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  • Author or Editor: William F. Reeder x
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Abstract

‘Irwin’, ‘Tommy Atkins’, and ‘Kent’ mangos (Mangifera indica L.) softened (ripened) with less decay at 21°C in air under normal pressure, and had a higher percentage of acceptable fruits, if they had been stored for 3 weeks at 13°, 98-100% relative humidity, and an atmospheric pressure of 76 or 152 mm Hg rather than at normal atmospheric pressure. ‘Keitt’ mangos softened similarly whether stored at low or normal pressure. Low pressure storage extended shelf life: mangos stored at 152 mm Hg required 3-5 days longer to soften after storage than similar fruits stored at 760 mm Hg. Softening times were similar for mangos of the same cultivar stored at 76 and 152 mm Hg.

Open Access

Early, mid-, and late-season grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf.) were treated with hot air at 46, 48, and 50C for 3, 5, or 7 hours to determine the effects of time and temperature on market quality. Early and late-season fruit were more easily' damaged by the higher temperatures than midseason fruit. Increased times at the lower temperatures had less of a deleterious effect on weight loss, loss of firmness and color, and susceptibility to scalding injury and fungal decay than did shorter times at the higher temperatures. Nevertheless, regression equations predicted that 3 hours at 48C or 2 hours at 49C would not adversely affec: market quality of early and midseason fruit. The suitability of these equations was verified through taste tests of Juice. It may not be possible, however, to raise the treatment temperature for late-season fruit above 47.5C without damaging the quality of juice from these fruit.

Free access

Abstract

‘Waldin’, ‘Booth 8’, and ‘Lula’ avocados (Persea americana Miller) were not acceptable when softened at 21.1 °C in air under normal pressure, if they had been stored for 4–6 weeks at 7.2-10.0°, 98-100% relative humidity, and an atmospheric pressure of 76, 152, or 760 mm Hg. ‘Waldin’ avocados were acceptable when softened after 25 days at 7.2°C and 91 mm Hg provided that storage was in 2% O2 and 10% CO2. The results suggest that atmospheres both low in O2 and high in CO2 are necessary for the successful storage of avocados under low pressure. Under these conditions the low pressure system is comparable to the standard controlled atmosphere system in which avocados are stored in 2% O2 and 10% CO2 at normal atmospheric pressure.

Open Access

Abstract

‘Tahiti’ (‘Persian’) limes (Citrus latifolia Tanaka) retained green color, juice content, and flavor acceptable for marketing and had a low incidence of decay during storage at a low atmospheric pressure of 170 mm Hg for up to 6 weeks at 10.0°C or 15.6° and a relative humidity (RH) of 98—100%. Check fruits turned yellow within 3 weeks at normal atmospheric pressure (760 mm Hg). Limes stored for 4 weeks at 170 mm Hg at 2.2°C and 98—100% RH developed as much chilling injury as comparable limes stored at normal atmospheric pressure. Limes coated with wax containing 0.1% of either thiabendazole or benomyl remained green and suitable for marketing after 3—4 weeks at 170 mm Hg at 21.1°C.

Open Access

Abstract

Storage of ‘Lula’ avocados in controlled atmosphere (CA) of 2% oxygen (O2) and 10% carbon dioxide (CO2) at 50°F for 30, 45, and 60 days resulted in more acceptable fruit than storage in air at this temp for similar durations. The removal of ethylene from the storage chambers increased the percentage of acceptable fruits, especially in the lots stored 60 days. CA-stored avocados, when placed in air at 70°F, softened more slowly than similar fruits that had been stored in air, and those stored without ethylene softened more slowly than those stored with ethylene. Anthracnose decay was the primary factor affecting acceptability, especially during the softening period at 70°F

Open Access

Abstract

Tobelle’ sweet corn (Zea mays var. saccharata (Sturtev.) Bailey) stored for 3 weeks at 1.7°C and 98100% relative humidity in controlled atmospheres (2 or 21% 02 with 0, 15, or 25% CO2) or at low atmospheric pressure (50 mm Hg) did not differ significantly in appearance or flavor. Sucrose content of stored corn remained higher in 2% O2 at normal or low atmospheric pressure (76 mm Hg) than in other atmospheres. Ethanol content increased during storage, except in 21% O2 without added CO2, and was highest in corn stored in atmospheres containing 25% CO2. The high sucrose content of ‘Florida Sweet’ even after 3-weeks-storage suggests that for maintenance of high market quality, breeding cultivars that retain quality in combination with prompt precooling offers more chance of success than modified atmospheres.

Open Access