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M. Kellerhals and A. Aeppli. XII A 277 x Elstar; selected 1987; USPP 19,615; 6 Jan. 2009. Fruit: broad globose to conical globose to conical; medium, 77 mm diameter; little crowning; little greasiness; high amount and intensity of orange-red to red

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. Decay is characterized by external lesions and often only part of the internal flesh is red, whereas the unaffected flesh remains white. Unlike most postharvest decays in other crops, there is little spread of disease from infected to healthy fruit in

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cultivars were Camelot (Seminis, Oxnard, CA), Lafayette (Siegers Seed Co., Holland, MI), Sirius (Siegers Seed Co., Holland, MI), and Stiletto (Rogers, Boise, ID). ‘Camelot’ (red fruit) and ‘Lafayette’ (yellow fruit) are susceptible to Tomato spotted wilt

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grapefruits ( Kawada, 1980 ), whereas mature green fruit developed CI symptoms and appeared to be more sensitive to low temperatures than red-ripe pepper fruit ( Lin et al., 1993 ). However, little additional information has been documented on the relationship

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Strawberry ( Fragaria sp.) is a perennial herb in the Rosaceae family. The flower petals usually are white and the fruit color is mostly red, with only a small proportion of white or pink fruit for cultivation ( Darrow 1966 ). Approximately 300

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= no red color and 9 = red color covering the entire fruit surface. In the spring after the thinning treatments, the total number of flower clusters per tree was counted as a measure of return bloom. Statistical analysis. The data were evaluated by

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. Description Compared with ‘Contorta’, grafted trees of ‘Red Dragon’ are slightly more vigorous with a desirable growth habit that is spreading rather than pendulous and have moderate branching ( Figs. 2 and 3 ). Too little branching would result in a “leggy

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colorimeter (ColorFlex EZ; Hunter Associates Laboratory, Reston, VA, USA) was used to quantify lightness, chroma, and hue on the green and red fruit peels of each fruit. Fruit firmness was measured with a fruit texture analyzer (GS-20; Güss Manufacturing Ltd

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were newly released in the 20-year period from 1994 to 2014 ( Clark et al., 2008 ; Finn and Clark, 2014 ; Moore and Kempler, 2012 ). Cultivars with various colors of fruit such as red, black, purple, and yellow have been developed through cross- and

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The New York strawberry (Fragaria ×ananassa) industry is focused on sale of relatively short term storage cultivars that are ripe at harvest. Although storage of harvested fruit at low temperatures is generally recommended, growers have reported reduced fruit quality in the market after low temperature storage. Therefore we have explored the potential for using intermediate temperatures for strawberry storage. Physical qualities and antioxidant composition of the Jewel cultivar stored in 75%, 85%, or 95% RH at 0.5, 10, and 20 °C for 4 days have been studied. Overall quality declined more rapidly at 20 °C, especially at 95% RH, than at 10 °C and 0.5 °C. There was little change in weight loss at 0.5, 10, and 20 °C for 2 days but it increased at the lowest RH at 10 °C and increased rapidly from day 3 at 20 °C in lower RHs. Firmness was maintained, or even increased, at 0.5 or 10 °C than 20 °C, but soluble solids concentrations were lower at higher than lower storage temperatures. Red color development and anthocyanin concentrations were controlled more at 0.5 or 10 °C than at 20 °C. Total phenolic compounds were higher at 20 °C than at other temperatures at all RHs. The total antioxidant capacity of berries was higher at 10 °C than at 0.5 or 20 °C. However, total ascorbic acid concentrations, flavonoid contents, and were not affected by RH and temperature. In conclusion, while the best temperature for long term storage is 0.5 °C, quality can be maintained at 10 °C for acceptable periods of time. High RH environments increase the loss of quality at higher storage temperatures. Higher storage temperatures may cause faster ripening and accumulation of antioxidant compounds, but marketable quality of the fruit may be reduced.

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