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  • Author or Editor: Y.M. Isenberg x
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Abstract

Hexaploid Vaccinium hybrid progenies, including F1, F1 intercross, F1 × F2, BC1, BC1 intercross, and BC1 × F2 crosses between V. ashei Reade and V. constablaei Gray, and an intercross between late-blooming V. ashei genotypes, established in the commercial blueberry production area in eastern North Carolina, were compared among themselves and with 2 highbush blueberry (V. corymbosum L.) cultivars for flowering, ripening, primary mummy berry infection, crop, and fruit characteristics. There were significant differences among progenies for all traits, with sufficient variability for selection within most progenies. Differences reflected specific parent combinations rather than type of cross with the V. ashei–V. constablaei derivative progenies. The experiment included both V. ashei and V. ashei–V. constablaei derivative progenies that produced a high percentage of seedlings flowering with or later than highbush blueberries. Two percent of the V. ashei–V. constablaei derivative seedlings bloomed and ripened with the early ripening highbush cultivar ‘Croatan’. Crop ratings were variable in all progenies, and high sds for the cultivars indicated that a high percentage of the variation was environmental. Primary mummy berry infection significantly reduced the crop in several progenies but was not responsible for the poor overall crop performance of most. Mean fruit size of the V. ashei intercross was large enough for hand harvest, while all but the 2 smallest-fruited V. ashei- V. constablaei derivative progenies were large enough for mechanical harvesting. Fruit of most progenies were commercially acceptable for color, picking scar, firmness, and flavor.

Open Access

Abstract

Experiments were conducted on the Easter lily cultivars (Lilium longiflorum thunb.) Ace and Nellie White over a 4-year period to compare ancymidol bulb dips to media drenches and foliar spray applications. Several bulb dip concentrations and durations were used. ‘Ace’ plants responded more than ‘Nellie White’ plants to bulb dips, primarily because of more natural vigorous growth of ‘Ace’ plants. A 1-hr dip at 33 ppm gave adequate height control, but flowering was delayed. Reliance on bulb dips to achieve optimum height control may be questionable because ancymidol must be applied before one is certain excessive height will be a problem. Chemical name used: α-cyclopropyl-α-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-pyrimidinemethanol (ancymidol).

Open Access