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Abstract

The salt tolerance of 3 muskmelon cultivars (Cucumis melo L. cv. Top Mark, PMR 45, and Hale's Best) was determined in plots artificially salinized with NaCl and CaCl2. Marketable yield, total dry weight, vine dry weight, and total fruit weight of all cultivars decreased with increasing salinity. ‘Top Mark’, the highest yielding cultivar at low salinity, yielded least at high salinity. ‘PMR 45’ was the least affected with increasing salinity. Na and Cl in the leaves and fruit and % soluble solids in the fruit all increased with increasing salinity levels.

Open Access

One hundred and thirteen olive (Olea europaea L.) accessions were characterized using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. Forty-five polymorphic RAPD markers were obtained enabling us to distinguish 102 different RAPD profiles. The approximate estimation of the probability of obtaining the same RAPD profile for two different trees was between 6.75 × 10-5 and 4.82 × 10-14. A dendrogram was constructed using Ward's minimum variance algorithm based on chi-square distances. This led to a more clear-cut classification of profiles than the classical approach of unweighted pair group method with arithmetic average. Twenty-four clusters of RAPD profiles were shown in Ward's dendrogram. Reliability of the dendrogram structure was checked using variance analysis. RAPD data exhibited an acceptable resolving power for cultivar identification. A combination of three primers was proposed for rapid molecular identification of cultivars in collections and in nurseries.

Free access

Abstract

Horizontal starch gel electrophoresis was applied to the study of almond identification [Prunus amygdalus Batsch, syn. P. dulcis (Mill.) D.A. Webb] using pollen from 44 cultivars of different origin. Variability was found in all of the nine enzymatic systems analyzed (PGM, AAT, GPI, LAP, 6PGD, AcP, CAT, IDH, and ADH). The enzymatic systems with the highest discriminating possibilities were PGM, CAT, AcP, and LAP. This variability enabled the 44 cultivars to be distinguished with the exception of two pairs.

Open Access
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No information is available regarding endogenous soluble carbohydrate accumulation in buffalograss [Buchloe dactyloides (Nutt.) Engelm.] during cold acclimation. The objective of this study was to determine composition of soluble carbohydrates and their relationship to freezing tolerance in two buffalograss cultivars, 609 and NE 91-118, with different freezing tolerances. The experiment was conducted under natural cold acclimation conditions in two consecutive years in Fort Collins, Colo. Based upon average LT50 (subfreezing temperature resulting in 50% mortality) from seven sampling intervals in 1998-99 and six sampling intervals in 1999-2000, `NE 91-118' survived 4.5 °C and 4.9 °C colder temperatures than `609', during the 1998-1999 and 1999-2000 winter seasons, respectively. Glucose, fructose, sucrose, and raffinose were found in both cultivars in both years, and were generally higher in acclimated than pre- and post-acclimated stolons. Stachyose was not present in sufficient quantities for quantification. Cultivar NE 91-118 contained 63% to 77% more glucose and 41% to 51% more raffinose than `609' in the 1998-99 and 1999-2000 winter seasons, respectively. In 1999-2000, fructose content in `NE 91-118' was significantly higher than that of `609'. A significant negative correlation was found between LT50 vs. all carbohydrates in 1999-2000, and LT50 vs. sucrose and raffinose in 1998-99. Results suggest that soluble carbohydrates are important in freezing tolerance of buffalograss.

Free access

Two newly released cultivars of small watermelons [Citrullus lunatus (Thumb.) Matsum and Naki], `Mickylee' and `Minilee', plus two other cultivars, Baby Fun and Sugar Baby, were stored at various temperatures from 1 to 21C for up to 4 weeks plus 1 week at 21C over two seasons. All cultivars were susceptible to chilling injury (CI) when stored below 7C; however, `Minilee' was less susceptible than the other cultivars tested. Chilling injury increased with storage length. Conditioning at 26C for 3 days before storage at 1C reduced CI and increased the percentage of marketable watermelons after storage. Decay percentage increased with storage time and was highest on fruit held at 1C where CI led to decay. The flesh of `Mickylee' and `Minilee' was firmer than that of the other cultivars tested and `Mickylee' and Minilee' retained their firmness better during storage. Total soluble solids concentration decreased with increased storage temperature. `Minilee' watermelons were superior to the other three cultivars in postharvest storage potential and exhibited the least CI and decay.

Free access

The National Olive Variety Assessment (NOVA) collection, established at the Roseworthy Campus of the University of Adelaide, contains six replicate trees of 100 olive (Olea europaea L.) accessions grown in the same environment. The DNA fingerprints of these accessions were compared, using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), to those of a number of cultivars obtained from international collections. A total of 86 uniquely named accessions in the NOVA collection resulted in 58 different genotypes. Different names were synonyms for the same genotype, and homonyms were also found where accessions with the same name had different DNA fingerprints. A rapid and efficient protocol was developed to identify unknown olive genotypes using a two-stage process. Data from DNA fingerprints were added to a matrix already containing binary data from recognized standard cultivars. The estimated probability of any given RAPD profile randomly occurring at this stage ranged between 6 × 10-4 and 2 × 10-8. In the second stage, the approximate identity of the unknown genotype, revealed by the resulting dendrogram, was confirmed by comparing it with appropriate standards under identical conditions of DNA amplification and band separation. The data collected in this report form the basis of a genetic database that can be used for the identification of olive samples.

Free access

In total, 25 clones of Vitis vinifera `Pinot noir' and 22 clones of `Chardonnay' were analyzed with 100 microsatellite markers, selected from an initial screening of 228 markers. Of the 100 markers, 17 detected polymorphism within one or both of the cultivars. In `Pinot noir', 15 polymorphic markers detected 15 different genotypes, uniquely distinguished 12 clones out of the 25 and separated the remaining 13 clones into 3 groups. In `Chardonnay', 9 polymorphic markers detected 9 genotypes and uniquely distinguished 6 clones out of the 22. The remaining 16 clones were separated into 3 groups. For markers that were polymorphic in `Pinot noir' and `Chardonnay', none of the variant alleles were common to both cultivars. It is inferred from this result that the natural cross that produced `Chardonnay' probably occurred when `Pinot' was still relatively young. Many of the variant genotypes were expressed as three alleles. Further analysis revealed the presence of chimeras in which the third allele was present in leaf but not root or wood tissues, confirming that the grape apical meristem is functionally two-layered. Some clones that share the same microsatellite genotype are documented to have originated in the same locality, suggesting that the origins of undocumented clones may be traced by comparing their microsatellite genotypes with those of well-documented clones. Because clones of `Pinot noir' and `Chardonnay' are often visually indistinguishable, microsatellite genotyping may also be useful to detect identification errors in collections and nurseries.

Free access

Abstract

Protein and active enzymes were extracted from leaves of 8 rose cultivars. Extracts were run on polyacrylamide gels and stained for total protein, peroxidase, esterase, malate dehydrogenase, cytochrome oxidase, phenoloxidase, and polyphenoloxidase. Three leaf positions on each cultivar were sampled in an attempt to determine a sampling standard. Because of differences in growth habit among the cultivars, and different optimum locations for the enzymes, a standard location could not be set. Banding data were tabulated and used to prepare coefficient of similarity values and flow charts showing separations. All cultivars could be distinguished by differences in their enzyme banding patterns if results from several systems were employed.

Open Access

Abstract

Horizontal starch gel electrophoresis was used to study the variation of aspartate aminotransferase (AAT-1), glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI-2), leucine aminopeptidase (LAP-1) and phosphoglucomutase (PGM-1 and PGM-2) isozymes in 76 cultivars and accessions of almond. Cultivars could be separated into 40 classes for identification. Relationships among cultivars, based on historical records and isozyme similarities, show an original pool of seedling selections made before 1900. Most later-introduced cultivars are offspring or descendents of ‘Nonpareil’ and ‘Mission’ (‘Texas Prolific’), the other dominant parent.

Open Access

Shoot and root growth were measured on Chinese juniper (Juniperus chinensis L. `Torulosa', `Sylvestris', `Pfitzeriana', and `Hetzii') 1, 2, and 3 years after planting from 1l-liter black plastic containers. Mean diameter of the root system expanded quadratically, whereas mean branch spread increased linearly. Three years after planting, root spread was 2.75 times branch spread, and roots covered an area 5.5 times that covered by the branches. Percentage of total root length located within the dripline of the plants remained fairly constant for each cultivar during the 3 years following planting. Root length density increased over time but decreased with distance from the trunk. During the first 2 years after planting, shoot mass increased faster than root mass. In the 3rd year, the root system increased in mass at a faster rate than the shoots. Root length was correlated with root weight. Root spread and root area were correlated with trunk cross-sectional area, branch spread, and crown area.

Free access