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Eun Young Yang*, Hye Jin Lee and Yong-Beom Lee

The application of a closed hydroponic system for rose poses some horticultural problems. The nutrient uptake by the plants changes constantly depending upon environmental conditions and growing stages, which results in the imbalanced composition of the drained solution and aggravates root environmental conditions. This research was aimed to observe the effect of mineral nutrient control method on the nutrient solution management in a closed hydroponic system. Single-node cutting rose `Versillia' was grown in aeroponics and DFT system and was irrigated with the nutrient solution of the Univ. of Seoul (NO3 -N 8.8, NH4 -N 0.67, P 2.0, K 4.8, Ca 4.0, and Mg 2.0 me·L-1). Recirculated nutrient solution was managed by five different control method: macro- and micro-element control in aeroponic system (M&M); macroelement control in aeroponic system (M); nutrient solution supplement in aeroponic system (S); electrical conductivity (EC) control in aeroponic system (EC-A); EC control in deep flow technique system (EC-D). In the EC control method, the concentration of NO3 -N exceeds optimal range whereas P and Mg decreased at the later stage of plant growth. The overall mineral nutrient content increased with S. On the other hand, the nutrient content of root environment was maintained optimally with M&M and M.

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Eun Young Yang*, Jung-Sim Oh and Yong-Beom Lee

This experiment was carried out to observe the effect of mineral nutrient control in photosynthetic capacity of single-node cutting rose grown in a closed hydroponic system. Single-node cutting rose `Versillia' was grown in aeroponics and DFT system and was irrigated with the nutrient solution of the Univ. of Seoul (NO3 -N 8.8, NH4 -N 0.67, P 2.0, K 4.8, Ca 4.0, Mg 2.0 me·L-1). Recirculated nutrient solution was managed by five different control method: macro- and micro-element control in aeroponic system (M&M); macro-element control in aeroponic system (M); nutrient solution supplement in aeroponic system (S); electrical conductivity (EC) control in aeroponic system (EC-A); EC control in deep flow technique system (EC-D). The photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate at 35 days after transplant with M&M and M were higher compared to those with S, EC-A and EC-D. The maximal efficiency of photochemistry (Fv/Fm) was higher for M&M, M and S than that with EC-A and EC-D. Therefore, it is possible to increase photosynthetic capacity of rose with mineral nutrient control in recirculated nutrient solution.

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Eun Young Yang*, Keum Soon Park, Dong Soo Lee and Yong-Beom Lee

This study was conducted to understand the effect of different nutrient control method on the growth, cut-flower quality, root activity and fertilizer consumption. Single-node cutting rose `Versillia' was grown in aeroponics and DFT system and was irrigated with the nutrient solution of the Univ. of Seoul (NO3 -N 8.8, NH4 -N 0.67, P 2.0, K 4.8, Ca 4.0, Mg 2.0 me·L-1). Recirculated nutrient solution was managed by five different control method: macro- and micro-element control in aeroponic system (M&M); macroelement control in aeroponic system (M); nutrient solution supplement in aeroponic system (S); electrical conductivity (EC) control in aeroponic system (EC-A); EC control in deep flow technique system (EC-D). The mineral nutrient control method had significantly effected on the cut-flower quality. In the M&M and M, flower length, fresh weight and root activity were higher than those with other mineral nutrients control method. Although EC-A and EC-D could save total amount of fertilizer compared to M&M and M, the growth and quality of the rose with EC control system were lower than those with mineral nutrient control system. Therefore, these result suggest that EC control system is not economic method in a closed hydroponic system.

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Zai Q. Yang, Yong X. Li, Xiao P. Xue, Chuan R. Huang and Bo Zhang

Wind tunnel tests were conducted in an NH-2-type wind tunnel to investigate the wind pressure coefficients and their distribution on the surfaces of a single-span plastic greenhouse and a solar greenhouse. Wind pressures at numerous points on the surfaces of the greenhouse models were simultaneously measured for various wind directions. The critical wind speeds, at which damage occurred on the surfaces of single-span plastic greenhouses and solar greenhouses, were derived. To clearly describe the wind pressure distribution on various surface zones of the greenhouses, the end surface and top surface of the plastic greenhouse and the transparent surface of the solar greenhouse were divided into nine zones, which were denoted as Zone I to Zone IX. The results were as follows: 1) At wind direction angles of 0° and 45°, the end surface of the single-span plastic greenhouse was on the windward side, and the maximum positive wind pressure coefficient was near 1. At wind direction angles of 90° and 180°, the entire end surface of the single-span plastic greenhouse was on the leeward side, and the maximum negative wind pressure coefficient was near −1. The maximum positive wind pressure on the end surface of the single-span plastic greenhouse appeared in Zone IV at a wind direction angle of 15°, whereas the maximum negative pressure appeared in Zone VIII at a wind direction angle of 105°. 2) Most of the wind pressure coefficients on the top surface of the plastic greenhouse were negative. The maximum positive and negative wind pressure coefficient on the top surface of the plastic greenhouse occurred in Zones I and II, respectively, at a wind direction angle of 60°. 3) At a wind direction angle of 0°, the distribution of wind pressure coefficient contours was steady in the middle and lower zones of the transparent surface of the solar greenhouse, and the wind pressure coefficients were positive. At a wind direction angle of 90°, the wind pressure coefficients were negative on the transparent surface of the solar greenhouse. A maximum positive wind pressure coefficient was attained at a wind direction angle of 30° in Zone IX, whereas the maximum suction force occurred in Zone VII at a wind direction angle of 135°. 4) The minimum critical wind speeds required to impair the single-span plastic greenhouse and solar greenhouse were 14.5 and 18.9 m·s−1, respectively.

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Ming Cai, Ke Wang, Le Luo, Hui-tang Pan, Qi-xiang Zhang and Yu-yong Yang

Hydrangea macrophylla is the most popular species in the genus Hydrangea because of its large and brightly colored inflorescences. Since the early 1900s, numerous cultivars with showy flowers have been selected. Although many H. macrophylla cultivars have been developed, cold hardiness is still the major limitation to their outdoor use. Hydrangea arborescens is a small attractive shrub or subshrub native to northeastern parts of the United States, which is valued for its hardiness. Interspecific breeding of H. arborescens and H. macrophylla has been tried, but putative hybrid seedlings either died at an early stage or were not verified. We made successful hybridizations between H. macrophylla ‘Blue Diamond’ and H. arborescens ‘Annabelle’ and used in vitro ovary culture to produce viable plants. Hybrids were intermediate in appearance between parents, but variable in leaves, inflorescences, and flower color. The success of this hybridization was confirmed by six simple sequence repeat (SSR) genetic markers. The maternal chromosome number was 36, and the paternal number was 38. Chromosome counts of hybrids indicated that nearly half of them were aneuploids. Male fertility of progeny was evaluated by fluorescein diacetate staining of pollen. Twelve out of 14 hybrids (85.7%) had male fertility. We documented the first flowering progeny of H. macrophylla and H. arborescens, suggesting an effective beginning to a cold hardiness breeding program.

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Yong Yang, Xueyong Liu, Yuanli Jiang, Zuoxiang Xiang, Qingguo Xu, Na Zhao and Bichao Shu

Salt-affected soils may retard plant growth and cause metabolic alterations. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of salinity in deep soil on root growth and metabolic changes of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea). Tall fescue seeds (cv. Houndog V) were planted in polyvinylchloride (PVC) tubes (9 cm diameter × 45 cm long) for 2 months with three treatments of growth substances: (1) control, filled with peat-sand mixtures for full tubes (40 cm height, sand:organic fertilizers = 7:3, w/w); (2) T20, 20 cm saline soil covered with 20 cm organic fertilizers and sand; (3) T30, 30 cm saline soil covered with 10 cm organic fertilizers and sand. Turf quality and vertical shoot growth rate (VSGR) significantly decreased in T30, but not for T20, when compared with the control. Salinity in deep soil obviously inhibited the root growth as indicated by the lower root length, root projected area, root diameter, root fresh, and dry weight, but increased the level of amino acids (Asp, Glu, Ser, Gly, etc.) and soluble sugars (glucose, fructose, sucrose). Root activity in top layer (0–10 cm) of saline soil increased while decreased in deeper layer (20–40 cm) when compared with the control. The increase of root activity and free amino acids in roots from upper layer and the accumulation of soluble sugars in roots from deeper soil layer under salinity conditions were the adaptive responses and regulative mechanisms that for supporting the above-ground plant growth in tall fescue when exposed to deep soil salinity conditions. These results also suggested that a 20 cm of improved mixture of organic fertilizers with sand on the top of saline soil could be sufficient to supply basic space for the normal growth of turfgrass with regular spray irrigation.

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Yong Zhang, Chunxia Fu, Yujing Yan, Yan’an Wang, Ming Li, Meixiang Chen, Jianping Qian, Xinting Yang and Shuhan Cheng

This research was initiated to determine the response of apple (Malus ×domestica) fruit quality to sprays of zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) and sugar alcohol zinc. Two apple cultivars Fuji and Gala were evaluated, the leaf zinc (Zn) concentration of which were about 14.3 mg·kg−1 dry weight without Zn deficiency symptoms. The trees were sprayed with ZnSO4 and sugar alcohol zinc separately during four different developmental stages: 2 weeks before budbreak (P1), 3 weeks after bloom (P2), the termination of spring shoot growth (P3), and 4 weeks before harvest (P4). The fruit was harvested at maturity and analyzed for fruit quality and fruit Zn concentration. Zinc sprays during the four different developmental stages increased Zn concentration of peeled and washed fruit at harvest, without phytotoxicity. The treatments at stages P2 and P4 increased average fruit weight of ‘Gala’ and ‘Fuji’, respectively. The treatments at stages P1 and P4 increased the fruit firmness of ‘Gala’, while the treatments at stages P1 and P2 increased the fruit firmness of ‘Fuji’. The treatments at stages P1, P2, and P4 increased the soluble sugar and vitamin C of ‘Gala’ fruit, while the treatments at all the stages increased the soluble sugar and vitamin C of ‘Fuji’. And the effects of sugar alcohol zinc were equal and more pronounced than those of ZnSO4. Thus, Zn sprays at critical periods can improve fruit quality of apple trees, which show no Zn deficiency symptoms with leaf Zn concentration less than 15 mg·kg−1 dry weight.

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Zhuang-Zhuang Liu, Tao Chen, Fang-Ren Peng, You-Wang Liang, Peng-Peng Tan, Zheng-Hai Mo, Fan Cao, Yang-Juan Shang, Rui Zhang and Yong-Rong Li

Cytosine methylation plays important roles in regulating gene expression and modulating agronomic traits. In this study, the fluorescence-labeled methylation-sensitive amplified polymorphism (F-MSAP) technique was used to study variation in cytosine methylation among seven pecan (Carya illinoinensis) cultivars at four developmental stages. In addition, phenotypic variations in the leaves of these seven cultivars were investigated. Using eight primer sets, 22,796 bands and 950 sites were detected in the pecan cultivars at four stages. Variation in cytosine methylation was observed among the pecan cultivars, with total methylation levels ranging from 51.18% to 56.58% and polymorphism rates of 82.29%, 81.73%, 78.64%, and 79.09% being recorded at the four stages. Sufficiently accompanying the polymorphism data, significant differences in phenotypic traits were also observed among the pecan cultivars, suggesting that cytosine methylation may be an important factor underlying phenotypic variation. Hypermethylation was the dominant type of methylation among the four types observed, and full methylation occurred at higher levels than did hemimethylation in the pecan genomes. Cluster analysis and principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) identified Dice coefficients ranging from 0.698 to 0.778, with an average coefficient of 0.735, and the variance contribution rates of the previous three principal coordinates were 19.6%, 19.0%, and 18.2%, respectively. Among the seven pecan cultivars, four groups were clearly classified based on a Dice coefficient of 0.75 and the previous three principal coordinates. Tracing dynamic changes in methylation status across stages revealed that methylation patterns changed at a larger proportion of CCGG sites from the 30% of final fruit-size (30%-FFS) stage to the 70%-FFS stage, with general decreases in the total methylation level, the rate of polymorphism, and specific sites being observed in each cultivar. These results demonstrated that the F-MSAP technique is a powerful tool for quantitatively detecting cytosine methylation in pecan genomes and provide a new perspective for studying many important life processes in pecan.

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Suping Zhou, Roger J. Sauvé, Zong Liu, Sasikiran Reddy, Sarabjit Bhatti, Simon D. Hucko, Yang Yong, Tara Fish and Theodore W. Thannhauser

Three tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cultivars [Walter LA3465 (heat-tolerant), Edkawi LA 2711 (unknown heat tolerance, salt-tolerant), and LA1310 (cherry tomato)] were compared for changes in leaf proteomes after heat treatment. Seedlings with four fully expanded leaves were subjected to heat treatment of 39/25 °C at a 16:8 h light–dark cycle for 7 days. Leaves were collected at 1200 hr, 4 h after the light cycle started. For ‘Walter’ LA3465, heat-suppressed proteins were geranylgeranyl reductase, ferredoxin-NADP (+) reductase, Rubisco activase, transketolase, phosphoglycerate kinase precursor, fructose–bisphosphate aldolase, glyoxisomal malate dehydrogenase, catalase, S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase, and methionine synthase. Two enzymes were induced, cytosolic NADP-malic enzyme and superoxide dismutase. For ‘Edkawi’ LA2711, nine enzymes were suppressed: ferredoxin-NADP (+) reductase, Rubisco activase, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase, methioine synthase, glyoxisomal malate dehydrogenase, enolase, flavonol synthase, M1 family peptidase, and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase. Heat-induced proteins were cyclophilin, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase, transketolase, phosphoglycolate phosphatase, ATPase, photosystem II oxygen-evolving complex 23, and NAD-dependent epimerase/dehydratase. For cherry tomato LA1310, heat-suppressed proteins were aminotransferase, S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase, L-ascorbate peroxidase, lactoylglutathione lyase, and Rubisco activase. Heat-induced enzymes were glyoxisomal malate dehydrogenase, phosphoribulokinasee, and ATP synthase. This research resulted in the identification of proteins that were induced/repressed in all tomato cultivars evaluated (e.g., Rubisco activase, methionine synthase, adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase, and others) and those differentially expressed (e.g., transketolase).

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Ke-peng Che, Chun-yang Liang, Yue-guang Wang, De-min Jin, Bin Wang, Yong Xu, Guo-bing Kang and Hai-ying Zhang

Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analyses were used to assess genetic diversity among 30 genotypes of watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Mansf.] representing a broad genetic base, including breeding lines and commercial germplasm. Eight AFLP primer combinations selected from 64 primer combinations were polymophic. The polymorphism was 13.0% to 31.9% within the 28 cultivars examined, and 45.3% to 64.2% among all the genotypes. Each genotype could be successfully distinguished based on AFLP scoring. Cluster grouping of accessions based on the AFLP analysis was consistent with that from classification by pedigrees and ecotypes.