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72 ORAL SESSION 21 (Abstr. 147-153) Vegetable (Cucurbit): Breeding and Genetics

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72 ORAL SESSION 21 (Abstr. 147-153) Vegetable (Cucurbit): Breeding and Genetics

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72 ORAL SESSION 21 (Abstr. 147-153) Vegetable (Cucurbit): Breeding and Genetics

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transport-associated genes coincided with periods of rapid cell expansion ( Schlosser et al., 2008 ). Cucurbit fruit can grow extremely rapidly to produce immense fruit. Pumpkins ( Cucurbita pepo ) have been recorded in excess of 400 kg, and watermelons

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 al. 2009 ). However, organic growers of cucurbit (Cucurbitaceae spp.) crops such as muskmelon ( Cucumis melo ) lose >$100 million annually in the eastern half of the United States because of bacterial wilt, which is caused by Erwinia tracheiphila

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Phytophthora capsici is a destructive pathogen of cucurbit and solanaceous vegetables. All cultivars of squash are considered susceptible to phytophthora root, crown, and fruit rot ( Babadoost and Islam, 2003 ; Cafe et al., 1995 ); losses in

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ZYMV impacts cucurbit production around the world. Desbiez and Lecoq (1997) list more than 62 countries in all regions of the world where ZYMV has been reported. This member of the Potyviridae family has been known since 1973, when it was first

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Cucurbit vegetables are predominantly out-crossers and depend on insect pollinators to transfer pollen from staminate to pistillate or hermaphroditic flowers for fruit set and development ( Robinson and Decker-Walters, 1997 ). Although there are

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