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Steven G. Russell, Sylvia M. Blankenship and Walter A. Skroch

A field study was initiated in 1981 in western North Carolina to determine the influence of eight groundcover management systems on quality of `Redchief Red Delicious' apple (Malus domestica) grafted onto rootstock of M VIIA. Management systems included: bare soil, Secale cereale mulch, minimal cultivation, Festuca arundinacea, Dactylis glomerata, Poa pratensis, Muhlenbergia schreberi and Rubus sp. Thus far, fruit quality data indicate that fruits produced in plots of cool-season grasses are smaller and less mature than those produced in vegetation-free plots or plots of warm-season grasses. A negative correlation was noted between high fruit quality and water deficit stress as measured by water potential and stomatal conductance.

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Steven G. Russell, Sylvia M. Blankenship and Walter A. Skroch

A field study was initiated in 1981 in western North Carolina to determine the influence of eight groundcover management systems on quality of `Redchief Red Delicious' apple (Malus domestica) grafted onto rootstock of M VIIA. Management systems included: bare soil, Secale cereale mulch, minimal cultivation, Festuca arundinacea, Dactylis glomerata, Poa pratensis, Muhlenbergia schreberi and Rubus sp. Thus far, fruit quality data indicate that fruits produced in plots of cool-season grasses are smaller and less mature than those produced in vegetation-free plots or plots of warm-season grasses. A negative correlation was noted between high fruit quality and water deficit stress as measured by water potential and stomatal conductance.

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D. Michael Benson, Paul R. Fantz and Walter A. Skroch

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Stuart L. Warren, C. Ray Campbell and Walter A. Skroch

Fraser fir [Abies fraseri (Pursh) Poir.] and Norway spruce [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] were grown in seven vegetation management programs ranging from 100% cover of grass-dominated vegetation to bare soil on opposing north and south aspects. Concentrations of 13 nutrients were determined at three growth stages during 2 years: active terminal growth, cessation of terminal expansion, and dormancy. Aspect did not affect nutrient concentrations. Vegetation management programs bad a significant impact on nutrient concentration for both species. Nitrogen, Ca, B, Fe, and Mn concentrations during dormancy were negatively correlated with herbaceous biomass. In contrast, N during active growth and P and Mg concentrations during all stages were positively correlated with herbaceous biomass. Vegetation management only affected the seasonal trend of Mo. Seasonal trends varied by nutrient in both species.