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  • Author or Editor: Yuan Yu x
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There is a growing body of literature that explores the benefits of school gardening for children, but few studies have been conducted in Taiwan. Even fewer studies have examined which factors influence the benefits that children derive from these activities. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore the benefits of school gardening for children in Taiwan and also identify the factors influencing these benefits. This study used qualitative research methods, which consisted of interviewing 43 elementary school students who had extensive experience with gardening, and used a general inductive approach to analyze the data. The study also used a quantitative approach to statistically compare gender differences, which found that there were some differences in preference for gardening between boys and girls in Taiwan. The results also identify seven benefits children can derive from school gardening, including increasing life skills, producing pleasant feelings, improving relationships and having plants as companions, acquiring new knowledge, experiencing the aroma and flavor of fruits and vegetables, improving health, and increasing connection to nature. Some of these benefits of school gardening have not been mentioned in previous studies and can be considered to be new, such as having plants as companions. Additionally, this study found 20 factors that influence the benefits of school gardening. Of these, eight were about plants, seven about activities, two about outdoor environments, and three about other participants. Most of the factors provide more than one benefit. The factors with the greatest impact have the most number of benefits that influence children and include “appearance, odor and texture,” “hands-on,” and “outdoor natural elements.” These factors help us to realize the unique characteristics of gardening, highlight the distinctiveness, and increase the indispensability of gardening activities.

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To reveal the genetic diversity and genetic relationships of China’s Bergenia germplasm, 28 Bergenia accessions from different regions in China were analyzed by 24 intersimple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. The results showed that 318 sites were amplified in all germplasm, including 307 polymorphic sites, and the percentage of polymorphic sites was 96.54%. Cluster analysis showed that the 28 accessions were divided into three categories, with a similarity coefficient of 0.5475. Bergenia purpurascens was clustered into one category; B. scopulosa was clustered into one category; and B. tianquaninsis, B. emeiensis, B. stracheyi, and B. crassifolia were clustered into one category. The results of the cluster analysis indicated that the 28 accessions were not completely classified by origin. Using the ISSR marker technique to analyze the phylogenetic relationship of Bergenia germplasm is helpful for identifying valuable resources and providing a theoretical basis for the selection of breeding parents.

Open Access

Citrus (Citrus sp.) germplasm collections are a valuable resource for citrus genetic breeding studies, and further utilization of the resource requires knowledge of their genotypic and phylogenetic relationships. Diverse citrus accessions, including citron (Citrus medica), mandarin (Citrus reticulata), pummelo (Citrus maxima), papeda (Papeda sp.), trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata), kumquat (Fortunella sp.), and related species, have been housed at the Florida Citrus Arboretum, Winter Haven, FL, but the accessions in the collection have not been genotyped. In this study, a collection of 80 citrus accessions were genotyped using 1536 sweet orange–derived single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, to determine their SNP fingerprints and to assess genetic diversity, population structure, and phylogenetic relationships, and thereby to test the efficiency of using the single genotype-derived SNP chip with relatively low cost for these analyses. Phylogenetic relationships among the 80 accessions were determined by multivariate analysis. A model-based clustering program detected five basic groups and revealed that C. maxima introgressions varied among mandarin cultivars and segregated in mandarin F1 progeny. In addition, reciprocal differences in C. maxima contributions were observed among citranges (Citrus sinensis × P. trifoliata vs. P. trifoliata × C. sinensis) and may be caused by the influence of cytoplasmic DNA and its effect on selection of cultivars. Inferred admixture structures of many secondary citrus species and important cultivars were confirmed or revealed, including ‘Bergamot’ sour orange (Citrus aurantium), ‘Kinkoji’ (C. reticulata × Citrus paradisi), ‘Hyuganatsu’ orange (Citrus tamurana), and palestine sweet lime (Citrus aurantifolia). The relatively inexpensive SNP array used in this study generated informative genotyping data and led to good consensus and correlations with previously published observations based on whole genome sequencing (WGS) data. The genotyping data and the phylogenetic results may facilitate further exploitation of interesting genotypes in the collection and additional understanding of phylogenetic relationships in citrus.

Free access

Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been proven to be a multifunctional signaling molecule in plants. In this study, we attempted to explore the effects of H2S on the climacteric fruit tomato during postharvest storage. H2S fumigation for 1 d was found to delay the peel color transition from green to red and decreased fruit firmness induced by ethylene. Further investigation showed that H2S fumigation downregulated the activities and gene expressions of cell wall–degrading enzymes pectin lyase (PL), polygalacturonase (PG), and cellulase. Furthermore, H2S fumigation downregulated the expression of ethylene biosynthesis genes SlACS2 and SlACS3. Ethylene treatment for 1 d was found to induce the expression of SlACO1, SlACO3, and SlACO4 genes, whereas the increase was significantly inhibited by H2S combined with ethylene. Furthermore, H2S decreased the transcript accumulation of ethylene receptor genes SlETR5 and SlETR6 and ethylene transcription factors SlCRF2 and SlERF2. The correlation analysis suggested that the fruit firmness was negatively correlated with ethylene biosynthesis and signaling pathway. The current study showed that exogenous H2S could inhibit the synthesis of endogenous ethylene and regulate ethylene signal transduction, thereby delaying fruit softening and the ripening process of tomato fruit during postharvest storage.

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