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  • Author or Editor: W. P. Nye x
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Abstract

Inbred onions, Allium cepa L., were grown with different levels of fertilizer and soil moisture to determine treatment influence on seed yield. Nitrogen (253 kg/ha) alone or in combination with P (162 kg/ha) reduced plant survival, umbels per plant, pollination index, and seed yield where soil moisture was low but the reduction was nil or not as severe where soil moisture was high.

Open Access

Abstract

A path-coefficient analysis was used to furnish information on the inter-relationships of pollinating insect activity and components of seed yield in inbreds of Allium cepa L. The inbreds differed very significantly in their attractiveness to pollinating insects. Only one inbred exhibited a significant correlation (P <0.05 positive) between numbers of honey bees and seed yields. Separating the correlation coefficients into components of direct and indirect effects indicated that pollination attractiveness was not the limiting factor in seed set for inbreds in the experiment. Moreover, most of the variation in seed yield could be attributed to indirect effects on the components of yield, umbels per plant, flowers per umbel, percent per fertilized flower, and seeds per fertilized flower.

Open Access

Abstract

The ratio of pollen-fertile to pollen-sterile rows was more than twice the recommended ratio. The activity of honey bees, Apis mellifera L., was largely limited to pollen collecting on the pollen parent rows; there was an average of 100 bees per 100 ft of row on the pollen-parent as compared with a maximum of 40 bees per 100 ft of row on the male-steriles. Bee activity and seed yields (which were generally unsatisfactory) decreased as the distance from the pollen rows increased. About half of the bees sampled at the hive entrances had pollen loads and about 8 percent of these were onion pollen. Samples from the pollen traps contained 6 percent onion pollen. Onion as a source of pollen is less attractive to honey bees than other sources in the area. The viability of onion pollen from flowers in the morning was 2 to 3 times greater than in the afternoon. Onion pollen taken from pollen traps did not germinate.

Open Access

This study was conducted to determine if there is a difference between the career advancement of alumni of ornamental horticulture associate (terminal) degree and nondegree programs. A survey of the alumni of three associate degree and three nondegree training programs was administered, using guidelines from career advancement validation research conducted at Alverno College, Milwaukee. Wis. (Ben-Ur and Rogers, 1994). Six programs were selected from North Carolina, Maine, Ohio, and southeastern Canada, including parts of Ontario and Quebec and all of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. The programs were selected because of their perceived high reputations, as based on a survey sent to eight selected Longwood Gardens staff (Kennett Square, Pa.) and six professors in the Plant and Soils Science Department at the University of Delaware (Newark). Survey respondents were initially chosen based on their knowledge of the field of horticulture and of ornamental horticulture educational programs. The statistical analysis of the data did not support the presupposition that there would be a significant difference between the career advancement in favor of graduates from horticultural associate degree programs.

Free access