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Temperature-response curves for photosynthesis and respiration are useful in predicting the ability of plants to perform under different environmental conditions. Whole crop CO2 exchange rates of three magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora L.) cultivars (`MGTIG', `Little Gem', and `Claudia Wannamaker') were measured over a 25 °C temperature range. Plants were exposed to cool temperatures (13 °C day, 3 °C night) temperatures before the measurements. Net photosynthesis (Pnet) of all three cultivars increased from 3 to 15 °C and decreased again at higher temperatures. `MGTIG' had the highest and `Little Gem' the lowest Pnet, irrespective of temperature. The Q10 (relative increase in the rate of a process with a 10 °C increase in temperature) for Pnet of all three cultivars decreased over the entire temperature range. `MGTIG' had the lowest Q10 at low temperatures (1.4 at 8 °C), while `Little Gem' had the lowest Q10 for Pnet at temperatures >17 °C and a negative Q10 > 23 °C. This indicates a rapid decline in Pnet of `Little Gem' at high temperatures. The decrease in Pnet of all three cultivars at temperatures >15 °C was caused mainly by an exponential increase in dark respiration (Rdark) with increasing temperature. `Little Gem' had a lower Rdark (per unit fresh mass) than `MGTIG' or `Claudia Wannamaker', but all three cultivars had a similar Q10 (2.46). Gross photosynthesis (Pgross) was less sensitive to temperature than Pnet and Rdark. The optimal temperature for Pgross of `MGTIG' was lower (19 °C) than those of `Little Gem' (21 °C) and `Claudia Wannamaker' (22 °C). The Q10 for Pgross decreased with increasing temperature, and was lower for `MGTIG' than for `Little Gem' and `Claudia Wannamaker'. All three cultivars had the same optimal temperature (11 °C) for net assimilation rate (NAR), and NAR was not very sensitive to temperature changes from 3 to 17 °C. This indicates that the plants were well-adapted to their environmental conditions. The results suggest that respiration rate may limit magnolia growth when temperatures get high in winter time.

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Fifty-six field plantings of `Baccus', `Citation', `Packman', and `Southern Comet' broccoli were made in Charleston, S.C., at 2-week intervals from February to November from 1990 to 1992. The objective was to determine broccoli's response to growing season mean (GSM) temperatures for several important market quality characteristics, such as head shape, color, density, leafiness, and bead size. Regression analysis determined whether quality was more affected by GSM minimum (min) or maximum (max) temperature for each head quality characteristic. Head leafiness and density of `Baccus' were insensitive to GSM min (7.0 to 23.5 °C) and GSM max (17.5 to 32.5 °C) temperatures experienced during these years. `Baccus' head color was unacceptable at <20.3 °C GSM max and head shape was unacceptable at <19.8 and >26.8 °C GSM max. `Citation' head color and leafiness were unacceptable at >20.5 and >20.2 °C GSM max, respectively. Head density of `Citation' was unacceptable at <19.2 and >28.9 °C GSM max and head shape was unacceptable at <18.4 and >25.7 °C GSM max. Quality of `Packman' was unacceptable for head color at <21.0 and >27.3 °C GSM max, head leafiness at >32.0 °C GSM max, head density at <8.4 and >18.0 °C GSM min, and head shape at >22.0 °C GSM max. `Southern Comet' head quality was unacceptable for head color at <9.2 and >16.5 °C GSM min, head leafiness at >32.0 °C GSM max, head density at <8.9 and >16.2 °C GSM min, and head shape at <21.0 and >25.3 °C GSM max. GSM min or max temperatures did not affect bead size of any cultivar during any planting time studied.

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application of GABA has been found to enhance plant tolerance to abiotic stresses, such as chilling tolerance in peach fruit [ Amygdalus persica ( Shang et al., 2011 )], heat tolerance in rice seedlings [ Oryza sativa ( Nayyar et al., 2014 )], and drought

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chrysanthemum cultivars with better heat tolerance to fit in summer or warmer-sites production requirements. For conventional chrysanthemum cultivars, the critical photoperiod is 12 h or less for reproductive growth and 14 h or more for best vegetative growth

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the superoxide radical to H 2 O 2 ; peroxidase (POD); and catalase (CAT) that break down H 2 O 2 to water ( Smirnoff, 1993 ). Superior heat tolerance in warm-season species has been attributed to more efficient C 4 photosynthesis metabolism relative

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 al. 2017 , 2021 ). Some of the identified heat-tolerant accessions have less tipburn, bolting, and other physiological damage when cultivated in harmful conditions ( Lafta et al. 2017 , 2021 ). Identifying additional heat tolerance in all types of lettuce

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-tolerant ( Swift, 2008 )], Edkawi LA2711 [unknown heat tolerance, salt-tolerant], and LA1310 [cherry tomato]} were compared. Seed stocks were obtained from the C.M. Rick Tomato Genetics Resource Center at the University of California, Davis. Seeds were propagated

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enzyme mediated integration (REMI) mutant, which has a non-pathogenic lifestyle in tomato ( Redman et al., 1999 ). C. protuberata isolate Cp4666D was isolated from plants in geothermal soils and confers heat tolerance ( Redman et al., 2002 ) and CpVF is

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roles in heat tolerance. In creeping bentgrass, cultivar differences in heat tolerance were shown to be associated with variations in antioxidant enzyme activities ( Liu and Huang, 2000 ). Park et al. (1997) showed that after heat shock (and expression

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Net CO2 assimilation (A), evapotranspiration (ET), and stomatal conductance (g s) were determined in two experiments for 14 and 18 raspberry (Rubus sp.) genotypes, respectively, grown in 4-L containers and exposed to 35 °C daytime temperatures 2 weeks and 4 weeks after placement in growth chambers. Measurements were taken on two successive leaves on the same primocane between the third and seventh node (≈75% to 85% of full leaf expansion). In Expt. 1, selections from Louisiana exhibited higher A (3.10-5.73 μmol·m-2·s-1) than those from Oregon (0.50-2.65 μmol·m-2·s-1). In Expt. 2, the genotype × time interactions were nonsignificant, and time of measurement did not affect A or ET (P ≤ 0.05). Assimilation ranged from 2.08 to 6.84 μmol·m-2·s-1 and varied greatly among genotypes, indicating that diverse A levels exist at high temperatures in raspberry germplasm. NC 296, a selection of R. coreanus Miq. from China, and `Dormanred', a southern-adapted raspberry cultivar with R. parvifolius Hemsl. as a parent, had the highest A rates. Evapotranspiration and g s did not differ among genotypes. Average g s for all genotypes declined from 234 mmol·m-2·s-1 in week 2 to 157 mmol·m-2·s-1 in week 4. Our findings, coupled with plant performance under hot conditions, can be used to identify potential parental raspberry germplasm for breeding southern-adapted cultivars.

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