrate on acclimatization and subsequent growth of micropropagated plantlets under greenhouse conditions. Symbiosis was established between the three ornamental species and VAM fungi within 4 to 8 weeks of culture in the greenhouse, but not during acclimatization. Mortality of Gerbera and Nephrolepis mycorrhizal plantlets was reduced at week 8 compared to the noninoculated control. A peat-based substrate low in P and with good aeration improved VAM fungi spread and efficiency. Mycorrhizal substrates had a long-term benefit of increasing leaf and root dry weight of Gerbera and Nephrolepis. Mycorrhizal Gerbera plants flowered significantly faster than non-mycorrhizal plants.

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