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Erin R. Haramoto and Daniel C. Brainard

, M.G. Brownie, C. 2009 Sorghum sudangrass as a summer cover and hay crop for organic fall cabbage production Renewable Agr. and Food Systems 24 225 233 Franczuk, J. Kosterna, E. Zaniewicz-Bajkowska, A. 2010 Weed-control effects on different types of

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Ted S. Kornecki, Francisco J. Arriaga and Andrew J. Price

Cover crops are an integral element in no-till conservation systems because they provide important benefits to soils and plants. Covers must produce large amounts of biomass to maximize these benefits ( Brady and Weil, 1999 ). A commonly used cover

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Alyssa H. Cho, Carlene A. Chase, Danielle D. Treadwell, Rosalie L. Koenig, John Bradley Morris and Jose Pablo Morales-Payan

typical cover crop seeding rate for sunn hemp. An intermediate seeding rate of 28 kg·ha −1 was included as a result of interest in developing sunn hemp seed production as an alternative enterprise for organic growers during the summer off-season. We

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Thomas Björkman and Joseph W. Shail Jr.

summer weeds can be problematic in fallow fields. Cover cropping can provide effective weed control, but the practice must be simple to implement. In the northeastern United States, there are few options available fitting the requirement for a rapid

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Chandrappa Gangaiah*, Edward E. Carey and Ned A. Tisserat

Compost teas, made using an aerated brewing process, have been reported to have potential for controlling a range of plant diseases and improving crop health. Septoria leaf spot of tomato, caused by the fungus Septoria lycopersici, is a common and destructive disease of tomato in Kansas. A field trial was conducted at Wichita, Kansas during Summer 2003 to evaluate the potential of pre-plant compost, and compost tea applied as a foliar spray or through drip fertigation, to control Septoria leaf spot of tomato. The experimental design included three factors: Pre-plant application of 13N-13P-13K or vermicompost; fertigation with CaNO3 or compost tea; and foliar spray with compost tea, fungicide (Dithane) or water. A split plot design was used with fertigation treatments as main plots and the other two factors as sub-plots. There were 3 replications. Tomato cultivar Merced was used and individual plots consisted of 5 plants grown on beds covered with red plastic mulch and supported by stake and weave system. Aerated compost tea was brewed weekly using a vermicompost-based recipe including alfalfa pellets, molasses, humic acid, fish emulsion and yucca extract and applied to plots starting 2 weeks after transplanting. Disease incidence and severity were recorded weekly for 3 weeks following the appearance of disease. Plots were harvested twice weekly and counts of No. 1, No 2 and cull grade tomatoes were recorded. There were no effects of pre-plant or fertigation treatments on Septoria leaf spot disease, but there was a significant effect due to foliar sprays, with mean severity of compost-tea-sprayed plots (26.3%) and fungicide-sprayed plots (31.9%) significantly lower than water-sprayed plots (45.9%) at trial termination.

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organic amendment was fertilizer specific. Cover Crop an Economic Boon for Summer Squash Production The costs associated with the planting and termination of cover crops sometimes are regarded as barriers to the adoption of this practice, due to the lack

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Dana Jokela and Ajay Nair

research should evaluate spring- and summer-planted cover crops that mature and can be ended mechanically at different times of the year. Literature Cited Abdul-Baki, A.A. Teasdale, J.R. Korcak, R. Chitwood, D.J. Huettel, R.N. 1996 Fresh-market tomato

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Jeffrey P. Mitchell, Karen M. Klonsky, Eugene M. Miyao, Brenna J. Aegerter, Anil Shrestha, Daniel S. Munk, Kurt Hembree, Nicholaus M. Madden and Thomas A. Turini

have found, for example, benefits from their cover crops being left in place on the bed tops as mulch and not being incorporated as green manure. They witnessed better weed control during the winter and summer (except for field bindweed) as well as

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Howard F. Harrison Jr., D. Michael Jackson, Judy A. Thies, Richard L. Fery and J. Powell Smith

are valued as a summer cover crop ( Clark, 2007 ), because they thrive in hot moist environments, grow well in low-fertility soils, and their vigorous growth smothers weeds. They can fix up to 220 kg·ha −1 nitrogen and are an excellent source of

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Monica Ozores-Hampton

.O. Lazarovits, G. 2002 Effect of organic fertilizer applications on growth, yield and pests of vegetables crops Proc. Florida State Hort. Soc. 115 315 321 Creamer, N.G. Baldwin, K.R. 1999 Summer cover crops. North Carolina Coop. Ext. Serv. HIL-37. 3 Mar. 2012