Search Results

You are looking at 91 - 100 of 3,131 items for :

  • vegetable production x
Clear All

61 WORKSHOP 1 (Abstr. 1020-1035) Efficient Use of Minerals to Produce High Yield and Optimum Quality Fruit, Vegetables, and Ornamentals

Free access

Best management practices (BMPs) for vegetable crops are under development nationwide and in Florida. One goal of the Florida BMP program is to minimize the possible movement of nitrate-nitrogen from potato (Solanum tuberosum) production to surface water in the St. Johns River watershed without negatively impacting potato yields or quality. Current fertilizer BMPs developed for the area focus on fertilizer rate. Controlled-release fertilizers (CRF) have long been a part of nutrient management in greenhouse and nursery crops. However, CRFs have been seldom used in field-vegetable production because of their cost and release characteristics. Nutrient release curves for CRFs are not available for the soil moisture and temperature conditions prevailing in the seepage-irrigated soils of northern Florida. Controlled-leaching studies (pot-in-pot) in 2000 and 2001 have shown that plant-available nitrogen (N) was significantly higher early in the season from ammonium nitrate, calcium nitrate and urea compared to selected CRFs. However, N release from off-the-shelf and experimental CRFs was too slow, resulting in N recoveries ranging from 13% to 51%. Cost increase due to the use of CRFs for potato production ranged from $71.66 to $158.14/ha ($29 to $64 per acre) based on cost of material and N application rate. This higher cost may be offset by reduced application cost and cost-share pro-grams. Adoption of CRF programs by the potato (and vegetable) industry in Florida will depend on the accuracy and predictability of N release, state agencies' commitment to cost-share programs, and CRFs manufacturers' marketing strategies. All interested parties would benefit in the development of BMPs for CRFs.

Full access

Velvetbean (Mucuna deeringiana L.) has been used as part of the crop rotation in low-input vegetable production in southern Georgia to help suppress populations of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita) for the past 2 years. Over-wintering cover crops of crimson and subterranean clovers were used the low-input plots and rye was the plow-down cover crop in the conventional plots. Tomatoes, peppers, and eggplant were the vegetable crops grown in these production systems. Following the final harvest in 1992, use of nematicides in the low-input plots was discontinued and velvetbean was then planted into the low-input plots and disked in after 90 days. Results from the 1993–94 soil samples taken before and after velvetbean showed a continuing trend of reduced nematode numbers where velvetbean had been, while most conventional plots that had nematicides applied resulted in increases in nematode populations.

Free access
Author:

It is often difficult to obtain information on producing vegetables using `sustainable' practices such as reduced inputs of pesticide and commercial fertilizers. Lack of such information is often cited by conventional farmers and extension agents as a reason for not adopting or assisting others in adopting sustainable techniques. As part of a Southern Region Low Input Sustainable Agricultural (LISA) Program, we are compiling a database which will include techniques for vegetable production acceptable to `organic' farmers as well as those acceptable to conventional farmers. This information source will include information on 17 specific vegetables and well as chapters on general topics such as cover crops and weed control. We hope to make this information available both as a production manual and by way of an electronic information retrieval system. Steps in the development of this project include initially soliciting input from farmers and extension workers on the preferred content and format and conducting an on-going evaluation by these groups as segments are developed. The database should be available within 2 years in both electronic and hardcopy versions.

Free access
Author:

Abstract

The Philippines have available more complete meteorological data than do many other tropical countries. Thus, the situation there can serve as a basis for the discussion of the aerial environment of the tropics and the way in which the environment influences the growing of vegetables.

Open Access

have been made to study long-term effects of organic management in vegetable production ( Arthur et al., 2011 ; Idowu et al., 2009 ; Mitchell et al., 2007 ; Ozores-Hampton et al., 2012 ). Beyond these long-term studies, the effects of soil management

Full access
Author:

Many factors influence appropriate drip irrigation management, including system design, soil characteristics, crop and growth stage, and environmental conditions. The influences of these factors can be integrated into a practical, efficient scheduling system that determines quantity and timing of drip irrigation. This system combines direct soil moisture measurement with a water budget approach using evapotranspiration estimates and crop coefficients.

Full access
Author:

Abstract

Many vegetables are highly perishable and must be harvested within a very short time frame. Soon after harvesting, the vegetables must be handled carefully, processed, properly stored or consumed fresh. Research and experience have shown that successful harvest mechanization requires a systems approach and involves the cooperative efforts of engineers, plant breeders, plant physiologists, food scientists, and others. It is truly an interdisciplinary approach.

Open Access

There are three objectives for this study: to determine the within-row plant spacing and time of planting that will produce optimal yields and seed isoflavone content, to explore the feasibility of incorporating edamame soybeans in a double-cropping system with strawberries, and to study the potential as an edamame soybean of newly identified line TN03-349. TN03-349 was planted into black plastic, irrigated strawberry beds in an East Tennessee location at five different within-row spacings (7.62, 15.24, 30.48, 60.96, and 121.92 cm) in 2004 and 2005. Another strawberry bed planting was located in Middle Tennessee in 2005. Four soybean lines and two planting dates were used in the Middle Tennessee experiment. Two lines are high yielding soybean checks, while the third is a commercially available edamame cultivar. The fourth line is TN03-349. Planting dates were 24 May and 14 June 2005. A final field experiment utilized the same four soybean lines and planting dates with an additional planting on 6 July 2005. Four different within-row spacings were used, as well. All experimental plantings were harvested at both the R6 (green) and R8 (dry) stages. Preliminary data indicates that isoflavone content was not affected by within-row spacing in the 2004 East Tennessee strawberry bed experiment. Yield data from the same experiment seems to indicate that soybeans were able to compensate for fewer plants per row at the 7, 62, 15.24, and 30.48 cm spacings. Yield dropped sharply at the 60.96 and 121.92 cm treatments. Line TN03-349 produced beans with large seed size and nutty flavor, traits that are essential for edamame soybeans.

Free access