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  • Author or Editor: W.D. Scott x
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Greenhouse and field studies were conducted using research coolers to expose 4 week old `Superstar' muskmelons, planted into 1 liter plastic containers, to chilling temperatures. Temperatures of 1, 5, & 9 °C were arranged in factorial combination with lengths of exposures 6, 12, & 24 hours and number of exposures 1, 3, & 5. In the Greenhouse studies single plant experimental units were allowed to grow for 2 weeks following application of the chilling treatments, then growth data was taken. In field studies, exposed muskmelons were planted into 8 plants/plot units when all plants had received chilling treatments. Leaf area and plant dry weight of `Superstar' melons were significantly reduced by both the interaction of temperature and length of exposure and times exposed and temperature, with dramatic reductions in leaf area occurring at 24 hours of exposure or 5 times exposed at 1 °C. A significant interaction was found between times exposed or length of exposure and temperature on vine length, flower number and type measurements taken 4 weeks after chilled transplants were established in the field. Additionally, fruit number and mean melon weight were reduced by ether exposure to 10C, exposure of 24 hours or 3 times exposed.

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Three cultivars of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus), `Crimson Sweet', `Charleston Gray' and `Tri-X Seedless' were grown in combination with 4 levels of soil applied calcium (0, 280, 560, 1120 kg Ca/ha). Gypsum was incorporated into 6 m plots on 5 m centers then covered with black plastic mulch. Irrigation requirements were provided through a M-wall drip system and soil water status monitored with tensiometers. Transplants were spaced 1.2 m apart in-row spacing allowing for 5 plants per plot and replicated times. Rind tissue from mature watermelon fruit was divided into 4 sections, blossom-end, middle top, grounds spot and stem end. Each section was measured for resistance to shear and puncture by a Model T-1200-G texture and tenderometer system. Thickness was also measured. Lab determinations for total and extractable calcium on the sections was done to determine if there is a relationship between rind resiliency and calcium concentration. Data will be presented et the meeting.

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Three cultivars of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus), `Crimson Sweet', `Charleston Gray' and `Tri-X Seedless' were grown in combination with 4 levels of soil applied calcium (0, 280, 560, 1120 kg Ca/ha). Gypsum was incorporated into 6 m plots on 5 m centers then covered with black plastic mulch. Irrigation requirements were provided through a hi-wall drip system and soil water status monitored with tensiometers. Transplants were spaced 1.2 m apart in-row spacing allowing for 5 plants per plot and replicated 3 times. Melons were harvested at 7, 14, 21 days from anthesis and at full maturity. Rind tissue was analyzed for total and extractable Ca, Mg, K, Mn, Zn and Fe. Leaf samples were taken 6 weeks from transplanting for similar analysis, Yield, vine growth and the incidence of blossom-end rot were recorded. The study was conducted at 2 locations during the 1989 and 1990 growing seasons. Data will be presented at the meeting,

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Three cultivars of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus), `Crimson Sweet', `Charleston Gray' and `Tri-X Seedless' were grown in combination with 4 levels of soil applied calcium (0, 280, 560, 1120 kg Ca/ha). Gypsum was incorporated into 6 m plots on 5 m centers then covered with black plastic mulch. Irrigation requirements were provided through a hi-wall drip system and soil water status monitored with tensiometers. Transplants were spaced 1.2 m apart in-row spacing allowing for 5 plants per plot and replicated 3 times. Melons were harvested at 7, 14, 21 days from anthesis and at full maturity. Rind tissue was analyzed for total and extractable Ca, Mg, K, Mn, Zn and Fe. Leaf samples were taken 6 weeks from transplanting for similar analysis, Yield, vine growth and the incidence of blossom-end rot were recorded. The study was conducted at 2 locations during the 1989 and 1990 growing seasons. Data will be presented at the meeting,

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Tomato mottle virus (ToMoV) is a silverleaf whitefly (Bemisia argentifolii Bellows and Perring n. sp.) transmitted, bipartite geminivirus that infects tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.). Inbred lines resistant to ToMoV were derived from Lycopersicon chilense Dunal accession LA 1932. Inheritance was studied using a family developed from the crossing of a resistant inbred with a susceptible tomato inbred over two seasons. The F1 had resistance intermediate to the parents and generation means analysis of F1 and F2, backcross and parental populations suggested that the action of at least two additive genes with high heritability (h2 n.s. = 0.87) controlled ToMoV resistance. When data from the two seasons were combined, an acceptable fit to an additive-dominance genetic model was obtained. Single plant comparisons, bulk comparisons, and tailends of F2 populations segregating for ToMoV resistance derived from LA 1932 identified randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers using eight hundred 10-mer oligonucleotide primers. The F2 populations used for inheritance studies were screened for polymorphic markers, and 12 RAPD markers associated with the ToMoV resistant line were linked to the morphological markers self-pruning (sp) and potato leaf (c) on chromosome 6. RAPD markers that were associated with ToMoV resistance segregated into two linked regions flanking either side of the sp and c loci. The molecular studies suggested that the action of at least two additive regions controlled ToMoV resistance which supported the inheritance analysis.

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Nine treatments, arranged in a RCB design with 4 replications on 20m rows/plot, were all soiled applied and incorporated under black polyethylene mulch, prior to planting. The treatments were: methyl bromide (MB) 98 and 67 & chloropicrin at 168 kgha-1, metham sodium at 17 & 34 1ha-1, oxamyl at 1.6 & 3.21 1ha-1, fosthiazate 6.5 & 13 kgha-1, and a control. Four week-old `Crimson Sweet' watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) transplants were established 3 weeks after chemical applications were made. Soil samples were taken in the plastic row-middle, plastic edge, 30 cm off the plastic edge and 15, 30 & 45 cm deep at each sampling location 3 and 6 weeks after transplanting. The presence of Root-knot Nematode, RKN, (Meloidogyne spp.) was established by using `Mountain Pride' tomato as a bioassay. Fruit size and total yield were recorded and the economic return for each control practice calculated. The 1.6 1ha-1 oxamyl plots yielded 6,832 kgha-1 more than the control which corresponds to a return of $183 for the investment of that control. The 3.2 1ha-1 plots had a yield increase of 7,728 kgha-1 and a return of $103, followed by, in order of yield response, 17 1ha-1 Metham plots, 18,592 kgha-1 & $498, 34 1ha-1 Metham plots, 25,872 & $693, MB 67 plots, 35,952 kgha-1 & $752, and MB 98 plots, 37,072 kgha-1 & $851.

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Muskmelons (Cucumis melo L. cv. Superstar) were grown at two between-row spacings (1.5 m or 2.1 m) and four in-row spacings (0.6, 0.9, 1.2, or 1.5 m), corresponding to populations from 3074 to 10763 plants ha-1, to determine the influence of row spacing and population on melon growth and yield. The study was conducted at two sites in 1993, one in northern and one in southern Indiana. Numbers of flowers and early season vine growth were not significantly different between treatments. In southern Indiana, the number of fruit harvested per plot increased as in-row spacing decreased; means ranged from 5.2 fruit plot-1 for 0.6 m in-row spacing, to 4.7 fruit for 0.9 m in-row spacing, 3.9 fruit for 1.2 m in-row spacing, and 3.3 fruit for 1.5 m in-row spacing. Harvests were significantly earlier for the 0.6 m in-row spacing. Mean melon weight was significantly greater for 1.5 m in-row spacing, averaging 4.1 kg, compared to 3.8, 3.7, and 3.7 kg for 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2 m in-row spacings, respectively. Between-row spacing did not affect number or weight of melons. There were no significant interactions between in-row and between-row spacings.

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Abstract

‘Ohio CR-6’ is a pink-fruited, tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) hybrid adapted to greenhouse culture with resistance to Fusarium crown and root rot (Fusarium oxys-porum f. sp. lycopersici radieus). It was released by the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Aug. 1982.

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Abstract

A clone of the diploid blueberry species Vaccinium atrococcum Heller, was previously found to be highly resistant to the fungus tetraploid highbusy blueberry. The tetraploid V. atrococcum was highly root-rot resistant in a greenhouse study. It was crossed with ‘Earliblue’ and 85 seedlings were obtained. In general, the seedlings were fertile, had small, dark fruit with mild flavor, good scars and quite soft flesh consistency.

Blueberry selections Me-US 32 and Michigan Lowbush 1, and cultivars ‘Berkeley’, ‘Bluecrop’, ‘Earliblue’, and ‘Dixi’ were screened in the greenhouse for resistance to P. cinnamomi. Michigan Lowbush 1 was highly resistant to the root-rot fungus. Me-US 32 was resistant, but all the cultivars were susceptible. Michigan Lowbush 1 is a grandparent and probably the source of resistance of Me-US 32.

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Abstract

Octoploid progenies from species crosses between Fragaria virginiana Duch. ⨯ F. chiloensis (L.) Duch., F. virginianaF. ⨯ ananassa Duch., and 2 BC1 crosses to F. ⨯ ananassa were grown in replicated plots and data obtained on winter survival, vigor of growth, time of bloom, productivity, and size of fruit. The ‘Ambato’ clone of F. chiloensis from South America transmitted susceptibility to winter injury and its progenies were weak. Progenies with the ‘Sheldon’ clone of F. virginiana as a parent were vigorous, early blossoming, productive, and had small fruit. ‘Sheldon’ ⨯ ‘Midland’ was most vigorous and the earliest blossoming of all progenies. US 3563 ⨯ ‘Midland’ and ‘Surecrop’ ⨯ ‘Midland’ progenies were the most productive. Among the progenies ‘Surecrop’ ⨯ ‘Ambato’ and ‘Surecrop’ ⨯ ‘Midland’ had the largest mean size of fruit; ‘Sheldon’ ⨯ ‘Yaquina’ the smallest. The ‘Ambato’ and ‘Yaquina’ clones of F. chiloensis differed in transmission of characteristics to their progenies.

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