Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: Wayne W. Fish x
Clear All Modify Search

Possible effects of microbe-containing amendments on vegetable development need clarification. Eight-week-old, organically grown seedlings of a bell, cv. Jupiter, and a non-pungent jalapeño, cv. Pace 105, pepper, both C. annuum L., were transplanted into pots containing an organic potting medium in a greenhouse experiments repeated over 2 years. Pots were fertilized with Neptune's Harvest®, a fish emulsion. One of eight amendments [Actinovate AG®, Bio Inoculant®, Bio-S.I.®, Compost Tea® (a decoction of biological material), Mpact®, ‘PMSLA and EO-12’®, Soil Activator®, Super Bio®] was applied at label rates and application timings. The control was Neptune's Harvest only. Three plants from each treatment were periodically harvested. Heights and total fresh and dry weights were determined. At a single terminal harvest, numbers and weights and chlorophyll, carotenoids, and vitamin C contents of fruit were determined. At the conclusion of the study the control, Bio-S.I., Compost Tea, PMSLA and EO-12, and Soil Activator generally produced bell pepper plants that were taller and heavier than those produced by Actinovate AG, Bio Inoculant, Mpact, and Super Bio. Numbers and weights of bell pepper fruit were not consistent over amendments or years. Heights for cv. Pace 105 plants treated with Compost Tea were similar to the control and taller than all others. Plant fresh weights for the control and Compost Tea were similar to that for Bio-S.I. and greater than all others. Dry weight, number and fresh weight of fruit and levels of chlorophylls, carotenoids, and vitamin C in fruit were unaffected. Compost Tea, PMSLA, and Soil Activator were tested in field trials in 2010 and 2011 using both peppers, cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.), cv. Earli Pik, and sweet corn (Zea mays var. rugosa Bonaf), cv. Incredible. Amendments provided no particular benefits under greenhouse or field conditions.

Free access

The shelf life and over-all quality of fresh-cut watermelon from two cultivars grafted onto four rootstocks were compared with fresh-cut fruit from the nongrafted cultivars. Fresh-cut cubic pieces of about 4.5 cm per side were prepared from ripe watermelons grown at the Lane Research Station and were stored at 5 °C in 35-oz PETE containers. Quality attributes of firmness, soluble solids content, lycopene content, and bacterial counts of the pieces were measured after 0, 5, and 10 days of storage. Sugar content of the cut fruit was independent of rootstock and remained constant over the ten days of storage. Lycopene content of the fruit decreased by 5% to 10% during the storage period, regardless of treatment. Bacterial count on the fruit from all treatments remained low and variable during the ten days at 5 °C. Firmness of cut pieces from fruit originating from the grafted plants was dependent upon the rootstock employed, and melons from grafted plants possessed firmer fruit than did those from the nongrafted plants. Overall, the firmness of fruit from all sources decreased 20% to 30% during the ten days of cold storage. However, the firmness of fruit from some of the rootstocks after 10 days of storage was equal to or significantly higher than that of the fruit from nongrafted plants when it was initially cut. Thus, these studies suggest that grafting to a proper rootstock will produce fresh-cut watermelon that is equal in sweetness and lycopene content to its nongrafted counterpart, but it will possess greater crispness throughout its storage on the supermarket shelf.

Free access

Producers of fresh fruits and vegetables face increasing production costs and international market competition. Growers who can offer high-quality watermelons [Citrullus lanatus (Thumb.) Matsum. & Nakai] that are also highly nutritious will have better market opportunities. To accomplish that, germplasm must be identified that has enhanced phytonutrient levels. Surprisingly, there is little information on the genetics of nutritional quality in watermelon. The present study was performed on 56 watermelon cultivars, breeding lines, and PI accessions (hereafter collectively referred to as cultigens) to determine the importance of genotype and environmental effects on L-citrulline concentration in fruit, an amino acid that helps regulate blood pressure. Our results demonstrated that L-citrulline concentration was affected by environment and the amount of environmental effect varies among cultigens. The mean of fruit tested in Lane, OK, was 3.10 mg·g−1 fresh weight and in College Station, TX, it was 1.67 mg·g−1 fresh weight. All cultigens had a higher mean L-citrulline concentration when grown in Lane, OK, instead of College Station, TX. Additionally, the L-citrulline concentration varied considerably within cultigens; i.e., ‘Congo’ had a 1.26 to 7.21 mg·g−1 fresh sample deviation. The cultigen ‘AU-Jubilant’ had the most stable L-citrulline concentration (2.23 to 4.03 mg·g−1 fresh deviation) when tested from one location. Environment did not significantly increase within-genotype variation (average se of 10 cultigens tested at each location was ± 35.3% for College Station, TX, and ± 32.9% for Lane, OK). L-citrulline concentration did not correlate with watermelon type (open-pollinated or F1 hybrid) or flesh color (red, orange, salmon yellow, or white). Differences among cultigens for L-citrulline were large (1.09 to 4.52 mg·g−1 fresh sample). The cultigens with the highest L-citrulline concentration were ‘Tom Watson’, PI 306364, and ‘Jubilee’. These could be used to develop cultivars having a high concentration of L-citrulline.

Free access