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  • Author or Editor: Will E. Waters x
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Abstract

The uncertainty of continuous supplies and the rapid increase in fossil fuel costs in recent years are serious threats to the nation’s greenhouse industry, especially in northern climates. Temporary fuel shortages for only a few hours during cold weather will destroy many greenhouse crops and bring immediate economic disaster to the individual independent operator. Costs have skyrocketed, and even in the relatively warm state of Florida, greenhouse operators using oil have experienced over 500% cost increases in the past 5 years and are spending as much as $25,000 per ha ($10,000 per acre) for fuel. Continued cost increases could bring about a major shift in the geographical location of greenhouse and related horticulutral industries from northern locations to the southern latitudes of the U.S., or even into the subtropical and tropical regions of the Caribbean area and Central and South America.

Open Access

Abstract

Soil temp, maintained with electric heating cables to 75°F and 85° during the winter and 80° and 90° during the summer accelerated development of cuttings and seedlings of tropical foliage plants in central Florida and reduced time required for propagation up to 50% during the cool months of the year. Generally, plants held at 75° responded as well as those held at 85°.

Open Access