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Young-Sang Lee, Yong-Sun Lee and Chang-Sung Kang

The cut Lilium oriental hybrid `Casablanca' was pulsed with chitosan (MW = 5000–10,000), grapefruit seed extract (GFSE), GA, and sucrose and enclosed with a polyethylene (PE) film of different perforations before packing into a cardboard box. Simulated transport (ST) was conducted by storing plants at 22 °C for 3 days, and the flower opening and weight loss during ST as well as post-ST floral longevity were evaluated. Pulsing with 600 ppm chitosan effectively reduced open flower percentage and weight loss during ST by 6.5% and 36%, respectively. The same concentration of chitosan, however, slightly decreased post-ST floral longevity. Adding 8% sucrose and 100 ppm GA enhanced chitosan effects. In contrast to chitosan, 500 ppm GFSE increased flower opening during ST. Enclosing plants with perforated PE film significantly reduced weight loss during ST, but increased flower opening although no ethylene accumulation over 0.08 ppm was detected in enclosed atmosphere. The opening of flowers during ST also increased in proportion to the time delay between harvest and pulsing.

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Young-Sang Lee, Yong-Sun Lee and Chang-Sung Kang

The practicality of utilizing chitosan (MW = 5000-10,000) as a natural antimicrobial compound to reduce soybean sprout rot was tested. Soybean seeds were soaked for 6 h in solutions containing different levels of chitosan and acetic acid (glacial), and cultivated at 25 °C for 5 days. Soaking seeds with 1000 ppm chitosan increased germination percentage, hypocotyl thickness, total length, and fresh weight of sprouts by 4%, 5%, 2%, and 1%, respectively. The total sprout yield was increased by chitosan in a concentration-dependent manner in that 1000 ppm chitosan resulted in 8% increment of total yield (7.47 kg sprouts/kg seed). Compared to control (13.8%), chitosan significantly reduced sprout rot percentage to 7.0%, and consequently enhanced the marketable sprout yield by 39%. Although 100 ppm acetic acid also decreased sprout rot percentage to 11.8%, its yield-increasing effects were not as prominent as chitosan.