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Abstract

‘Viva’, a new sweet cherry from Vineland, the cover photograph, is the most recent of a long line of sweet cherry cultivar developed here. This year's A.S.H.S. meetings will be held in Ontario along with the Canadian Soceity's meeting. A review of this Province's research program in horticulture is threfore timely.

Open Access

Abstract

Why aren't there more women horticulturists in the United States? The large number of European women in this field always astonishes Americans traveling abroad. In certain Asian countries, e.g. Taiwan and Thailand, women are represented in horticulture classes in much larger numbers. (This may partly account for the extraordinarily high proportion of Oriental women graduate students in the U.S.) Recently, in our country there has been a noticeable increase in high school girls enrolled in agriculture and participating in FFA. There is also a substantial increase in number of college women majoring in horticulture. A poll of 43 Land Grant Institutions showed that women constitute 22% of undergraduate majors and 14% of our graduate students. A comparison of the present meager representation of women in academic positions (2%), employed by USDA (1.5%), and members of ASHS (1.7%) with the proportion of young women training for careers in horticulture demands a reevaluation of long-held assumptions that horticulture is a masculine occupation. Why such a high rate of attrition between undergraduate training and professional employment?

Open Access

Abstract

The ASHS Tropical Region was founded in 1951 by a group of enthusiastic horticulturists working in the Caribbean and Latin America. This group was greatly inspired by Wilson Popenoe, a visionary in tropical horticulture who was dedicated to actions supporting agricultural development and the conservation of resources in Central America.

Open Access

Science is a challenging subject to teach at the middle school level. The state of Louisiana requires public school teachers to plan their curriculum around Grade-Level Expectations or state mandated educational benchmarks. A program titled Horticulture in a Can has been designed to teach horticulture lessons to middle school students while targeting the state regulated grade-level expectations. All lessons use a hands-on approach as it has been proven more effective than traditional classroom teaching. Horticulture in a Can was developed by a cooperative effort between the Louisiana Sea Grant College Program and the LSU AgCenter's Department of Horticulture within the Coastal Roots Nursery Program. Eight lesson plans have been created to meet twenty-six Grade-Level Expectations for 463 students in 4 schools. Pre- and PostHorticulture tests were given to each class in addition to pre- and postChildren's Attitude Towards the Environment Scale (CATES). All tests were given to both treatment and control classes within each school. The evaluations tested both short and long-term memory on material contained in the lesson plans. The data was analyzed by school, treatment, sex, and grade-level.

Free access

Abstract

The Gambian climate is well-suited for the production of horticultural crops. There are two distinct seasons: a short wet season, from June until September, when temperatures and humidity are quite high; and a long dry seas the rest of the year. From November until March, the dry season is cool and especially suitable for the production of a wide variety of vegetables.

Open Access
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Abstract

In 1980, ASHS completed a survey of internship programs offered at institutions with 2- and 4-year horticulture programs and landscape architecture programs. The results indicated that 50% of 62 responding institutions had internship programs; however, the number of students taking advantage of existing programs was relatively small (1).

Open Access

Abstract

Humidity as related to horticulture is discussed in terms of: ways of expressing humidity levels; physical properties of water vapor; and temperature-humidity and air circulation-humidity interactions. The role of humidity in transpiration, killing freezes, and storage and transport of fruits and vegetables is discussed. Also given are sources of information on methods of recording and controlling humidity in postharvest applications.

Open Access

mistakes in data handling in publications, but how hard it was to get them fixed. Although there are many reasons why a statistical analysis may or may not be appropriate, only those most applicable to horticulture will be discussed below. We examined

Open Access

mistakes in data handling in publications, but how hard it was to get them fixed. Although there are many reasons why a statistical analysis may or may not be appropriate, only those most applicable to horticulture will be discussed below. We examined

Open Access

mistakes in data handling in publications, but how hard it was to get them fixed. Although there are many reasons why a statistical analysis may or may not be appropriate, only those most applicable to horticulture will be discussed below. We examined

Open Access