Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 31 items for

  • Author or Editor: Wayne B. Sherman x
  • Refine by Access: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Free access

Peter C. Andersen and Wayne B. Sherman

Free access

Jorge Rodriquez A. and Wayne B. Sherman

Free access

Peter C. Andersen and Wayne B. Sherman

Free access

Paul M. Lyrene and Wayne B. Sherman

Open access

Richard E.C. Layne and Wayne B. Sherman

Abstract

Interspecific hybridization is a technique commonly used by plant breeders to transfer genes from one species to another. Interspecific hybrids are usually obtained with greater difficulty than intraspecific hybrids because genetic barriers to hybridization usually increase with an increase in genetic unrelatedness (6, 11, 18, 41). Breeders resort to interspecific hybridization only when the characters are absent or inadequately expressed at the intraspecific level. Stone-fruit breeders have made much use of interspecific hybridization in the improvement of Prunus cultivars and rootstocks (3, 5, 6, 8, 12, 14, 15, 18, 19, 28, 34, 36, 37, 41, 42, 43) particularly in the subgenus Prunophora (plums), because plum species tend to intercross more freely than do members of other subgenera (41, 42). This paper will review the problems that have been encountered in making interspecific Prunus hybrids and the techniques that have been used to overcome them. In addition, techniques are presented that have been employed successfully with other interspecific hybridizations which may have application for Prunus.

Open access

José Chaparro and Wayne B. Sherman

Abstract

Heterosis for embryo length was observed in interspecific crosses between the peach clones ‘Flordaking’ and FL 82–27, and ‘Nonpareil’ almond. No consistent differences in embryo length were observed in peach when selfing was compared to outcrossing to the unrelated peach selection FL 9-26C.

Open access

Jorge Rodriguez-A. and Wayne B. Sherman

Abstract

Attempts to select for flower bud chilling requirement (CR) at the seed stage were made in 58 families obtained from crosses and open-pollination of low chill selections and cultivars of peach and nectarine [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] from the Florida breeding program. A nonsignificant correlation (r = 0.08) between midparent bud CR and family seed CR was obtained. A low significant correlation (r = 0.21**) was obtained between individual seed CR and the CR of the resultant seedling. Seed coat removal had no effect on these correlations. Narrow sense heritability for bud CR as determined by parent-offspring regression was 0.50 ± 0.06. The small range in CR of the seed and pollen parents, 300 to 450 and 200 to 400 chill units, respectively, may explain the low correlation values obtained. The data suggest that it is impractical to screen for seedling CR based on seed CR where the CR for climatic adaptability must be held within a range of less than 300 chill units.

Open access

Paul M. Lyrene and Wayne B. Sherman

Abstract

Native highbush blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) from the flatwoods of Alachua County (North-central), Florida and from Highlands County (Central peninsula) were surveyed for chromosome number and crossability with breeding lines derived from northern highbush cultivars. The Alachua County population was predominately tetraploid; a diploid component differed in leaf serration and glandulation. Tetraploid plants were fully cross-fertile with highbush cultivars and breeding lines. Diploid plants from the Alachua County population were cross fertile with both V. elliottii and V. darrowi. V. corymbosum from Highlands County was diploid.

Free access

Milton E. Tignor Jr., Frederick S. Davies, and Wayne B. Sherman

Citrus hybrids USDA 17-11 [Citrus grandis L. × (C. paradisi Macf. `Duncan' × Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf. `Gotha Road')] and 119 [(C. paradisi Macf. `Duncan' × P. trifoliata (L.) Raf. `Gotha Road') × C. sinensis (L.) Osb. `Succory'], `Hamlin' orange [C. sinensis (L.) Osb.], and satsuma mandarin (C. unshiu Marc.) were planted March 1993 and 1994. Trees were irrigated and fertilized in an identical manner. In 1993, electrolyte leakage readings were taken monthly using 17-11, 119, and satsuma leaf discs. Leaf killing point (LKP) LT50 averaged from –8 to – 9C by mid-November for all selections. In 1994, leaf discs from 17-11, 119, and `Hamlin' orange were sampled weekly to determine LKP. USDA 119 had the lowest LKP and acclimated the fastest during the fall. By the end of November, there was no significant difference in LKP (–6.5C) between USDA 119 and 17-11, although both selections were significantly more freeze-tolerant than `Hamlin' orange (LKP–40C), which showed no significant decrease in LKP until the 6 weeks after the hybrid selections began acclimating. Citrus hybrids 17-11 and 119 can survive in freeze-susceptible areas that are marginal for other commercial citrus.

Free access

Milton E. Tignor Jr., Frederick S. Davies, and Wayne B. Sherman

`Hamlin' orange trees [C. sinensis (L.) Osb.] from a commercial nursery were planted into raised beds on a site that simulated conditions typical of the flatwoods region of the citrus industry. A factorial experiment with three irrigation schedules, based on growth flushes and three nutrient application frequencies (total N, 0.136 kg/tree per year), was conducted in 1994. Trees were irrigated using 90° microsprinklers, and soil moisture content was monitored using a neutron probe. Eleven replicate trees of the nine treatments were included in a completely randomized block design. Weekly freeze tests using the electrolyte leakage method were conducted at –4, –6, and –8C. Electrolyte leakage was determined using a conductivity meter. Different irrigation scheduling based on growth flushes had no significant effect on freezing acclimation. However, increased frequency and lower amounts of fertilizer per application significantly (P = 0.05) increased freeze hardiness from 4.2 to –6.10C by the end of November. Morphological data including trunk diameter, tree height, and flushing status also were recorded. Increasing frequency of nutrient application resulted in a more rapid acclimation of young `Hamlin' orange trees.