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Matthew Chappell, Sue K. Dove, Marc W. van Iersel, Paul A. Thomas and John Ruter

-based agricultural irrigation withdrawals, including specialty crop intensive areas such as the Chesapeake Bay watershed ( Lea-Cox and Ross, 2001 ) and Florida ( Beeson and Brooks, 2008 ). Further restrictions are predicted by researchers and commercial nursery

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James A. Gagliardi and Mark H. Brand

nurseries for use as ornamentals ( Bossard et al., 2000 ). Similarly, Randall and Marinelli (1996) describe 80 plants that are considered invasive in a variety of regions throughout the United States, all of which are currently or were previously used as

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Dustin P. Meador, Paul R. Fisher, Philip F. Harmon, Natalia A. Peres, Max Teplitski and Charles L. Guy

), 26 species of Pythium , 10 viruses, waterborne plant pathogens, and other microorganisms in irrigation water samples collected from nursery and greenhouse operations. Sanitation technologies are incorporated into horticulture irrigation systems to

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Smit le Roux and Graham H. Barry

required to retard shoot growth in citrus nursery trees. This information could then be used in field studies to test the effects of gibberellin-biosynthesis inhibitors on rind color enhancement of citrus fruit. Materials and methods Plant material and site

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Diane Feliciano Cayanan, Youbin Zheng, Ping Zhang, Tom Graham, Mike Dixon, Calvin Chong and Jennifer Llewellyn

Water-use permits, competition for water resources, and economics have stimulated the adoption of recycling irrigation water in the greenhouse and nursery industries ( Ehret et al., 2001 ; Hong et al., 2003 ; Newman, 2004 ; Skimina, 1992

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Hannah M. Mathers, Luke T. Case and Thomas H. Yeager

As limitations on water used by container nurseries become commonplace, nurseries will have to improve irrigation management. Several ways to conserve water and improve on the management of irrigation water applied to container plants are discussed in this review. They include 1) uniform application, 2) proper scheduling of irrigation water, 3) substrate amendments that retain water, 4) reducing heat load or evaporative loss from containers, and 5) recycling runoff water.

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Catherine A. Neal

are harvested during the dormant season and held for sale in the nursery yard. Shoot growth increases of up to 20% and root mass increases of up to 50% have been reported for woody plants grown in PiP compared with traditional container production

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Rebecca M. Koepke-Hill, Gregory R. Armel, William E. Klingeman, Mark A. Halcomb, Jose J. Vargas and Phillip C. Flanagan

that a 10-cm shoot of mugwort could create 23 m of rhizomes in 4 months, thereby, further explaining the aggressive invasive nature of this species. The invasive potential of mugwort is often favored by conditions created in nursery environments

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Tyler C. Hoskins, James S. Owen Jr. and Alex X. Niemiera

recommendations for fertilizer and irrigation management in container nurseries. Materials and Methods On 21 June 2013, pine bark:sand (9:1, by volume; Carolina Bark Products LLC, Seaboard, NC) substrate was amended with 1.8 kg·m −3 (3 lb/yd 3 ) crushed dolomitic

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Amy N. Wright, James A. Robbins and Mengmeng Gu

The nursery industry is a key segment of U.S. agriculture with an estimated wholesale value of almost $13 billion in 2006 ( Jerardo, 2007 ). In 2006, the 17 largest nursery-producing states in terms of gross sales accounted for 471,106 acres of