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Peter C. Andersen and Wayne B. Sherman

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Peter C. Andersen and Wayne B. Sherman

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Jorge Rodriquez A. and Wayne B. Sherman

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Paul M. Lyrene and Wayne B. Sherman

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Thomas G. Beckman, Jose X. Chaparro and Wayne B. Sherman

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Omar Carrillo-Mendoza, Wayne B. Sherman and José X. Chaparro

Trees without excessive branching are desirable for the reduction of pruning costs. Genetic diversity for less twiggy genotypes exists in peach and a branching index was developed for evaluation and selection of genotypes with reduced branching. The index is based on the number of total first-order branches and the number of second-order, third-order, and fourth-order branches measured on three randomly selected first-order branches. Index values were highly correlated (r 2 ≈0.7) with the total number of branches over two growing seasons and served as a good predictor of branching patterns observed in the third growing season. Thus, the developed branching index is a useful tool in peach breeding, allowing for the early selection of trees with more desirable tree architecture.

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Thomas G. Beckman, Jose X. Chaparro and Wayne B. Sherman

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Peter C. Andersen, Wayne B. Sherman and Ralph H. Sharpe

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Yasar Karakurt, Donald J. Huber and Wayne B. Sherman

Some nonmelting flesh (NMF) peaches develop a characteristic off-flavor during postharvest ripening. A study was conducted using NMF genotypes from the Univ. of Florida breeding program to investigate the off-flavor development in melting flesh (MF) and NMF peach genotypes and to determine the compositional changes associated with the development of off-flavor during postharvest ripening at 8 °C. The study revealed that there were certain chemical components that were consistently associated with the occurrence of off-flavor. Generally, there was a significant increase in total soluble phenolics, polyphenoloxidase (PPO) activity and ethanol content with the increase in the percentage of off-flavored fruit with time in storage at 8 °C in NMF genotypes examined. However, total sugars and total soluble solids decreased significantly during the storage period. These changes in chemical composition of NMF genotypes were not observed in MF genotypes, which did not show off-flavor development. Moreover, highly significant linear correlations were detected between off-flavor development and soluble phenolics, PPO activity, ethanol content, total soluble solids, and sugars in Fla. 92-21C and USDA 87P285, which had the highest percentage of off-flavored fruit. Specifically, soluble phenolics, chlorogenic acid, PPO activity, and ethanol were positively correlated, but soluble sugars and soluble solids were negatively correlated with the off-flavor development. Thus, it is suggested that the accumulation of soluble phenolic compounds and ethanol, and the reduction of soluble solids and sugars contribute to the of off-flavor in NMF genotypes.

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Milton E. Tignor, Frederick S. Davies and Wayne B. Sherman

Two USDA intergeneric, hybrid citrus scions, US 119 {[Citrus paradisi Mac. `Duncan' × Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.] × C. sinensis Osb. `Succory'} and selection 17-11 {C. grandis US 145 × [Citrus paradisi Mac. `Duncan' × P. trifoliata (L.) Raf.]} on `Swingle' citrumelo (C. paradisi × P. trifoliata) rootstocks were examined for freeze hardiness traits (4 years) and general growth characteristics (2 years). Hardiness was compared with that of `Hamlin' orange [C. sinensis (L.) Osb.] and satsuma mandarin (C. unshiu Marc) from Fall 1993 to Spring 1997. As expected, US 119 and 17-11 were both hardier than `Hamlin' orange as determined by leaf disc electrolyte leakage (EL). Both showed freezing tolerance similar to that of satsuma mandarin, but 17-11 was significantly hardier than satsuma or US 119 at several times during the 4-year study. Trunk diameter and tree height were similar for US 119 and selection 17-11.