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Coconut fiber dust (coir) is being used as a peat substitute or amendment to potting mixes with varied results. However, its microbial composition and compatibility with beneficial microbes that might be added to growth media in the nursery, such as mycorrhizal fungi, has not been determined. In this study, coir was amended to a peat-based medium (15%, 30%, 45%, and 60% by volume) to determine its effects on growth of several ornamental plants and on the formation and function of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus intraradices. Mycorrhizae formed as well, and usually better, in all the coir-amended peat treatments as in peat alone. The magnitude of growth enhancement due to mycorrhizae was small for the plants tested in these media compared to that which usually occurs in soil-based media. In this experiment, plant growth responses appeared to be independent of level of mycorrhizal colonization and were plant species dependent. Consistent growth enhancement from mycorrhizae only occurred with marigold (Tagetes patula). With germander (Teucrium fruticans), growth was depressed with mycorrhizal inoculation in the medium composed of 60% coir. Growth of lavender (Lavandula augustifolia) was depressed in all coir-amended media, with or without AM inoculation, compared to the nonamended control. These results confirm previous reports of varied response of plant species to coir, and indicate the lack of any detrimental effects of coir on mycorrhiza formation.

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fertilization practices, irrigation strategies, alternative landscape plant species (e.g., native ornamentals instead of turfgrass, plants requiring low water input), and structural features (e.g., swales, green roofs, rain gardens). However, the impacts of

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The objective of this study is to determine the phytotoxicity and efficiency of oxadiazon and sethoxydim used as herbicide in the production of four species of woody ornamental plants grown in containers. Four species were used: Cornus alba `Argenteo Marginata', Weigela florida `Rumba', Prunus x cistena and Thuja occidentalis `Woodwardii'. Six herbicide treatments were used (oxadiazon at 0,4 and 8 Kg (a.i.)/ha; sethoxydim at 0.000, 0.276 and 0.552 Kg (a.i.)/ha) and two controls were added (weeding and unweeding). The eight treatments were included in a complete block design replicated six times. This project was started in July 1993 and was conducted for three months. If phytotoxic symptoms were present on plants they were recorded and their effects on growth was measured. At the end of the experiment, weeds present in pots were identified, counted and their growth measured. Preliminary results showed that oxadiazon applied at rates of 4 and 8 Kg (a.i.)/ha had a good efficiency weed control in container production. Sethoxydim applied at rates of 0.276 and 0.552 Kg (a.i.)/ha had a good grass control. The two herbicides did not show phytotoxic symptoms on the for species used. The effects of herbicides on plant growth will be presented.

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Container production of ornamental plants requires large amounts of nitrogen (N) and other nutrients due to N-binding by pine bark and related substrate components, as well as extensive leaching that typically occurs in well-drained substrates

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.C. Yeager, T.H. 2003 Plant canopy affects sprinkler irrigation application efficiency of container-grown ornamentals HortScience 38 1373 1377 Bilderback, T. Boyer, C. Chappell, M. Fain, G. Fare, D. Gilliam, C. Jackson, B. Lea-Cox, J. LeBude, A. Niemiera, A

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The present high cost of maintenance is a key factor in every sector of landscape industry. Weed control is a particularly expensive aspect of maintenance and land managers constantly are seeking more effective methods of control. Since soil cultivation is laborious and expensive, herbicides and mulches are becoming popular in many countries. In contrast to herbicides, which have become widely used in ornamentals only in the past 20 years, mulching has been used for centuries.

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Fire flash (Chlorophytum amaniense), a member of Liliaceae, is attracting considerable attention in the foliage plant industry as a new addition for interior plantscaping. Coral-colored petioles and midribs contrasting with dark green leaves make it a sought after specimen. Originally collected from rainforests of eastern Africa in 1902, it has remained largely obscure for a century. Recently, studies on fire flash's propagation, production, and interiorscape performance have been completed. This report presents relevant botanical information and the results of our 4-year evaluation of this plant. Fire flash can be propagated through seed, division, or tissue culture and produced as a potted foliage plant under light levels from 114 to 228 μmol·m–2·s–1 and temperatures from 18 to 32 °C. Finished plants after being placed in building interiors are able to maintain their aesthetic appearances under a light level as low as 8 μmol·m–2·s–1 for 8 months or longer.

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Shoot tip explants of 12 woody species and cultivars of Rosaceae were cultured in vitro on Linsmaier and Skoog nutrient medium containing benzylamino purine (BA). Greatest shoot proliferation occurred in the presence of 0.1 to 2.5 mg/liter BA and was species-dependent. Root initiation was promoted when 1 to 10 mg/liter indolebutyric acid (IBA) was added to the medium. Rooting increased when cultures were incubated in the dark for 1 week prior to illuminated incubation.

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Abstract

The citrus whitefly, Dialeurodes citri (Ashmead), prefers Gardenia jasminoides Ellis cv. August Beauty to G. jasminoides cv. Radicans, Viburnum odoratis- simum Ker-Gawl, and Ligustrum sinense Lour. cv. Variegata for egg deposition. Mean numbers of citrus whiteflies found in subsequent life stages (after the egg) remained significantly higher on G. jasminoides cv. August Beauty. These four host plants of the citrus whitefly are major production and landscape items in the south; therefore, segregation of cultivars most heavily infested by the pest is an important consideration when planning control strategies.

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